Though geography is supposed to be a holistic approach to studying the world’s environmental and social characteristics, geography curriculum in the U.S. has long told only select stories. Complicit with military expansion and colonization, silent on racism and sexism, and dominated by white, Anglo-American histories, geography’s exclusions must be contended with. In response to these realities, calls to transform geography curriculum are proliferating (Daigle and Sundberg 2017; Domosh 2015; Esson 2018; Esson and Last 2019; Hamilton 2020; Jazeel 2017).

This site gathers resources with the aim of supporting the transformation of geography curriculum. The materials gathered here can be used across the breadth of geography to teach students how geography intersects with gender exclusion, structural racism, environmental and climate (in)justice, and activism and social change.

Sources:

Daigle, M., & Sundberg, J. 2017. From where we stand: Unsettling geographical knowledges in the classroom. Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers 42(3): 338-341.

Domosh, M. 2015. Why is our geography curriculum so white? Association of American Geographers Newsletter, 1.

Esson, J. 2018. “The why and the white:” Racism and curriculum reform in British geography. Area 0(0): 1-8.

Esson, J., & Last, A. 2019. Learning and teaching about race and racism in geography. In Handbook for Teaching and Learning in Geography (eds. H. Walkington, J. Hill and S. Dyer). Edward Elgar Publishing.

Hamilton, A.R. 2020. The white unseen: On white supremacy and dangerous entanglements in geography. Dialogues in Human Geography 10(3): 299-303.

Jazeel, T. 2017. Mainstreaming geography’s decolonial imperative. Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers 42(3): 334-337.

This site was developed through collaborative efforts and reflects the work done by all those listed here:

Wauren Richardson

Wauren is a senior geography major at Oregon State University. Her research interests include geography education, cultural geography, and geographies of race. After graduating, she plans to pursue her MA in Geography.

Kelsey Emard

Kelsey is an Instructor and Assistant Professor (Sr Res) of Geography at Oregon State University. She works in the fields of political ecology and environmental justice (see more).

TBD

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