Grading: Same as it Ever Was? There’s No Better Time than NOW, to Change

At the start of the pandemic, now over a year ago, it struck me that the words of the Talking Heads classic, Once in a Lifetime fit the situation well with a few tweaks (And you may find yourself, With online finals, With online meetings, And you may ask yourself, well, How did I get here?). Now, another part of that extremely hummable ditty is resonating in my head -Same as it ever was, same as it ever was.

Higher education is looking forward to going back to normal. We missed face to face classes, seeing our students every week, being able to have discussions with the ability to read body language and eye contact, and all the impromptu conversations that took place. In March 2020, we pivoted to emergency remote teaching. Then for a year we taught and leant remotely as best as we could. With the discovery of the vaccine (yay science) and the increase in immunity (yay people getting their shots everywhere), Fall 2021 is looking like it will be the same as it ever was.  But should it?

There are many ways that higher education is going to change with what we learnt from the pandemic (a topic already addressed in multiple venues). Education should probably not be the same as it ever was. There is nothing like a pandemic to break routine. In addition to keeping the innovations we used to teach remotely, educators should jump at this opportunity to change what we did imperfectly before, and which did not get the close examination it needed. One of the best places to focus is how we measure learning.

Students go to college to learn and improve their job prospects, in addition to meeting friends and the lure of a rich social life. Instructors are paid to help students learn. Unfortunately, the measurement of learning leaves a lot to be desired. Most classes have students required to read material (often a textbook), go to a class (often lecture based), and then take an exam (often multiple-choice). While there are many classes, especially smaller ones, that are packed with smart course design, featuring active learning opportunities, class discussion, and writing and application assignments, most of these activities still result in a grade.

Grades are mostly earned on a scale from an A going down to an F. Sometimes there are half increments and decrements, the A+ or A-. Grades are either assigned based on points related to detailed rubrics, guides to what effort related to which grade, or awarded with instructors eye-balling essays using an implicit measure in their own heads, a general sense of whether the student “got it” or not.  Multiple-choice exams are commonly “graded” by a computer that tallies up the number of answers correctly mapping on to an answer key.

Same as it ever was. Or at least the same as it has been for about 80 years.

A large part of the issue for the use of grades has been the need for standardization often leading to an obsession with standardized testing (see Anya Kamenetz’s The Test). It is easy to do what has always been done. New teachers often use the syllabi of those who taught the course before them. Sometimes they even use versions of the exams and assignments of previous teachers. Even when teachers may feel, deep in their gut, or for that matter at the very surface, that a multiple-choice exam is not really measuring learning, there is an obvious impediment to change — the alternative would be an unreasonable amount of work. The sheer magnitude of grading written essays for 300 students makes considering an alternative untenable. Often, it is unclear what a good option can be.

But there are alternatives and THIS SUMMER, before classes start again in the Fall, may be just the time to consider changing age old practices. There is time to give grading some deep thought. Yes, get your summer fun in first and as well, but then do not squander this chance.

There are a range of possibilities for change. Two contenders are Ungrading, and Specifications Grading.  In ungrading, a movement that has already spawned an edited book with instructors providing ways to do it (Blum, 2020), the solution is simple:  Don’t grade!!  With ungrading, the instructor instead gives feedback, and structures peer and self review. If a university requires a grade (and most do) the student often provides their own grade in consultation with their instructor. For a concise introduction to this approach, see Jesse Stommel’s aptly titled “How to Ungrade.”  Inspired to experiment and want more, then get a copy of the Blum book and really dive in.

A slightly older concept involves the use of specifications. Popularized by Linda Nilson whose book also has a neat history of grading, specs grading as she calls it, involves specifying what would represent knowing the concept or mastering the skill required. The student submits an assignment and if it meets the specifications for that assignment it gets full points. If it does not, it gets no points but the student has the opportunity to revise it and try again. Sometimes instructors allow the student multiple opportunities to revise until the specifications are met. Here the emphasis is on mastery and not on levels of accomplishment pushed by traditional grading systems. Is there really an objective difference between a C and a C+? Between an A and a B-?  Instead the student focuses on nailing it.  For a short introduction to specification grading see Hall and listen to a great podcast with Linda Nilson.

Here is the bottom line. It is time we change how we measure learning. The best place to start is to think long and hard about our grading practices. It may even be a great time to think hard about assessment in general (for a great guide to assessment see this piece by Jane Halonen and colleagues). With the summer ahead of us, and a year of turbulence and emergency remote teaching behind us, this is the time to throw away old norms and break poor habits. Most of us have felt the needs to grade differently. THIS is the time to try something new.  Use it.

References

Blum, S. D. (Ed.). (2020). Ungrading: Why rating students undermines learning (and what to do instead).  West Virginia Press.

Halonen, J., Dunn, D., McEntaffer, R., Gurung, R. A. R., Franks, S., Gonzalez, S., Feldman, A., & Julian, M. (2018). Assessment guide for psychology teachers.  American Psychological Association.

Kamenetz, A. (2015).  The test: Why our schools are obsessed with standardized testing- but you don’t have to be. PublicAffairs Books.

Nilson, L. B. (2015). Specifications grading: Restoring rigor, motivating students, and saving faculty time.  Stylus.

About the author: Regan A. R. Gurung, Ph.D. is Associate Vice Provost and Executive Director of the Center for Teaching and Learning at Oregon State University and Professor of Psychological Science.

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Congratulations and Thank You!

OSU MU QuadThe Center for Teaching and Learning congratulates Oregon State University’s record 7,391 graduates and expresses deep appreciation to our faculty who have skillfully taught, nurtured, guided and mentored their students through the unprecedented challenges of the past year.

Looking ahead, see the newly updated Teaching Faculty website and the summer and early fall Faculty Training Opportunities offered by CTL and its Academic Technology and Ecampus partners. These free professional development opportunities are designed to help you prepare to teach even more effectively in coming terms.

Many faculty have been reflecting on what they’ve learned from teaching remotely and how they can apply successful techniques and tools in their future teaching on campus. For inspiration, view your colleagues from 6 OSU colleges and OSU-Cascades speaking about The Future of Teaching: What We’ll Carry Forward in a new CTL video.


Carry Forward Video on screenHave a restorative summer break and contact CTL whenever we can be of support!

 

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RAP ON: Does Social Media Ease the Stress of Finals or INCREASE IT?

About the Author: Amara Bradetich is a graduate student in the School of Public Health and Human Services at Oregon State University. Studying in the Human Development and Family Science area, her research focuses on how maternal stress during pregnancy affects child self regulation and sensory processing in early childhood. This post is part of our series of Research Advancing Pedagogy (RAP) blogs, designed to share pedagogical research from across the disciplines in a pragmatic format.

Scrolling through Instagram, watching videos on TikTok, or FaceTiming friends have become popular activities in the past few decades, and increasingly so in the past year of lockdowns and remote learning. But how do these activities influence academic achievement of undergraduate students?  This is what Sternberg and colleagues (2020) explored in their study of the effects of procrastinatory social media usage on student anxiety about finals. Prior research has shown procrastination to be a self-regulatory strategy for about one-fifth of the adult population and half of the student population (Rozental & Carlbring, 2014). This pervasive strategy for coping with feeling overwhelmed may have detrimental effects on students’ test anxiety when using social media as a way to procrastinate studying for finals.

What did they do?

Sternberg and colleagues (2020) conducted a two-study investigation of the effects of procrastinatory Facebook usage on student anxiety while studying for tests. The first study collected longitudinal data on 51 undergraduate students during their real-life preparation for finals, including texted surveys students completed at six random times during the 3 days prior to a major exam on the amount of time they spent on Facebook and their feelings of anxiety and overall well-being. The second study used a laboratory exam context to manipulate the amount of time students spent on Facebook and how this influenced the participants’ anxiety. This study included 68 undergraduate students who completed a series of lab sessions that included answering surveys about their baseline levels of anxiety, were split into a control and experimental group, and given 20 minutes before a short intelligence test, with one group instructed to prepare for the test with access to the web and the other given free time.

What did they find?
In the first study, the authors found that increased Facebook usage before real-life exams increased the students’ levels of anxiety over the three days prior to the test. The second study found that Facebook usage led to anxiety only when it was used in place of studying. By splitting their participants into two groups and telling one to prepare and the other not to, they were able to identify if student anxiety is associated with Facebook use specifically when it is used in place of preparing for an exam. The authors used the two-study design as a means of providing evidence of a causal association between procrastinatory social media usage and increased anxiety before exams; the first study provided a strong correlation between Facebook usage and anxiety, and the second study provided causal evidence that Facebook usage in place of studying causes increased anxiety in students preparing for exams.

What does it mean for us?

This research is especially salient to us because of the increased remoteness of school, work, and socializing that has occurred over the past year. Students are having to be even more self-reliant for regulating their studying and schoolwork than ever before, while trying to find a balance and avoid distraction by the increasing popularity of social media. This study provides evidence of a causal association between Facebook usage and anxiety when preparing for an exam; this is important for educators to be aware of in order to provide support and strategies for students to avoid this tempting procrastinatory strategy. Students need to be aware of the detrimental impact on their mental health that social media can have, especially in relation to test preparation and their success in school. Students should set boundaries for their own social media use when preparing for finals or working to complete big assignments for class. They can set timers for when they do use social media to remind themselves to limit their usage, as well as delete the apps during busy times of the semester if they have a hard time avoiding the temptation.

References

Rozental, A., & Carlbring, P. (2014). Understanding and treating procrastination: A review of a common self-regulatory failure. Psychology, 5(13), 1489-1502. https://doi.org/10.4236/psych.2014.513160

Sternberg, N., Luria, R., Chandhok, S., Vickers, B., Kross, E., & Sheppes, G. (2020). When facebook and finals collide: procrastinatory social media usage predicts enhanced anxiety. Computers in Human Behavior, 109, 108. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2020.106358

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Summer Professional Development Opportunity

Trail and snow-capped mountains The remote teaching and learning experience during the past year has stimulated innovative ideas about ways to improve on-campus teaching. The path forward for teaching and learning in higher ed will continue to be both exciting and challenging.

You’re invited to join a faculty learning community this summer to explore these lessons learned and apply new strategies to advance your teaching skills. This small, supportive cohort will focus on applying effective practices for skillful use of ed tech and for integrating synchronous and asynchronous learning activities in all your Corvallis and Cascades campus courses.

The faculty learning community, facilitated by CTL and Academic Technology, will have a blended format, meeting 4 times on Zoom as well as interacting online in Canvas. The time commitment is 1 to 2 hrs. per week for 8 weeks.

OSU instructors and tenured/tenure-track faculty who teach credit-based Cascades and Corvallis campus courses are eligible to apply. All levels of teaching experience and ed tech skills are welcome. Funding is provided.

See the Call for Proposals for the streamlined (10 min.) proposal process, then apply by June 1.

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Wellbeing in the University Context: The Role of Assessment

About the Author: Madeline Nichols is a doctoral student in the College of Public Health and Human Sciences at Oregon State University. Studying in the Human Development and Family Studies program, her research broadly focuses on how older adults and adults in midlife understand, process, and regulate their emotions, and how those emotional competencies intersect with sociocultural factors, such as race or gender. This post is part of our series of Research Advancing Pedagogy (RAP) blogs, designed to share pedagogical research from across the disciplines in a pragmatic format.

Psychological wellbeing is especially important in the university context, with the relationship between learning and mental health proving to be bidirectional – that is, students’ learning impacts their mental health, and student’s mental health impacts future learning (Pascoe et al., 2020). Higher education relies on the assessment of that learning (QAA, 2018) and the consideration for the wellbeing of students should include an examination of how wellbeing is impacted by assessment as well as how wellbeing impacts assessment itself (Pascoe et al., 2020). Jones and colleagues met with students and staff at universities across the UK to consider this relationship between assessment and wellbeing and to make staff- and student-informed recommendations for considerations in assessment design.

What did they do? This qualitative study used focus groups of university staff and student panels. University staff contributed their perceptions of the balance between student learning and wellbeing at their university, while students were asked about the culture and environment of their university as well as mental health. In total, 33 staff members and 65 students participated.

What did they find? Conversations with students and staff highlighted five tensions that may arise in assessment design and implementation.

1.   Challenge versus threat in assessment: The nature of assessment is to be challenging, to encourage critical thinking so as to evoke higher levels of learning. However, this challenge comes with a cost: subjective perceptions of assessments as threat instead of challenge can negatively impact their wellbeing, evidenced by one student’s contribution: “Doing badly in one exam [felt like] … the end of the world … [it] was terrifying.”

2.   Traditional versus novel assessment: Traditional forms of assessment, like structured exams, were seen as both too restrictive and anxiety-producing. One student said, “they tell you what to do… [and] there’s no opportunity to have your own initiative on anything.” However, both students and staff also acknowledged the higher faculty burden in creating more novel assessments, as well as the increased stress that may be associated with these forms of assessment depending on a student’s prior exposure to similar assessment types.

3.   Collaborative versus individual assessment: While traditional individual assessment may feel isolating, feedback suggests collaborative assessment brings its own challenges alongside its strengths. While some students find the skills assessed during collaboration to be more applicable to their future job, staff members “sometimes find that groupwork ups the pressure, because if they’re in incompatible groups or there are issues going on, somebody’s not attending, it puts more strain on the others.”

4.   Ideal versus practical assessment: Both students and staff agree that practical assessments may not always be ideal, but that a university-focus on creating ideal assessments negatively affect staff wellbeing. One faculty member noted that they’d “seen the stress levels with the staff go up,” and students recognized that ““in practice, it’s really difficult.”

5.   Giving feedback versus receiving criticism: Giving personalized, detailed feedback is ideal, but can be tricky to accomplish depending on student: instructor ratios. It’s when this feedback crosses the line to criticism that students note a problem: “Sometimes [the feedback is] not constructive, it’s just criticism … and I think that affects people’s mental health.”

What does that mean for us? It seems like there’s no happy medium, right? Not necessarily – although there’s not one solution for everyone, Jones and colleagues’ work highlights the importance of considering staff and student experiences, as well as the factors of familiarity and feedback, in assessment design to minimize its negative effects on students’ mental health. Knowing these key tensions, though, can help inform future approaches to assessment design that may be more protective of the mental health of students, but these designs will need to be critiqued by students and staff alike to examine their functionality within individual contexts.

References

Jones, E., Priestly, M., Brewster, L., Wilbraham, S.J., Hughes, G., & Spanner, L. (2021). Student wellbeing and assessment in higher education: the balancing act. Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, 46(3), 438-450. https://doi.org/10.1080/02602938.2020.1782344

Pascoe, M., Hetrick, S. & Parker, A. (2020). “The impact of stress on students in secondary school and higher education.” International Journal of Adolescence and Youth 25 (1): 104–112. https://doi.org/10.1080/02673843.2019.1596823. QAA [Quality Assurance Alliance] (2018).

UK Quality Code, Advice and Guidance: Assessment. https://www.qaa.ac.uk/en/quality-code/advice-and-guidance/assessment

 

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Center for Teaching & Learning Peer Supporter 2020-21 Showcase

You are invited! Friday, May 21, 9:00-9:50 am.

Join the Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL) in our Peer Supporter Showcase. During the 2020-21 academic year, the Office of Undergraduate Education with funding from the Provost, established the Peer Teaching Resources & Support Program coordinated by the CTL. Peer Supporters in colleges across the campus provided pedagogical professional development, resources and support to instructional faculty in remote and blended teaching. In this year-end gathering, the CTL is proud to highlight the success of this pilot program. Join us for this celebration of how OSU Kept Teaching. Welcome by Vice Provost Alix Gitelman.

Register now! Friday, May 21, 2021. 9:00 -9:50 am

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Self-Regulation in College

About the Author: Amara Bradetich is a graduate student in the School of Public Health and Human Services at Oregon State University. Studying in the Human Development and Family Science area, her research focuses on how maternal stress during pregnancy affects child self-regulation and sensory processing in early childhood. This post is part of our series of Research Advancing Pedagogy (RAP) blogs, designed to share pedagogical research from across the disciplines in a pragmatic format. 

Taking a deep breath before an exam, focusing while writing a paper, and staying home to study instead of hanging out with friends are all examples of regulatory skills being put to use by college students. Unknown to most undergraduates, the ability to inhibit their impulses, calm their emotions, and sustain attention on a single task are vital to their academic success. These self-regulation skills, also known as executive functions, begin developing in childhood and influence the learning and development of all people (McClelland et al., 2014). This was the focus of Travis and Bunde’s (2020) article. They explored the relationship between self-efficacy, satisfaction of basic needs, and stress on college students’ GPAs, persistence, and satisfaction with school.

What did they do? Travis and Bunde (2020) surveyed 383 undergraduate students from each university department at a public university in South Carolina. The participants rated their stress level, self-confidence in their academic ability, satisfaction of basic needs, intentions to transfer, and satisfaction with education and experience at that college at two points during the fall semester. The university supplied the authors with the students’ GPAs and hours withdrawn at the end of the semester.

What did they find? The authors found support for their hypotheses, namely that the elements of self-regulation studied affect the students’ academic success in college. The big takeaways: 1) Students who reported higher self-efficacy, lower stress ratings, and higher need satisfaction had higher GPA scores, more satisfaction with school, decreased intention to transfer, and fewer hours withdrawn. 2) When students felt their needs were being met, they had greater intent to persist beyond the effects of high stress or low academic self-efficacy.

What does it mean for us? This research highlights the role of self-regulation skills in student outcomes and perceptions in college. This indicates not only the connection between self-regulation support and academic success, but the vitality of including self-regulation in educational policy and school design/research. Specifically, this study suggests that the identification and removal of certain stressors may improve academic performance and socioemotional outcomes. The findings also indicate the need to be mindful of basic human needs when creating and implementing achievable academic challenges.

Professors need to be aware of students’ experiences, stress levels, basic needs, and regulatory abilities in order to better support their learning and achievement in class. Although this may seem like a tall task, starting by simply asking students how they are doing at the beginning of each class, reaching out to students who do not attend class or turn work in late, or teaching students about good study habits are ways to open the door to supporting students’ success through regulatory skills.

References

McClelland, M. M., Cameron, C. E., Duncan, R., Bowles, R. P., Acock, A. C., Miao, A., & Pratt, M. (2014). Predictors of early growth in academic achievement: The head-toes-knees-shoulders task. Frontiers in Psychology, 5, 599.

Travis, J., & Bunde, J. (2020). Self-regulation into college: The influence of self-efficacy, need satisfaction, and stress on GPA, persistence, and satisfaction. Current Psychology. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12144-020-01091-7

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Distance Learning is Hard – Here’s How to Make it Easier for Students

About the Author: Madeline Nichols is a doctoral student in the College of Public Health and Human Studies at Oregon State University. Studying in the Human Development and Family Studies program, her research broadly focuses on how older adults and adults in midlife understand, process, and regulate their emotions, and how those emotional competencies intersect with sociocultural factors, such as race or gender.

Distance Learning is Hard – Here’s How to Make it Easier for Students

COVID-19 has been rough for everyone across a number of important life domains – whether we think of our social relationships, work, or education, the pandemic has caused us to adapt to accommodate change within these key aspects of our lives (Settersten et al., 2020).  Though we’ve all experienced changes, the need for education and learning has been ongoing, and has been one of the adaptations at the forefront of debate with the shift to online learning.

With 1.3 billion students affected by school closures worldwide (UNESCO, 2020a), many experienced detriments to their psychological wellbeing in the form of increased stress and mental health concerns (UNESCO, 2020b). What can we, as educators, do to support the psychological wellbeing of our students with ongoing distance learning practices? Holzer and colleagues suggest that it might be as simple as providing individualized support and feedback, encouraging the use of daily routines to add structure to learning, and using synchronous sessions to reflect on learning and foster community.

What did they do?

Across two studies conducted in Austria and Finland, 7,724 students filled out a questionnaire assessing their competence, autonomy, social connectedness, goal setting and planning, positive emotions, and intrinsic learning motivation. These questionnaires were completed in Spring 2020 – Austrian students participated from April 7 to April 24, shortly after universities closed on March 16 and Finnish students participated from April 29 to June 2, as universities transitioned to distance learning on March 18.

What did they find?

Three of the completed assessments – competence, autonomy, and social connectedness – were deemed basic needs that should be connected to psychological wellbeing by increasing positive emotions and intrinsic learning motivation. Results indicated that both competence and social connectedness were positive predictors of positive emotions in Austria and Finland. Autonomy was a negative predictor of positive emotion for Austrian students, but a positive predictor of positive emotion for Finnish students. However, only competence had a moderate to large effect size in both samples, while autonomy and social connectedness only yielded small effects. Both competence and autonomy were shown to positively predict intrinsic learning motivation in Austria, and all three basic needs were predictors of intrinsic learning motivation in Finland. Finally, the findings regarding the effects of goal setting and planning on positive emotions and intrinsic motivation were mixed – goal setting and planning interacted with autonomy to promote positive emotion in Austria, while competence was key for this interaction in Finland.

What does this mean for us?

Though this study was completed at the beginning of the shift to distance learning, its findings are still relevant as we continue to navigate the rest of our time teaching online and in beginning to transition to in-person classes in the coming year. Promoting these basic needs in our classrooms can help support the psychological wellbeing of our students – and it only takes three easy steps. First, creating individualized learning opportunities, be that through the increased availability of instructors in office hours, or through more individualized feedback, can promote competence. Second, encouraging students to set goals for themselves and creating routines or plans for their learning equips students not only for distance learning, but also in creating good study habits in the long run. Finally, using synchronous sessions now, and promoting group work either online or in-person in the coming terms, can help increase social connectedness by fostering a learning community within the classroom, as well as providing space to reflect on successes and failures in the students’ learning efforts.

Though it may feel like the end is near, we still have a few weeks of distance learning and will have to adapt to in-person learning soon. Minimizing the negative effects on psychological wellbeing that these circumstances may have is crucial in promoting learning and fostering a positive environment for our students.

 figure

Figure 1. Structural equation model predicting positive emotion and intrinsic learning motivation (Study 1: Model 11).

Note. This structural equation model predicts positive emotion and learning motivation from basic psychological needs, with moderating effects of self-regulated learning. Statistics are standardized regression coefficients. Dotted lines represent nonsignificant relations.

 figure

Figure 2. Structural equation model predicting positive emotion and intrinsic learning motivation (Study 2: Model 12).

Note. This structural equation model predicts positive emotion and learning motivation from basic psychological needs, with moderating effects of self-regulated learning. Statistics are standardized regression coefficients. Dotted lines represent nonsignificant relations.

References

Holzer, J., Lüftenegger, M., Korlat, S., Pelika, E., Salmela-Aro, K., Spiel, C., & Schober, B. (2021). Higher education in times of COVID-19: University students’ basic need satisfaction, self-regulated learning, and well-being. AERA Open, 7(1), 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1177/23328584211003164

Settersten, R.A. Jr., Bernardi, L., Härkönen, J., Antonucci, T., Dykstra, P.A., Heckhausen, J., Kuh, D., Mayer, K.U., Moen, P., Mortimer, J.T., Mulder, C.H., Smeeding, T.M., van der Lippe, T., Hagestad, G.O., Kohli, M., Levy, R., Schoon, I., & Thomson, E. (2020). Understanding the effects of Covid-19 through a life course lens. Advances in Life Course Research, 45, 1-11. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.alcr.2020.100360

UNESCO. (2020a). COVID-19 impact on education. https://en.unesco.org/covid19/educationresponse

UNESCO. (2020b). Nurturing the social and emotional wellbeing of children and young people during crises. UNESCO COVID- 19 Education Response. https://unesdoc.unesco.org/ark:/48223/ pf0000373271

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Jump into a Summer Faculty Learning Community

Austin Hall and LINC plazaThe Summer ’21 Blended Faculty Learning Community, sponsored by CTL and Academic Technology, is designed to help you advance your teaching skills.

This small, supportive cohort will focus on applying effective practices for skillful use of educational technology and for integrating synchronous and asynchronous learning activities.

Participants will explore and develop solutions to self-identified teaching challenges. This cross-disciplinary learning community will meet via Zoom as well as interacting online in Canvas.

OSU instructors and tenured/tenure-track faculty who teach credit-based Cascades and Corvallis campus courses are eligible to apply. All levels of teaching experience and ed tech skills are welcome. Funding is provided and participants will receive a copy of Derek Bruff’s Intentional Tech.

Streamlined proposal process: See the Call for Proposals and submit your brief proposal by May 16.

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Sign up for an Engaging Learners with Instructional Media Workshop

Green GrassExplore how instructional media can enhance student learning in all teaching modalities. Discover ways to make your lecture videos more engaging and effective with in-video quizzing.

The Faculty Media Center and CTL invite all OSU teaching faculty and GTAs to attend an interactive one-hour workshop.

When: Either Wednesday, Apr. 28 at 2 p.m. or Thursday, Apr. 29 at 10 a.m.

Where: Register now and we’ll send you the Zoom link the day before the workshop.

Questions: Contact the Faculty Media Center.

We look forward to seeing you on the 28th or 29th!

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