The Graduate School invites your program’s participation in a campus-based competition for selection of OSU’s nominee for the 2012-13 WAGS/UMI Distinguished Master’s Thesis Award.

This award recognizes distinguished scholarly achievement at the master’s level. Nominations will be accepted in any discipline in which the institution offers a master’s degree. A nominee must have earned the master’s degree within the period of July 1, 2011, through June 30, 2012.

This prestigious regional competition is an important opportunity for OSU to showcase the scholarly excellence of our master’s students to institutions throughout the western region and to celebrate our success. We encourage you to take the time to prepare a nomination.

OSU ELIGIBLE PROGRAMS: Any discipline in which a master’s degree is offered.

OSU AWARDS AND RECOGNITION: Each nominee will receive a certificate of accomplishment from the Graduate School to recognize the nominee’s scholarly achievement at the master’s level within his/her graduate program. The Graduate School will provide a cash award of $500 to the student selected as OSU’s nominee for the Western Association of Graduate Schools/UMI Distinguished Master’s Thesis Award.  In addition, the Graduate School will award $500 to the graduate department/program that submits the thesis selected as OSU’s nominee for the Western Association of Graduate Schools/UMI Distinguished Master’s Thesis Award.

PROCEDURES: Each graduate program may submit only one nomination for consideration. Graduate programs must provide in one electronic PDF file items b, c, d as reflected in the attached WAGS/UMI guidelines. Please refer to the full announcement for complete details.

NOMINATION DEADLINE: To facilitate the internal selection process, please submit all nomination materials to the Graduate School by 5:00 p.m., Monday, July 9, 2011 to the following e-mail address: Graduate.Scholarships@oregonstate.edu.

Outstanding Thesis Award Announcement GENERAL

NEW COMPOUND COULD BECOME “COOL BLUE” FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN BUILDINGS

CORVALLIS, Ore. – A new type of durable, environmentally-benign blue pigment discovered at Oregon State University has also been found to have unusual characteristics in reflecting heat – it’s a “cool blue” compound that could become important in new approaches to saving energy in buildings.

The compound, which has now received patent approval, was discovered about three years ago almost by chance, as OSU scientists were studying some materials for their electrical properties.

Its potential use to help reduce heat absorption on the roofs and walls of buildings – which is an evolving field of considerable interest in warm regions where cooling is a major expense – adds another role for the material, which is now being considered for various commercial applications.

“This pigment has infrared heat reflectivity of about 40 percent, which is significantly higher than most blue pigments now being used,” said Mas Subramanian, an OSU professor of chemistry who discovered the compound.

“The more we discover about the pigment, the more interesting it gets,” Subramanian said. “We already knew it had advantages of being more durable, safe and fairly easy to produce. Now it also appears to be a new candidate for energy efficiency.”

“Cool roofing,” in which paints are used to reflect significant portions of the sun’s heat and thereby reduce cooling costs, is an important new trend in “green” construction and energy efficiency, experts say. Such reflective coatings also are more aesthetically pleasing, have less thermal degradation, reduce the “heat island” effect in cities, lower peak energy demand, and reduce air pollution due to lower energy use and power plant emissions.

“We’re seeking licensing partners for this invention right now,” said Mary Phillips, associate director of the Office for Commercialization and Corporate Development at OSU. “We believe it can contribute to new energy efficiency solutions around the world.”

In general, any darker color of the type often used for roofs, houses, automobiles or other applications will tend to absorb more heat. But some compounds, like the one discovered at OSU, have dark tones but also the ability to reflect heat in the infrared spectrum, which is responsible for most of the heat energy absorbed from sunlight.

The material created at OSU, researchers say, is probably the best blue pigment humans have produced since ancient times – going back to efforts by the Egyptians, the Han dynasty in China and Mayan cultures. Blue pigments have been sought through history but often had serious drawbacks, such as decaying quickly, being toxic, costly or carcinogenic.

In research funded by the National Science Foundation, OSU scientists discovered this material by coincidence while they were looking for something else.

Some manganese compounds came out of a 2,000 degree Fahrenheit oven transformed into a beautiful blue, which researchers later determined was due to an unusual “trigonal bipyramidal coordination” of their molecules that changed when exposed to extreme heat.

Research will continue at OSU on the heat reflectance capabilities of the new compound and the underlying molecular structure responsible for it, scientists said.

About the OSU College of Science: As one of the largest academic units at OSU, the College of Science has 14 departments and programs, 13 pre-professional programs, and provides the basic science courses essential to the education of every OSU student. Its faculty are international leaders in scientific research.

Researchers at Oregon State University have discovered a chemical compound, a “cool blue” pigment that has notable heat reflecting properties that could lead to new approaches to saving energy in buildings.

The patent-approved compound could be used to develop roofing paint and other products that would reduce heat absorption.

“The pigment has infrared heat reflectivity of about 40 percent, which is significantly higher than most blue pigments now being used,” said Mas Subramanian, the OSU professor of chemistry who discovered the compound, in a press release.

Subramanian said the pigment is also safe, durable and relatively easy to produce.

Mary Phillips, associate director of OSU’s office for commercialization and corporate development, said the university is looking for licensing partners to develop the compound into products.

“We believe it can contribute to new energy efficiency solutions around the world,” Phillips said.

OSU said the manganese compound — molecules transformed by a 2,000-degree Farenheit oven into a beautiful blue — was discovered in research funded by the National Science Foundation.

Researchers say it’s probably the best blue pigment humans have produced since ancient times – going back to efforts by the Egyptians, the Han dynasty in China and Mayan cultures. Blue pigments have been sought through history but often had serious drawbacks, such as decaying quickly, being toxic, costly or carcinogenic.

 

New compound could become “cool blue” for energy efficiency in buildings

A new type of durable, environmentally-benign blue pigment discovered at Oregon State University (OSU) has also been found to have unusual characteristics in reflecting heat – it’s a “cool blue” compound that could become important in new approaches to saving energy in buildings.

The compound, which has now received patent approval, was discovered about three years ago almost by chance, as OSU scientists were studying some materials for their electrical properties.

Its potential use to help reduce heat absorption on the roofs and walls of buildings – which is an evolving field of considerable interest in warm regions where cooling is a major expense – adds another role for the material, which is now being considered for various commercial applications.

“This pigment has infrared heat reflectivity of about 40 per cent, which is significantly higher than most blue pigments now being used,” said Mas Subramanian, an OSU professor of chemistry who discovered the compound.

“The more we discover about the pigment, the more interesting it gets,” Subramanian said. “We already knew it had advantages of being more durable, safe and fairly easy to produce. Now it also appears to be a new candidate for energy efficiency.”

“Cool roofing,” in which paints are used to reflect significant portions of the Sun’s heat and thereby reduce cooling costs, is an important new trend in “green” construction and energy efficiency, experts say. Such reflective coatings also are more aesthetically pleasing, have less thermal degradation, reduce the “heat island” effect in cities, lower peak energy demand, and reduce air pollution due to lower energy use and power plant emissions.

“We’re seeking licensing partners for this invention right now,” said Mary Phillips, associate director of the Office for Commercialisation and Corporate Development at OSU. “We believe it can contribute to new energy efficiency solutions around the world.”

In general, any darker colour of the type often used for roofs, houses, automobiles or other applications will tend to absorb more heat. But some compounds, like the one discovered at OSU, have dark tones but also the ability to reflect heat in the infrared spectrum, which is responsible for most of the heat energy absorbed from sunlight.

The material created at OSU, researchers say, is probably the best blue pigment humans have produced since ancient times – going back to efforts by the Egyptians, the Han dynasty in China and Mayan cultures. Blue pigments have been sought through history but often had serious drawbacks, such as decaying quickly, being toxic, costly or carcinogenic.

In research funded by the National Science Foundation, OSU scientists discovered this material by coincidence while they were looking for something else.

Some manganese compounds came out of a 1 093-degree Celsius oven transformed into a beautiful blue, which researchers later determined was due to an unusual “trigonal bipyramidal coordination” of their molecules that changed when exposed to extreme heat.

Research will continue at OSU on the heat reflectance capabilities of the new compound and the underlying molecular structure responsible for it, scientists said.

 

 

Background on this Event: First Friday is a casual event held once per month on the first working Friday at the University Motor Pool. We started these potlucks as an opportunity for people with different schedules to pause from work and get together for lunch to enjoy the people connections and community aspect of working at a great University.

Mark your calendars for upcoming events on the first Friday of every month or pickup the new Motor Pool calendars (we marked it for you).

We hope to see you on First Fridays!

 

Micron Technology Inc. is finishing a R&D Fabrication Facility in Boise Idaho and is currently aggressively searching for qualified candidates to fill positions.  Most of the positions will be graduate level positions but there will likely be a full spectrum of possible jobs and educational requirements.  A list of the positions available for outside candidates can be found at the following link: www.micron.com/jobs.  There might be very good job opportunities here for some of our graduates.  Applicants can apply directly from the web site or they can forward their applications through Shane Trapp, Dry Etch R&D, Micron Technology (208 368 4728; ) and he can pass them along to the appropriate people.

 

Undergraduate of the Quarter - Fall 2012
Undergraduate of the Quarter – Fall 2012

Matthew Stolt has been selected as an undergrad chem major of the quarter for Spring 2012.  Matt was born and raised in Oregon – growing up in the Beaverton area. He attended Jesuit High School.  He cites his big brother as a significant influence in his life including encouraging him to attend Jesuit High School as well as Oregon State University.  While he came to OSU initially to be a Chemistry Engineering major, one of his friends, Evan, got him interested in becoming a Chemistry major.  Matt has been conducting undergraduate research with Mas Subramanian since his sophomore year.  He initially worked closely with senior graduate student Geneva Laurita-Plankis; however, he is now working on an independent project within Professor Subramanian’s lab.   He specifically mentioned emeritus professor Glenn Evans as his favorite teacher. He described Dr. Evans has “unbelievably challenging,” but he did a wonderful job of making sure that the students really “know” the material.  Matt plans to continue his education after graduation – likely getting a PhD in materials / inorganic chemistry.  He would like to thank all the faculty and students he has worked with during his time here as well as his study group and friends for their support. We congratulate Matt on all his accomplishments to date and he is a wonderful part of the Chemistry program at OSU!

All members of the Arts & Sciences Business Center will be attending a professional development event this Thursday, May 31, 2012 from 8AM – 1:30PM.  Our offices will be closed during that time, but will reopen at 1:30PM.  We are sorry if this causes any inconvenience.  You may work with your business center contacts to make special arrangements if necessary.

Please forward this on to others in your units that need to be aware of this closure.  You are welcome to contact me with questions/concerns.

Thank you.

 

Mark

 

Mark A. Johnson C.P.A.

Business Center Manager

Arts & Sciences Business Center

Cordley 2046

Oregon State University

Mark.Johnson@oregonstate.edu

541-737-3125

 

Opportunities for agricultural scientists as Fulbright Scholars are somewhat rare, but a new opportunity has become available. The URL below provides information regarding the Distinguished Chair in Agricultural Technology and Education that will be located at Moscow State Agroengineering University named after V.P. Goryachkin (MSAU).

http://catalog.cies.org/viewAward.aspx?n=3320

Please forward this opportunity to interested and qualified individuals. Applicants must be at the academic rank of associate professor or professor. The application deadline is 1 August 2012.

All teaching will be in English, and the Award is for either all teaching or teaching and research. If research is planned, then “Russian-language fluency sufficient to complete the research project is required.”  Interested applicants are encouraged to review the “Special Features” and the Disciplines/Specializations sections of the announcement. Any questions can be directed to Dr. Valery Chumakov, the Vice-Rector of MSAU at (valery.chumakov@yahoo.ca).

 

Dear Chemistry, LPI, Public Health,  and ALS Faculty Colleagues:

The ALS Department Heads invite you to our monthly ALS Faculty Coffee
and Social Hour, Monday, May 21, from 10:00-11:00 am. It will be hosted
by EMT this month and will be held in ALS 1019B).  Coffee, tea and an assortment of
snacks will be provided.

The goal of the gathering is to foster and encourage personal
interactions and communication between individual faculty in the ALS
building. There is no specific program, it is simply an opportunity to
meet and greet your fellow faculty for some collegial conversation.

We look forward to the seeing you on Monday.