Nature will bear the closest inspection. She invites us to lay our eye level with her smallest leaf, and take an insect view of its plain.

Henry David Thoreau

Grateful for your Commitment and Passion

In a year filled with tremendous challenges, we extend our deep gratitude to the metro area OSU Master Gardener volunteers for your generous dedication and passion to serve the community as a garden educator.

With our in-person community outreach put on hold, you stepped up to expand your horticulture knowledge. You learned the art of Zoom attending our metro Master Gardener Garden Webinar Series en masse, Chapter Lecture/Speaker Series, and other OSU MG continuing education opportunities.  You have shown your strong commitment to garden education rooted in science!

Master Gardener Will Hughes with the produce he and Kathy Krentz grew for donation to a community food bank.

The pandemic did not hold back Master Gardeners from serving their community.  You reached out to your neighbors and fellow Master Gardeners to check on their well-being.  You grew vegetables at home to donate to food banks.  Even with the challenge of a severely shortened season, Chapters grew a remarkable amount of produce at their community demonstration gardens, for those experiencing food insecurity.

Master Gardeners juggled work from home, managed home schooling, cared and watched out for family, neighbors, and friends; and served as dedicated front-line essential workers.  Your efforts and care confirm your commitment to serving your community!  We are grateful to you all!


2020 Survey Response

Thank you to all those perennial Master Gardeners who took the time to answer the brief survey that Marcia McIntyre sent out in October.  Even though we have suspended annual volunteer requirements, we appreciate you reporting your volunteer and continuing education hours.  Plus, the remarkable amount of produce you grew and donated to area food banks.  This will enable us to report all your valuable contributions to OSU.  Thank you also for submitting your signed Conditions of Volunteer Service.  Now you are ready for our 2021 Elevated Master Gardener Training (see details in article below)!

Utmost appreciation to our class of 2020 for your patience, excitement and passion for learning and community service!  We don’t need you to submit a report this year – but please be sure to answer the survey Marcia McIntyre sent out in October, which offers three easy methods for signing the Conditions of Volunteer Service. A signed and submitted form has you ready to participate in our 2021 activities.

To those Perennial Master Gardeners and those in the Class of 2020 who have not responded to the survey, please take the time to respond by Friday, November 13th, so we know you are committed to continuing in the Master Gardener program in 2021.


Our Garden Webinar Series Continues

Adult spotted lantern fly. Lawrence Barringer, Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture

Our metro area Garden Webinar Series continues in November and December, with two special presentations from Jessica Rendon, PhD., from the Oregon Department of Agriculture.  Jessica will highlight invasive insect species that are important for Oregonians to know about, including the Asian giant hornet, Japanese beetle, and Southern pink moth, to name just a few. 

Friday, November 20th, 1PM
Part 1 – Invasive Species Threatening Oregon! What to Look For and How to Help. The first session will cover Gypsy Moth, the Again Giant Hornet, Jumping Worms, and the Southern Pink Moth. To register for Part I, go to… https://beav.es/oBh

Friday, December 4th, 1PM
Part II – Invasive Species Threatening Oregon! What to Look For and How to Help. This session will cover the Japanese Beetle, the Spotted Lanternfly, the Houdini Fly, Lily and Viburnum Leaf Beetles, and finally the Allium Leafminer! To register for Part II, go to… https://beav.es/oHU


Celebrate Master Gardener Week in Review

It was wonderful that so many Master Gardeners were able to participate in the state-wide Celebrate Master Gardener Week last month.  We hope you enjoyed the Film Festival, film discussions, and Insect Trivia night.  We are grateful to you all for the tremendous dedication you bring to the OSU Master Gardener Program.  You are amazing! 

In case you missed either…below is a our state-wide thank you video from OSU Extension faculty and staff, along with State-wide Master Gardener Coordinator, Dr. Gail Langellotto’s annual Master Gardener Program Update.

Master Gardener Program Update – with Gail Langellotto, Ph.D

Thank you Master Gardeners!


Master Gardeners Sowing and Growing in 2021

State-wide OSU Master Gardener faculty and staff are busy developing engaging, interactive curriculum for our 2021 Elevated Master Gardener training. This exciting new programing will be offered to both Perennial Master Gardeners and our Class of 2020 trainees, around the state. This is an opportunity for Master Gardeners to enhance your gardening know-how “via a combination of self-paced learning and live webinars and online conversations with OSU experts.” Learn more about this innovative new curriculum, that will be offered starting in January of 2021 HERE.  Be sure to submit your 2020-2021 Conditions of Volunteer Service form now, so you are ready to go in January.


Webinar Recordings Work with Your Schedule

Do you have a schedule conflict with an upcoming webinar?  Don’t despair!  We are posting recordings of many of our webinars in the days following the presentation.  Recently fellow Master Gardener, Dennis Brown, kindly inspired us with tips for what to do in our vegetable gardens in the fall. 

To see Dennis’ Fall Vegetable Gardening Tips Webinar, along with other past webinars visit: https://beav.es/4FR


Fine-tune Your Garden Know-how

The metro area Master Gardener Program has two great opportunities for you to fine-tune your garden know-how; the Tri-county MG Study Group and the Washington Co. Master Gardener Chapter’s Learning Group. Consider joining-in to expand your garden knowledge in the company of fellow Master Gardeners.  Both groups are currently meeting via Zoom and are open to current Master Gardeners and 2020 Master Gardener trainees.

Photo courtesy of Elizabeth Price

Tri-county MG Study Group
The
Tri-county MG Study Group is dedicated to taking a deep dive into a range of horticulture subjects and gardener practices.  The group meets twice a month on the first and third Mondays, from 1pm to 3pm.  The first Monday session is a fun and interactive ‘Show and Tell’ where attendees can bring one insect or plant for identification, or a garden triumph or problem to share with the group.  Group members assist with identification or problem solving. The second Monday session takes a fine focus on a specific horticulture subject.  Participants receive a study guide prior to the session in preparation.  Tentative upcoming 3rd Monday topics will cover ‘Group Diagnostics’, ‘What does reliable, research-based, peer review mean’, ‘Household Insects’, ‘Pine ID’,  ‘Verticillium Wilt’, ‘Plant Viruses’, ‘Plant Rust’, ‘Soils’, ‘Rain Gardens’, and ‘metro area stinging wasps.’ 

Interested participants can email: tricountymgstudygroup@gmail.com

Washington Co. Master Gardener’s Learning Group
The Learning Group is organized by the Washington County Master Gardener Association to assist Master Gardeners in building their knowledge-base to answer client gardening questions with confidence, in a fun, relaxed setting.  Topics covered are based on common and seasonal questions that Master Gardeners are often asked at office helplines and Master Gardener tabling events. 

Sessions are offered once a month via Zoom, the third Thursday of the month, 1:30pm to 3:30pm.  Participants receive a learning guide prior to the interactive learning session. Upcoming session topics include: raised-bed, container gardens, soil and soil testing, and research techniques for Master Gardeners.

Interested participants should contact: Sandy Japely, sjapely@gmail.com


Our November and December Garden Checklist

Fall provides lots of opportunities to accomplish garden tasks. Plant spring bulbs, renew mulch, clean and sharpen tools, and embrace leaving the leaves! Find it all in our November and December garden checklist…

By Margaret Bayne, OSU Extension Service Staff-retired, OSU Master Gardener

Cover of OSU Publication EM 9297
New OSU publication EM 9297

Asian Giant Hornet: A potential threat to honeybee colonies in Oregon
New OSU publication outlines identification, life cycle, and predatory habits of the Asian giant hornet (Vespa mandarinia).  Along with recommendations for reporting a suspected sighting in the Pacific Northwest. (Ellen Topitzhofer, Chris Hedstrom, Priyadarshini Chakrabarti, Andony Melathopoulos, Silvia I. Rondon, Gail A. Langellotto-Rhodaback, Ramesh R. Sagili) https://bit.ly/2SPTLAP

Why Are Plants Green? To Reduce the Noise in Photosynthesis. “Plants ignore the most energy-rich part of sunlight because stability matters more than efficiency, according to a new model of photosynthesis.” (Rodrigo Perez Ortega, Quantamagazine.org) https://bit.ly/2ZuispX

Spiders, cobwebs proliferate this time of year; here’s why (plus fascinating spider myths and info.) (Oregonianlive.com) https://bit.ly/2DR7gw4

View of the Columbia River Gorge, with haze caused from forest fire.
Columbia Gorge Fire, PNW Disease Handbook

Air Pollution: Ozone. (Jay Pschdeit, PNW Disease Handbook) https://bit.ly/2ZpJ5fV

Volcanic Rock Yields a New Kind of Insecticide for Mosquitoes. (John P. Roche Entomologytoday.org) https://bit.ly/2ZtIOZn

A Field Guide to Finding Cool Moths. (Ken Keffer, blog.nature.org) https://bit.ly/33jN5jb

Bumblebees Are Larger in Cities, Study Finds-Bigger bees have larger brains and are better pollinators. (Mary Jo DiLonardo, treehugger.com) https://bit.ly/3c1NLOh

Moth Fur Is the Ultimate Acoustic Armor. It muffles the clicks of ravenous, echolocating bats. (Matthew Taub, atlasobscura.com) https://bit.ly/35vpE9o

Yellowjacket
Yellowjacket, OSU

Be Yellowjacket Aware. (Amanda Brenner, Lauren Grad, OSU) https://bit.ly/2FpbDyW

Female Dragonflies Play Dead To Avoid Having Sex, New Video Shows.  Researchers believe this is a survival tactic which is rare- “Sexual death feigning.” (Annie Garau, allthatsinteresting.com) https://bit.ly/3hiQljD

A 194-year-old apple tree, the matriarch of the Northwest apple industry, has died. (CNN via www.channel3000.com) https://bit.ly/3iohhzR

Selecting quality trees from the nursery. (Edward F. Gilman, and Laura Sadowski, UF/IFAS Extension, Gainesville, FL) https://bit.ly/2RlfLTn

Some like it hot… but most do not: How high temperatures delay pollination and ripening. (John Porter, Gardenerprofessors.com) https://bit.ly/2FksyCY

Squash blossom with sun shining on the blossoms.
Squash blossom, OSU

Bumblebees hate pumpkin pollen, which may help pumpkins (Krishna Ramanujan, Cornell U) https://bit.ly/33WLx08

Natter’s Notes
Jean R. Natter, OSU Master Gardener

As I write this in early September, fires are raging in much of Oregon and air quality ranges between unhealthy and hazardous due to nearby fires or at a distance by smoke plumes. //Unfortunately, due to turn around time for the metro MG Newsletter, you won’t receive this advice until long after it is the most useful. //But perhaps, during a future event, you’ll recall the most critical guidelines to help protect you and yours.

Perhaps the single best link for info is https://www.airnow.gov/ where there’s nearly endless info under the headings of Air Quality Information (AQI) & Health; Fires; Maps & Data; Education; International; and Resources. When the Home Page opens, click “Allow Location Access” to receive an air quality rating from the sensor closest to where you live.

Let’s review a number of other helpful links about smoke, health safety, and gardening.

The risks of particulate matter in smoke

“Particulate matter contains microscopic solids or liquid droplets that are so small that they can be inhaled and cause serious health problems. Some particles less than 10 micrometers in diameter can get deep into your lungs and some may even get into your bloodstream. Of these, particles less than 2.5 micrometers in diameter. . . pose the greatest risk to health.” (https://www.cdc.gov/disasters/covid-19/wildfire_smoke_covid-19.html)

Note that only an N95 mask or respirator will protect your lungs from the smallest particles in wildfire smoke.

– Guidelines for working indoors or outdoors

Wait until the air quality reaches healthy levels to begin cleanup because disturbed ash particles can enter, and damage, your lungs.

– Ash disposal 

“Collected ash may be disposed of in the regular trash. Ash should be stored in plastic bags or other containers to prevent it from being stirred up. If you suspect hazardous waste, including asbestos, is present, contact your local hazardous waste authorities regarding appropriate disposal. Avoid washing ash into storm drains.” (https://www.airnow.gov/publications/wildfire-smoke-guide/wildfire-smoke-protect-yourself-from-ash/

– What should I do about wildfire ash covering my yard and garden: “. . . a thin dusting of ash on plants (can still see the green color) isn’t likely to have long term effects on plant health before our fall rains wash it away, so no need to remove.

“Focus instead on clearing heavier amounts of ash from plants that you regularly come into contact through gardening activities, that are near windows, doors or air handling units, food producing plants, or plants that are of high value to you.

Don’t wash the ash down the storm drain. Instead direct the rinse water into low traffic grassy or ornamental areas (away from your fruit & veggie garden) which will act as a natural filter. Large amounts of ash can be gently swept into a pile, bagged in plastic sacks, sealed, and thrown away “ https://extension.oregonstate.edu/ask-expert/featured/what-should-i-do-about-wildfire-ash-covering-my-yard-garden

– Take precautions when wildfire ash lands on fruits and vegetables: “Avoid going outside to harvest while smoke lingers.” Rinse twice, once outdoors and again in the kitchen sink. If the produce is near a burned building, potential health-affecting toxins may be present. Peel produce like tomatoes, apples and root crops and strip the outer leaves of lettuces and other greens. For a more thorough cleaning, soak vegetables and fruits in a 10% white vinegar solution (one teaspoon vinegar to three cups water), which can lift soil particles off vegetables like kale, Swiss chard, savoy cabbage and fruit like peaches, apricots and nectarines.”  https://today.oregonstate.edu/news/take-precautions-when-wildfire-ash-falls-fruits-and-vegetables

– Indoor Air Filtration: If you have central air conditioning, turn the control to “fan.” If you lack central air, consider a portable filter; the best kinds use HEPA filtration.https://www.consumerreports.org/air-purifiers/best-air-purifiers-for-wildfire-smoke/

– Backyard Poultry in Fire-Affected Areas (UCCE; 2017): “In addition to all the destruction and inhalation of smoke associated with the recent fires in Northern California, one of the unfortunate legacies remaining are chemical contamination of land, soil and water. . . . Since backyard chickens are food animals with respect to egg and meat production, there is a risk that some of these substances may be ingested by chickens and deposited inside eggs which are then laid by the chickens. . . .  Unfortunately, there is limited scientific data on this issue. . . .”

At the time of this blog entry (2017), UCCE had several stringent recommendations concerning backyard poultry, including lab testing of the eggs. (https://ucanr.edu/blogs/blogcore/postdetail.cfm?postnum=25700)

– Produce Safety After Urban Wildfire (UCCE; 2018): “Plant samples DO NOT show extensive contamination of produce exposed to wildfire smoke, and our findings suggest a low health risk from ingesting produce exposed to wildfire smoke.” (https://ucanr.edu/blogs/blogcore/postdetail.cfm?postnum=28737)

– Safe Ash Clean-Up After a Fire: The greatest risk if from tiny invisible dust particles. Avoid cleaning up until air quality improves and it’s safe to be outdoors. (https://www.ourair.org/ash-cleanup/)

– Fire Recovery Guide: What to do with your land after a wildfire.(California Native Plant Society; 2019; https://www.cnps.org/give/priority-initiatives/fire-recovery)

– How to stay safe in a smoky pandemic: A Q&A. https://www.opb.org/article/2020/09/14/how-to-stay-safe-wildfires-pandemic-oregon-air-quality-masks/

Jewel colored autumn leaves on tree.

Winter is an etching, spring a watercolor, summer an oil painting and autumn a mosaic of them all. 

— Stanley Horowitz 

Help Us to Report Your Generous Service

Although volunteer requirements are waived for 2020 due to the pandemic, we still would like you to tell us about your service hours so that we can celebrate and share your contributions with OSU.  In lieu of submitting a volunteer log this year, please complete the brief survey that Marcia McIntyre sent via email earlier this fall.  No need to submit a volunteer log sheet this year.  Via the survey, you will simply report your total Program and Partner hours, along with your Continuing Education Hours and any produce donations you made to area food banks. 

Please answer the volunteer log survey no later than, Thursday, October 15, 2020.

For our 2020 Master Gardener trainees we are extending the deadline for your training requirements until September 30, 2021. We are looking forward to a time when we can introduce you to a wide variety of volunteer activities where you can apply and expand your gardening knowledge.


Master Gardeners Sowing and Growing in 2021

Seedlings sprouting in small white pot.

So, what’s sowing and growing for OSU Master Gardeners in 2021?  We are pleased to share the news that exciting new programing will be offered to Perennial Master Gardeners around the state, including our class of 2020 trainees.  This is an opportunity for Master Gardeners to enhance your gardening know-how “via a combination of self-paced learning and live webinars and online conversations with OSU experts.” Learn more about this innovative new curriculum, that will be offered starting in January of 2021 HERE.

Celebrate Master Gardener Week
October 26-30, 2020

Image of clover blossoms, with bees. Overlaid with 'Celebrate Master Gardener WEEK' 'Oct 26 - 30, 2020'

Recognition and celebration of Oregon’s Master Gardener Volunteers

In a year when you were needed more than ever, Oregon’s Master Gardeners rose to the multiple challenges of 2020 in simply amazing ways. You made it work and took it online. You stayed connected and identified insects, plants, and soil problems all in new ways. When Oregonians needed advice and education like never before, Master Gardeners were there for
them. You’ve even mastered the Zoom goodbye wave and how to unmute. You grew more Oregon gardeners than ever before. It’s time to say thank you!


Celebrate Master Gardener Week
October 26-30, 2020

Thank you Master Gardeners and welcome to a week-long celebration of YOU!

Events include:

Film Festival featuring three film viewings, discussions, and Q&As with filmmakers and/or local experts.

State of the Master Gardener Program Address with Dr. Gail Langellotto, Statewide Master Gardener Program Coordinator

Beneficial Insect Trivia Game and Discussion

This free celebration is designed as an online opportunity to connect through the learning management platform OSU uses for online classes.

Registration for Master Gardeners will be opening on October 19th, watch for details to come.


Celebrate Master Gardener Week Schedule Film Festival

During these dates registered participants will have special VIP access to view three films.

Promotional poster for the film Love Bugs. Photo of subject of the film. A man and a woman standing with their insect collection.
The Love Bugs
  • October 20 – 27, 2020: The Love Bugs 
    Over the course of 60 years, entomologists Charlie and Lois O’Brien amassed a collection of more than 1 million insects from nearly 70 countries —the largest private collection in the world with a value of $10 million dollars. But as Charlie’s battle with Parkinson’s becomes increasingly pronounced, he and Lois, 90, make the difficult decision to give away their drawers full of iridescent weevils and planthoppers. This humorous and poignant film explores the love of Nature—and the Nature of Love—and what it means to devote oneself completely to both.

  • October 21-28, 2020: Land Grab: The Movie
    Land Grab is the story of an eccentric finance mogul’s dream to create the world’s largest urban farm in his hometown of Detroit and the political firestorm he unintentionally ignited by announcing that he would spend $30 million of his own fortune to build this farm in one of the most economically devastated neighborhoods of the bankrupt Motor City.

  • October 22-29, 2020: The Five Seasons: The Gardens of Piet Oudolf 
    After completing a feature documentary on New York’s High Line, award-winning filmmaker Thomas Piper met the inspirational designer and plantsman, Piet Oudolf, and the idea for a new project was born. The documentary, FIVE SEASONS: The Gardens of Piet Oudolf, immerses viewers in Oudolf’s work and takes us inside his creative process, from his beautifully abstract sketches, to theories on beauty, to the ecological implications of his ideas.

After viewing the films, join together via Zoom with the filmmakers and/or local experts for discussion.

  • October 26, 2020 at 6pm PDT. Facilitated discussion of The Love Bugs.
  • October 27, 2020 at 6pm PDT. Facilitated discussion of Land Grab: The Movie. 
  • October 28, 2020 at 6pm PDT. Facilitated discussion of The Five Seasons: The Gardens of Piet Oudolf. 

Note: Pre-registration is required/Zoom webinars have a limit of 500 people.


State of the Statewide Master Gardener Program Address

  • October 29, 2020 at 6pm PDT. Join Statewide Master Gardener Program Coordinator Gail Langellotto, for a livestreamed update on the Master Gardener Program in Oregon. The presentation will review recent accomplishments and points of pride, current challenges and opportunities, and an overview of what is to come in 2021.

Note: Pre-registration is required/Zoom webinars have a limit of 500 people.


Beneficial Insect Trivia Game and Discussion

Green Lacewing insect.
Green Lacewing, C. nigricornis adult – Photo credit: Jim Moore, bugguide.net
  • October 30, 2020 at 6pm PDT. Put your insect knowledge to the test with this fun and interactive trivia tournament hosted by OSU’s Klamath County horticulture faculty member Nicole Sanchez. The ultimate gardening edutainment experience!

Note: We’ll be using both Zoom and Slido. Pre-registration is required and is limited to 200 people. Study up beforehand if you’re feeling competitive:

https://utahpests.usu.edu/ipm/ou-files/pdfs/alfalfa-beneficials_pests.pdf

https://extension.oregonstate.edu/sites/default/files/documents/9591/potatopests.pdf

http://npic.orst.edu/envir/beneficial/index.html

https://catalog.extension.oregonstate.edu/em9289

https://catalog.extension.oregonstate.edu/ec1549


Webinar Recordings Work with Your Schedule

Screen shot of webinar 'Vegetable Gardening Tips for Fall' with image of pumpkin. Thumbnail image of presenter - a man wearing a cap.

Do you have a schedule conflict with an upcoming webinar?  Don’t despair!  We are posting recordings of many of our webinars in the days following the presentation.  Recently fellow Master Gardener, Dennis Brown, kindly inspired us with tips for what to do in our vegetable gardens in the fall. 

To see Dennis’ Fall Vegetable Gardening Tips Webinar, along with other past webinars visit: https://beav.es/4FR


Garden Webinar Series Continues

Several Japanese beetles on a leaf that has scattered holes.
Japanese beetles
Photo: U.S. Department of Agriculture

Our metro area Garden Webinar Series continues in November, with a special presentation from Jessica Rendon, PhD., from the Oregon Department of Agriculture.  Jessica will be highlight invasive insects species that are important for Oregonians to know about, including the Asian giant hornet, Japanese beetle, and Southern pink moth, to name just a few.

Friday, November 20th, 1PM
Invasive Species Threatening Oregon! What to Look For and How to Help. For webinar details and to register go to… https://beav.es/oBh


Our October Garden Checklist

It’s time to overwinter vegetable beds, sheet mulch and plant garlic. Find inspiration in our October Garden Checklist.


‘A late summer garden has a tranquility found no other time of year’

William F. Longgood

As summer wanes, we hope that you have moments to find tranquility in a garden, solace listening to the cricket’s evening song, satisfaction eating a homegrown tomato or delight appreciating glorious summer blooms. Most especially we hope that you are yours are safe and well.


2020 Volunteer Requirements Waived

September is traditionally the end of our Master Gardener year (October 1 – September 30) when we collect reports of volunteer service hour.  As announced in previous newsletters, due to the pandemic, we are waiving all Perennial Master Gardener volunteer service requirements for 2020. 

Although volunteer requirements are waived, we still would like you to tell us about your service hours so that we can celebrate and share your contributions with OSU.  In lieu of submitting a volunteer log this year, please complete the brief survey which we will send out next week.  No need to submit a volunteer log sheet this year.  Via the survey, you will simply report your total Program and Partner hours, along with your Continuing Education Hours and any produce donations you made to area food banks.

For our 2020 Master Gardener trainees we are extending the deadline for your training requirements until September 30, 2021. We are looking forward to a time when we can introduce you to a wide variety of volunteer activities where you can apply and expand your gardening knowledge.


Master Gardeners Sowing and Growing in 2021

So, what’s sowing and growing for OSU Master Gardeners in 2021?  We are pleased to share the news that exciting new programing will be offered to Perennial Master Gardeners around the state, including our class of 2020 trainees.  This is an opportunity for Master Gardeners to enhance your gardening know-how “via a combination of self-paced learning and live webinars and online conversations with OSU experts.” Learn more about this innovative new curriculum, that will be offered starting in January of 2021 HERE.


Garden Webinar Series Continues

Our metro area Garden Webinar Series continues into September with two great offerings from the East Multnomah Soil and Water Conservation District.

Friday, September 11, 1PM
Naturescaping and Native Plants for Wildlife Learn the basics of designing a landscape to reduce water use, decrease stormwater runoff and improve habitat for local wildlife. We’ll cover the core concepts of Naturescaping, explore the many benefits of gardening with native plants, and highlight the characteristics and desired growing conditions of many favorite native trees, shrubs and groundcovers.

Photo courtesy of East Multnomah Soil and Water Conservation District

Friday, September 18, 1PM
Introduction to Raingardens and Stormwater Management Explore how rain gardens can help minimize the impact of urban stormwater pollution on local waterways and the wildlife that depend on them. You will walk away with an understanding of how a rain garden works, how and where to build one, as well as ideas for plant selection and rain garden maintenance tips.


Webinar Recordings Work with Your Schedule

Do you have a schedule conflict with an upcoming webinar?  Don’t despair.  We are posting recordings of many of our webinars in the days following the presentation.

Check out past webinars here:
https://media.oregonstate.edu/channel/channelid/161357322


Diversity Equity and Inclusion and Framework of Discovery

Since our statewide Master Gardener Program Coordinator, Gail Langellotto, and Master Gardener Outreach Coordinator, LeAnn Locher’s first blog post bringing increased attention to racial and social justice in Oregon’s Master Gardener Program, important conversations have started among staff, Master Gardener Chapters and Master Gardener volunteers.

Here in the metro area we have convened a Social and Racial Justice Advisory Committee, seeking guidance, as we take actionable steps for a more inclusive MG program.  One area Chapter has formed a Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI) working group to search out ways to improve DEI in the Chapter and its community outreach initiatives.

Two new blog posts from Gail and LeAnn are available. The first shares an update on the OSU Master Gardener Program’s focus on identifying “the benefits, barriers, opportunities, and impacts that are experienced by Master Gardener volunteers and the communities that we serve”.  The second illuminates the beginning steps being taken to move Diversity, Equity and Inclusion goals forward, including valuable podcast recommendations.

The Unknown Framework of Discovery

How’s the Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Work Going?


Volunteering with Partner Organizations

After several questions from Master Gardeners, we want to reiterate that although some Partner organizations in the metro area have resumed volunteer activities, at this point, in the metro area, Master Gardeners are not approved to participate and volunteer at any partner venues.  

We are deeply appreciative of those partner organizations who are clearly communicating the restrictions of the OSU Master Gardener Program.  We are keeping those organizations apprised of any changes to the University’s in-person volunteer policy and look forward to the day we can resume these valued partnerships.  We will alert all volunteers as restrictions are lifted.


Our September Garden Checklist

It’s time to harvest fruit, plant perennials and vegetables, and renovate the lawn. Find it all in our September Garden Checklist.


Natter’s Notes

Jean R. Natter, OSU Master Gardener

As of early July 2020, there’s a new pest in town, and it goes by the name of Southern Pink Moth, alias Pyrausta inornatalis. The adult moth, found in SE Portland and submitted to the Oregon Department of Agriculture (ODA) was soon declared a new record for Oregon.

Less than two weeks later, a person from Milwaukie submitted an inquiry to Ask an Expert about a small pink moth resting on a salvia leaf in their garden. Its ID was soon verified as a Southern Pink Moth.

Adult Southern Pink Moth, Pyrausta inornatalis
The Southern Pink Moth, Pyrausta inornatalis, wingspan 13mm, was recently identified as a first record for Oregon. Host plants are annual and perennial Salvia species. (Image source:
https://bugguide.net/node/view/1526170/bgimage)

Normal distribution of the Southern Pink Moth is across the southern states, and are most common in the southeast. On the west coast, only four other specimens have been documented, those from Southern California.

Precious little info is available about this small pest. The only official details I was able to locate stated that the adult moth is about a half-inch long, with a wingspread of 13mm.  The forewings are reddish-pink, the hindwings fuscous (brownish gray) and fringed. In the southern states, the adults fly March to November. The larvae bore into salvia flowers and flower buds.

Comments on a garden forum described the larvae is small (about a half-inch), almost translucent, and marked with dark dots. The larvae bore into the base of salvia flowers and flower buds. (As a result, they can be classified as budworms, and will annoy gardeners just as much as do the familiar geranium- and petunia-budworms.) Each pupa is in a filmy cocoon attached to the plant.

Larva of Southern Pink Moth, aka Salvia Budworm, Pyrausta inornatalis on the base of a bud of a Salvia plant
Larva of the Southern Pink Moth, aka Salvia Budworm, Pyrausta inornatalis, is classified as a budworm because it has the nasty habit of boring into the base of Salvia flower buds and flowers. (Image source: https://bugguide.net/node/view/229077/bgimage)

Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) can be used effectively against budworms but timing is critical. One must apply Bt as soon as the first flower buds are damaged. Better yet, apply Bt as the eggs start to hatch such that Bt-coated tissue will be the caterpillars first bite. Unfortunately, Bt degrades quite rapidly when exposed to sunlight, so repeat applications may be needed. Fortunately, Bt targets caterpillars without damaging other insects.

A more direct control method is to check buds for tiny holes and then removing (or squishing) those that are infested.  Other times, the caterpillar will still be on the outside of the bud. Cold winters are believed to kill the pupae, with temperatures of 20F or less able to reduce the next season’s population.

No control guidelines have been issued by ODA or OSU as yet. But since this is a newly introduced species, ODA would be interested in any reports and locations so that they can map the spread of this species. Contact ODA at 503-986-4636.

Resources

The Canadian Entomologist” – https://archive.org/stream/canadianentomolo17ento#page/57/mode/1up

BugGuide: Images of adults, larvae and pupae – https://bugguide.net/node/view/81627

Multiple images at “Butterflies and Moths of North America” – lg larva https://www.butterfliesandmoths.org/species/Pyrausta-inornatalis

Discover Life: Images adults (resting and pinned), also a distribution map – https://www.discoverlife.org/mp/20q?search=Pyrausta+inornatalis&mobile=close&flags=glean:

BugGuide – image of adult https://bugguide.net/node/view/1526170/bgimage

BugGuide – image of larva https://bugguide.net/node/view/229077/bgimage

By Margaret Bayne, OSU Extension Service Staff-retired, OSU Master Gardener

Photo: OSU

Study shows some urban gardens contain too much organic matter. (Kym Pokorny, OSU; via Mykl Nelson & James Cassidy, OSU) https://bit.ly/2PPqF32

Environmental Injury: Winter Burn of Evergreens. (Marianne Ophardt & Rita Hummel, WSU) https://bit.ly/2CkmTLI

Pollen adaptation to ant pollination: a case study from the Proteaceae. “Ant-plant associations are widely diverse and distributed throughout the world, leading to antagonistic and /or mutualistic interactions. “ (Nicola Delnevo, et al: Annals of Botany, Oxford U) https://bit.ly/33Vjfna

Beetles and Wasps vie for title of most diverse critter. (Nell Greenfield Boyce, NPR.org) https://n.pr/3gQwg4Q

Longevity study reveals why ancient trees can stave off death.  “New research “can help us better understand the concept of time in biology.” https://bit.ly/2CkncWS

Thorns to branches. “The pointy defense system relied on by many plants has an interesting origin story. Thorns start out as branch-like structures that grow out of the main stem and then, all of a sudden, turn into sharp death spikes. Now, researchers have not only figured out how that happens, but also how it can be stopped.” (Joram, Plantsandpipettes.com) https://bit.ly/33U0IYn

Strawberries.
Photo: Bernadine Strik, OSU

REVISED PUBLICATION: Growing Strawberries in your Home Garden. (Bernadine Strik, et al; OSU) https://catalog.extension.oregonstate.edu/ec1307

Gall fly outmaneuvers host plant in game of ‘Spy vs. Spy.’ (Sara LaJeunesse, Penn State U) https://bit.ly/2Cle700

What has been thought and taught on the Lunar influence on plants in agriculture?  Perspective from Physics and Biology. (Olga Mayoral, et al; U of Velencia Spain) https://bit.ly/2XUm1oN

Amber specimens reveal vivid color of 99-million-year-old insects. (Iflscience.com) https://bit.ly/3ivzdIo

How the Giant Sequoia protects itself: a three-dimensional network of fibers makes the bark resistant to fire and rock fall. (University of Freiburg) https://bit.ly/3aooDjF

Ants on Peony flowers: an enduring myth.  Do ants harm peonies? (Old Farmers Almanac.com) https://bit.ly/31FbdvC

First Detector summer national webinar series. Improve your diagnostic skills with tips and tricks to help you recognize symptoms of common plant problems. Brush up on identification features of pests on the move like spotted lanternfly, Asian longhorned beetle, and oak wilt. (National Plant Diagnostic Network) https://bit.ly/3h3M58g

Lichen. Photo: OSU

Nature and pollution: what lichens tell us about toxic air. By Beth Askham, Natural History Museum) https://bit.ly/3iDDt8K

Study in Philadelphia links growth in tree canopy to decrease in human mortality. (USDA Forest Service) https://bit.ly/2FcVzjC

Tomato’s hidden mutations in study of 100 varieties (Sciencecodex.com) https://bit.ly/3fTcRii

A Bee C: Scientists translate honeybee queen duets. (Victoria Gill, BBC News) https://bbc.in/3fMvjcw

“The greatest gift of the garden is the restoration of the five senses.”

Hanna Rion

Summer Greetings

We hope you are all healthy and finding bits of time to savor summer garden splendors, whether that is harvesting the first ripe tomato, enjoying bright bursting blossoms, or marveling at pollinators hard at work. What do you enjoy most about summer in a garden?

Although our in-person Master Gardener activities are suspended, we appreciate that we have been able to stay connected via online webinars and our Master Gardener Hangout. We value our metro area Master Gardener community and we look forward to seeing you online in the weeks ahead!


Garden Webinar Series

Our webinar series continues throughout the summer with a variety of horticultural topics, on the following Fridays at 1PM.

July 10 – Therapeutic Horticulture, Gardening for Healthy Living, with Scott Hoffman, Therapeutic Garden Program Coordinator, Whole Health, VA Portland Health Care System.  For details and to register, go to https://beav.es/4F4

July 17 – Community Science and the Mason Bee, with Ron Spendal, metro area, OSU Extension Master Gardener.  For details and to register, go to https://beav.es/4Fo

_________________________________________________________________________

Save the Date!

Save the date for the following August and September webinars, Friday’s at 1PM.  Registration links to come.

East Multnomah Soil and Water Conservation District Rain Garden

August 7 – Invasive Weeds, with the East Multnomah Soil and Water Conservation District

August 14 – Conserving Water around the Landscape, with the East Multnomah Soil and Water Conservation District

August 28 – Introduction to Naturescaping & Native Plants for Wildlife, with the East Multnomah Soil and Water Conservation District

September 11 – Introduction to Rain Gardens/Storm Water Management, with the East Multnomah Soil and Water Conservation District

Webinar Recordings

Do you have a schedule conflict with an upcoming webinar?  Don’t despair.  We are posting recordings of our webinars a few days following the presentation.

Check out past webinars here:
https://media.oregonstate.edu/channel/channelid/161357322


Racial and Social Justice: responding to critical comments

Last month we shared a message from Statewide Master Gardener Program Coordinator, Gail Langellotto, and Master Gardener Outreach Coordinator, LeAnn Locher regarding the OSU Master Gardener Program’s commitment to racial justice. Since then, both our metro area program and the state-wide Master Gardener Program have received overwhelmingly positive feedback and support. It is encouraging and heartening to receive such words of support and to learn of fellow Master Gardeners’ commitment to creating a inclusive Master Gardener community.

If you speak out and stand up for racial and social justice within the Master Gardener Program and are criticized how do you respond? In Gail’s latest blog post she gives guidance on how to respond to criticism. https://beav.es/4FJ


Master Gardener In-person Volunteer Activity Suspension

In the midst of the pandemic, and with OSU Extension Service’s commitment to keeping communities safe, suspension remains in effect for any in-person volunteer activities for OSU Master Gardeners.  This includes all Master Gardener clinics (phone, Farmers Markets, and special events), classes, workshops, demonstration gardens, parks, partner organizations, Speakers Guild presentations, fundraisers, and in-person meetings/lectures/speakers. 

As the State of Oregon lifts restrictions, around the state, OSU Extension is in the process of approving some restricted, limited, volunteer activities.  Approved activities will have requirements regarding safety protocol, which must be met.  As the University provides information and guidance regarding a resumption plan, we will provide updates.


Volunteering with Partner Organizations

Although some Partner organizations in the metro area may be resuming volunteer activities, at this point, in the metro area, Master Gardeners are not approved to participate and volunteer at any partner venues.  

We are deeply appreciative of those partner organizations who are clearly communicating the restrictions of the OSU Master Gardener Program.  We are keeping those organizations apprised of any changes to the University’s in-person volunteer policy and look forward to the day we can resume these valued partnerships.  We will alert all volunteers as restrictions are lifted.

OSU Master Gardener icon

With the cancellation of volunteer activities, and knowing the many challenges people are facing, we are waiving volunteer requirements for 2020.  We ask metro area Master Gardeners to report any volunteer hours served this year and their continuing education hours, by September 30, 2020.

We encourage Master Gardeners to take advantage of the many online continuing education opportunities.  Updates will be sent via email and/or posted in this monthly newsletter.


Master Gardener Hangout

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Are you looking to connect with other Master Gardeners in an informal, online setting?  Join our Friday, Master Gardener Hangouts.  This is a forum to talk all things gardening. 

Past Master Gardener Hangouts have been fun.  Our guest speakers have joined-in to answer additional questions. MGs have swapped tips and tricks for growing vegetables, dealing with weeds, or trellising plants. 

You can connect via phone or internet. Look for an email from Marcia McIntyre, which will be sent on Friday afternoons as that week’s webinar is ending, with a link to join the ‘Master Gardener Hangout’.


Online Educational Opportunities

A wide-variety of educational webinars are available to view from other Master Gardener and Extension programs across the state, plus from our partners at Metro. Check them out.

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Master Gardener Advanced Training webinars continue on July 16, 10am with Solve Pest Problems: A New Resource for Master Gardeners and the Public. Join Weston Miller, and learn about the exciting developments for the Solve Pest Problems website.
Pre-register here: https://learn.extension.org/events/3762


Gardening Will Save the World webinar series, sponsored by the Hood River Co. Master Gardeners. July 15, Pesticide Safety, presented by Brooke Edmunds, Community Horticulture, Master Gardeners Linn and Benton Counties To register, go to https://beav.es/4rt


Tree School Online
OSU Extension Clackamas Co. Tree School continues to offer weekly online webinars through July 28. Look for classes designated for Master Gardener continuing education credit. For more information go to https://beav.es/4Hn


Fall Gardening

Join a Metro Natural Gardening Educator for a webinar on growing fall vegetables and landscaping tasks and tips for the coming fall season. Wednesday, July 29, 3PM to 4:30PM. Learn helpful tips for growing in containers, planning for fall and winter harvests, starting seeds, fertilizing and more!

Be wildlife-conscious with your fall gardening by protecting over-wintering habitat! Plan for fall planting of native trees, shrubs and perennials for enduring garden interest. Maintain a healthy lawn you can enjoy without the use of toxic chemicals. Click here to register.

A subsequent webinar on the same topic in Spanish will be offered upon request.


Our July and August Garden Checklist

Tips on summer watering, dealing with pesky wasps, plus apple care in our July and August Garden Checklist videos.

Natter’s Notes

Jean R. Natter, OSU Master Gardener

Once again, herbicide damage rears its ugliness in home vegetable gardens. A recent new release from the Oregon Department of Agriculture (ODA) reported that clopyralid has been detected in composted manure (referred to as herbicide carryover) from McFarland’s and Deans Innovations. (See news report: https://www.einpresswire.com/article/519298724/oda-discovers-contaminated-soil-and-compost-after-receiving-complaints)

Then, too, it’s important for gardeners to avoid inadvertent drift from glyphosate (in RoundUp products) and 2,4-D (a broad-leaf herbicide).  

Potato plant with leaves showing yellowing from herbicide drift damage.
Fig 1 – Glyphosate drift during the growing season. Glyphosate damage to plants (here, potato) during the growing season affects the newest cells first, this because glyphosate moves with the sugars. Look for yellowing of the new tip growth and at the base of expanding leaves. Glyphosate is the active ingredient in RoundUp and certain other herbicides. (Client image; 2020-06)  2020-06 client https://ask.extension.org/expert/questions/646290

Herbicide carryover is sneaky, a wolf in sheep’s clothing. Some gardeners who add composted manure to their soil will be rudely surprised when they see their damaged vegetables. Here’s the deal: Several active ingredients in commercial products (clopyralid and aminopyralid) persist for a year if not actively composted during that time. It’s currently illegal to use such products in home gardens and landscapes. Their main use is agricultural, on grains and pastures. The rude encounter that may confront gardeners most often occurs from free manures shared by farmers who are unaware of what their pest companies applied to their pastures and grain fields.  The herbicide on the grains passes through the gut and exits intact even while the livestock are unaffected. Thus, no one suspects mayhem is possible. (Images-

The most sensitive plants

Of all the plants you might grow, tomatoes and grapes are super-sensitive to just a whiff of errant herbicide. Then, too people want to know if they can safely eat the produce. Well, it’s like this: That’s not something the producer tests for; most likely they’ll suggest you discard it.

Rules to garden by

Inadvertent herbicide damage from any cause may be fatal or temporary. Drift during application is another possibility both during fall clean-up and/or weed-killing forays during the growing season.

A.) The best guideline for managing weeds: Kill ‘em while they’re young. Make it your rule to pull it when you see it. In other words, don’t tell yourself you’ll get it later. (Don’t bother asking why I say that.)

B.) Remove it before it blooms. (Seeds are the next developmental stage!)

C.) Don’t contribute to the abundant Soil Seed Bank. If buds or flowers are present, don’t throw it down with the thought “I’ll pick it up later.”

Test composted manure before you apply it

Do a simple bioassay (in several pots) before the compost is added to the garden. Or, if you’ve already added it, do the bioassay in the garden plot before you plant.  (Easy instructions are at  http://whatcom.wsu.edu/ag/aminopyralid/bioassay.html

Responsible use of herbicides avoids off-target damage

Forsythia plant showing narrow, stringy growth which is an indication of herbicide damage.
Fig 2 – Glyphosate, applied during the prior fall, usually as a clean-up spray. Sub-lethal doses of glyphosate are easily delivered to off-target plants via a light breeze and/or spray turbulence. Look for clusters of narrow (stringy) growth, such as here on forsythia, sometimes called witches’ brooms, at the nodes during the spring growth surge. On roses, differentiate from similar-appearing rose rosette. (Client image; 2020-06) // https://ask.extension.org/expert/questions/651373

Responsible use of herbicides will avoid inadvertent damage to off-target plants.

1.) Follow all label directions, among them guidelines for personal protection.

2.) Never spray any pesticide(such as an herbicide or insecticide) if the temperature is, or will exceed, 80F that day.

3.) If you use herbicides, dedicate a sprayer for that purpose, marking it boldly to avoid accidents. In spite of a thorough cleaning of the sprayer and wand, a minute herbicide residue will damage ultra-sensitive plants, among them your tomatoes.

The Bottom Line: Be an aware gardener!

Resources

– “Gardeners often unaware of exposing tomatoes to herbicide” (http://www.caes.uga.edu/newswire/story.html?storyid=4451)

– Images of Herbicide carryover – http://whatcom.wsu.edu/ag/aminopyralid/images.html

– “Landscape Plant Problems,” (MISC0194; WSU) A book in all metro MG Offices. See the section titled “Common Herbicide Damage.”