Dr. Thomas (Thom) Field – Counseling Program Chair and Associate Professor
Thomas Field, PhD, is an Associate Professor in the College of Education at Oregon State University. He has taught graduate counseling students since 2011 and previously worked as a faculty member at Boston University School of Medicine. His research focuses on the integration of neuroscience into counseling practice, and professional and social justice advocacy. During his academic career, he has published more than 30 peer-reviewed articles. He has also authored two books on the topic of neuroscience integration. He has received grant funding from agencies that include the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMSHA). His research and teaching has been recognized nationally. In 2019, he received the Counselor Educator of the Year award from the American Mental Health Counselors Association. He is also a current standards revision committee member of the Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP), the recognized specialized accreditation body for counseling. In addition to faculty responsibilities, he has actively helped clients with mental health concerns since 2006. He has provided counseling to more than 1,000 clients during his career and currently maintains a small private practice where he sees adolescents and adults. He is board certified as a counselor and clinical supervisor by the National Board of Certified Counselors and affiliates.

Dr. Beth Rankin – Professor of Practice | Double Degree Program
Beth Rankin joins us from the University of Kansas, where she completed her Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction in 2021. Her dissertation explores secondary traumatic stress in K-12 educators. She also holds an M.S. in Curriculum and Instruction and a B.S. in Elementary Education from the University of Kansas. Beth brings knowledge and experience in K-12, as she has taught elementary school for five years, from kindergarten through fifth grade in Kansas. She has also served as an instructor at the University of Kansas, and she has specialized knowledge of support for ELLs. She has taught a variety of classes, including Curriculum & the Learner in the Elementary School; Student Teaching Seminar; Differentiating Curriculum & Instruction; Assessing English Language Learners; Reading & English Language Learners; Practicum in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages.

John Scholl – Executive Assistant to the Deans
John grew up in Austin, TX, and moved to Eugene, OR in 2009 where his wife, Julie, is from. They have three young school-aged kiddos and are eager Beavers for the new job and town. John has a BSE in Kinesiology and M. Ed. in Sports Management and has worked in non-profit, public, private, and Higher Ed settings in a variety of different leadership and support roles. His most recent position was with PeaceHealth as a Sr. Quality Facilitator. John’s interests outside of work is lots of family time, ministry-related pursuits, going to any live event, and all kinds of recreational fitness pursuits.

About Dr. Molly Moran

Bio: Hello! My name is Molly Moran, and I am a new Clinical Assistant Professor in the Counseling Department. Before joining the OSU- Cascades faculty, I completed my PhD at Boise State University and spent one year as a Visiting Assistant Professor at The College of Idaho. I am a Licensed School Counselor in Oregon and a Licensed Professional Counselor in Idaho. My teaching and research interests include social justice, advocacy, and cultural humility.


Fun Fact: I am an extreme outdoor enthusiast. When I am not in the mountains I am often daydreaming about my next outdoor adventure. I was a competitive ski racer for 15 years and still love to rip around the mountain as much as I did when I was 17.


Why I’m excited to work at CoEd/OSU: I was drawn to OSU because of its commitment to equity, inclusion, and social justice. I look forward to joining a professional community that is actively working towards creating more equitable experiences for students while also engaging in social justice work on campus and in communities.   

About Dr. Lucy Purgason

Biography: I am excited to join my colleagues in the Counseling program at OSU-Cascades as an Assistant Professor. I have worked in counselor education for eight years, including positions at Western Washington University and Appalachian State. I started my professional journey as a school counselor committed to implementing equity-driven and anti-racist school counseling programs in rural, low-income districts in mental health professional shortage areas. I’m passionate about training counseling students to utilize strengths-based, culturally sustaining approaches with students and clients. 

Fun fact/hobby about me: I love being outside enjoying nature but am often underprepared for many of my adventures. I once ran a 5k mud run barefoot (ouch!). 

Why I’m excited to work at CoEd/OSU: My research is informed by my experiences as a school counselor, working at a school specifically for newcomer immigrant and refugee students. I am deeply invested in contributing to knowledge that assists school counselors in delivering comprehensive school counseling programs inclusive of students’ cultural strengths, drawing on social justice frameworks such as Community Cultural Wealth (Yosso, 2005) and Relational-Cultural Theory. I value opportunities to collaborate with colleagues and students and look forward to partnerships through the OSU-Cascades Counseling Clinic and local schools.   

“Elephants are what counselors should be—empathic and caring”

By: Maia Farris

Gene Eakin
Gene Eakin and an Elephant friend

The College of Education’s Counseling Program Coordinator, Gene Eakin, shares an impactful story about a veterinarian whose death was mourned for by a group of elephants. The veterinarian cared for the elephants, and when he passed away, the elephant herd was reported to have stood in front of the veterinarian’s house and bowed their heads. Eakin’s favorite animal is an elephant because he believes that “elephants are what counselors should be—empathic and caring”.

This year we are congratulating Gene Eakin who has been awarded the 2017 Leona Tyler award. This annual award was established by the Oregon Counseling Association to recognize individuals whose work has had statewide implications for counseling. Eakin is the 8th person from Oregon State to receive the Leona Tyler award.

(Past winners listed here http://or-counseling.org/Past-Awards )

Eakin has worked hard on both the state and national level to strengthen school counseling and connect people to the current issues that are especially found in K-12 schools. This past June, Eakin and his wife Twila celebrated 50 years as OSU Alumni.  As an alumus and experienced counselor educator, Eakin is passionate about his work in the counseling program. He is proud to share that in the counseling hybrid program (online and in person), 31 out of 35 students were working full time as they started their third year in the program. The hybrid format fulfills Oregon State University’s land grant mission in providing individuals from all areas of Oregon access to becoming a counselor.

Eakin’s counseling work has spanned forty-two years in Oregon working at Lebanon High School, West Salem High School, Lewis and Clark College, and Oregon State University. Being awarded the Leona Tyler award is unique and means a lot to Eakin, because previous award recipients have mainly been a part of the large population of clinical mental health counselors, and he is one of the few to be recognized for his work as a school counselor and school counselor educator.

He hopes that this award will give him a platform to “speak to the mental health needs of our children and adolescents.” Going forward, we need counselors who will advocate for these needs and have the empathic and caring traits of an elephant. There is an increase in the number of elementary school students who need this support; as elementary school counselors across the state report that more and more students’ lives have been affected by family trauma related to the recession and the resulting family poverty.

Award
Leona Tyler Award

Eakin says, “there are a limited number of mental health counselors in most communities providing services to children and adolescents and Oregon, overall, ranks 49th in provision of mental health services to our citizens.” Eakin expressed that “we need more school counselors doing the good work that they do and more school social workers doing the good work they do in order for Oregon schools to increase attendance rates, graduation rates, post high-school education matriculation rates, and improve the behavioral and mental health of our students.” With Oregon’s student-counselor ratio (510-1) ranking 39th, Eakin vows that he will continue to advocate for the school counseling profession and for the work they do in meeting our youth’s career and college readiness, counseling needs, academic counseling needs, and personal-social-emotional counseling needs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

By: Gregg Kleiner

For 12 years, Lindsay Dec worked as a licensed massage therapist. She noticed that many of her
clients would talk during the massage — telling her stories about their lives and describing
challenges they were facing, from fears to family issues.
“People seemed to be looking to me for help or advice,” Dec says.
Because she didn’t feel qualified to do much more than listen, Dec started looking for a new
career that would give her the skills and credentials to help people in a new way — one that
could bridge the mind-body connection. During her search, she stumbled across the Master of
Counseling program at OSU-Cascades.
“When I found that, I just knew,” she says. “I wanted to continue to help others, so this was
perfect.”

The program’s location was also perfect, since Dec was already living in Bend, Oregon, where
she’d moved in 2010. The program’s part-time option allowed her to continue her massage
practice while pursuing a master’s degree.
She credits her parents with influencing her overall career path.
“They always taught us t

o help people, to foster connections with others, and my mom always
emphasized the golden rule,” Dec says.
In 2014, she earned her master’s in clinical mental health counseling and now works as a
counselor at Bend Counseling and Biofeedback Inc.
“The best part of the program was — and still is — the faculty,” Dec says. “They are just
amazing — the adjunct faculty, too. There is great breadth of experience and a range of
strengths. I felt very well-supported, and I’m still in contact with some of the faculty.”
While in the program, Dec completed three different internships — one at the Warm Springs
Indian Reservation, one at a Bend relief nursery for vulnerable children and one at the
counseling office where she now works. She also earned a certificate in Interpersonal
Neurobiology from Portland State University and completed HeartMath Biofeedback training
during her graduate program.
“It was a little insane,” she says of all she did while working on her master’s.
Now that her formal training is complete, Dec still stays busy. She serves on the OSU-Cascades’
Counseling Program Advisory Board and is raising a puppy named PJ to be a certified therapy
dog.

“Therapy dogs are great in nursing homes, and they can help kids who struggle with reading,”
says Dec, who brings PJ to the office with her. “My clients love her and say PJ is
going to make a great therapy dog.”
For Dec, OSU-Cascades was the right location with the right faculty and the right focus. And it’s
clear she loves her new career.

 

Society needs good counselors.

Oregon State has been educating them for 100 years.

By: Gregg Kleiner

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Timeline Graphic By: Maia Farris

Oregon State University has one of the oldest continuously operating counseling
education programs in the U.S. The first course was taught in 1917 — just five years
after Harvard University offered the first counseling course in the nation.
The earliest courses focused on the vocational training movement that prepared people
for a range of key jobs during wartime. That focus remained until the late 1920s when
courses expanded to include emotional and psychological issues.

Today, Oregon State’s counselor education program is one of the largest in the nation,
with 125 master’s and 72 doctoral students taking course work delivered in a
combination of in-class and online formats. These hybrid programs include students
from across Oregon, as well as students coming from as far away as Chicago, New
York and North Carolina. Master’s students meet for two days a term at Chemeketa
Community College in Salem, while doctoral students attend two weekend sessions a
year at Clackamas Community College in Wilsonville. A more traditional master’s
program of mostly in-class courses is offered at OSU-Cascades in Bend.

“Because of our national reach, we have amazingly talented and diverse doctoral
students who will go on to train the next generation of school and mental health
counselors,” says Cass Dykeman, an associate professor of counseling in the College
of Education.

 


Ryan Reese is the head of our counseling program at OSU-Cascades and he recently received the Mental Health Hero Award throughTrillium Health Services. This is a statewide award where the organization honors 31 different “heroes” each day of May (Mental Health Awareness Month). Here is the website where they include information about theawards and the full list of recipients:

https://trilliumfamily.org/…/keep-oregon-well-announces-fu…/

They will include Reese’s information profile at the Trillium homepage on May 25th. https://trilliumfamily.org/

 

The counseling program at OSU has come a long way since the founder, Professor Frank H. Shepherd, taught the first counseling course during the Spring Semester of 1917. This year, Oregon State University’s College of Education’s Counseling program is proud to announce the celebration of its 100th anniversary.

Entering the 100th year of counseling, Cass Dykeman shares, that “the centennial is a chance for all of Oregon to celebrate the pivotal role the citizens of the State have played in the continuous development of this profession, [which is] so vital to the health of the nation.” Cass Dykeman, the Associate Professor in Counselor Education at OSU’s College of Education, has been a part of the program’s development since 1998.

After receiving a Master’s in Educational Psychology with a School Counseling concentration and a Doctorate in Counselor Education, Dykeman pursued his passion in the following years as a counselor educator, and as an elementary school and high school counselor in Washington. Although he loves his current job, he admits that he “miss[es] playing football with the kids at recess. You don’t get recess teaching doctoral students!”

Today, Dykeman continues his work as an Associate Professor in the program. His favorite part of the program is working with doctoral students on their dissertations because, “helping advanced students create new knowledge is a thrill” for him. He enjoys the manuscript style of the dissertations, because many of the doctoral students publish their efforts in peer-reviewed journals. Rebecca Bolante is one of Cass’ prior students who has produced two peer-reviewed journal articles from her dissertation about Threat Assessment. Dykeman has already served as a major professor for 24 PhD graduates, and says, “[his] goal is to hit 50 by the time [he] retire[s].”

Dykeman understands that pursuing a doctorate is an overall large investment; but finds the Counseling program unique because, it has offered “distance hybrid education since 1933” and is ranked third oldest for continuously operating counselor education program in the world. Dykeman adds that, the program is “high quality and [has] a proven track record.”

 

 

Rebecca Bolante By Maia Farris

Rebecca Bolante: Director of Threat AssessmentWhen trying to prevent a tragedy, OSU alumna and Director of Threat Assessment, Rebecca Bolante, says threat assessment is “not about finding someone who would do something bad, it is the opposite — it is about creating a supportive plan so their situation changes.”

Rebecca Bolante is a stellar graduate from the Oregon State University College of Education who was studying in the PhD in Counseling program when the Virginia Tech shooting occurred. This event sparked her interest in threat assessment, and she changed her research focus to answer the question, “How can we prevent something like this happening in Higher Education?”

In 2014, Bolante graduated from Oregon State University with a Ph.D. in Counselor Education and Supervision. Bolante continues her work as the Director of Threat Assessment Management programs at Chemeketa Community College in Salem, Oregon. Along with her Ph.D., her education background includes a Master’s degree in Rehabilitation Counseling and a Bachelor’s in Psychology with a minor in Criminal Justice from Western Oregon University.

Bolante was first introduced to the counseling program here at OSU when one of her professors spoke highly of the program. The flexible, hybrid program including both online and on-campus classes was perfect for her needs. Working full time and as a mother made finishing a degree more challenging, but her passion of caring for others, education, and research propelled her to earn her degree.

With her research on threat assessment, she learned the best tactics to prevent violence and continues to share these techniques with various professionals like counselors, law enforcement, human resources, and legal counsels . “The key to threat assessment”, she says, “is a team approach”. Overall her research created the Threat Management Resources program at Chemeketa. This program focuses on three parts: prevention (threat assessment), what to do during an event, and disaster behavioral health recovery, and can result in a certificate.

Currently, Bolante’s work at CCC is filling the need to provide the support, education, and training in Threat Management for working professionals. The program has even expanded to places outside of the state to provide the training where it is needed. Bolante’s work doesn’t just engage with the national conversation about mental health and safety nationwide, she contributes to it.

At the beginning of her research she thought that all campuses had threat assessment teams, given they are highly recommended by the Secret Service, FBI, and the U.S. Department of Education. In reality, most colleges and communities do not have someone like Bolante to help facilitate the aftermath of traumatizing events; however, she hopes that her workshops on how to set up a response room, to-go box, and other trainings will help see an increase. She believes campuses should all have threat assessment teams because “there is a need and it continues to grow”. Fortunately, here at Oregon State we have our own Threat Assessment Team with Oregon State Police lieutenant, Eric Judah, co-founder of the team, who also assists Bolante with various training.

After learning about the College of Education’s new Master of Counseling in Clinical Mental Health program, Bolante expressed interest in the online aspect. She shared that her last part of her academics was online and although she originally questioned how it would work out, she stated that “the online experience went very well…[because] it is very efficient to handle the details. I can see how it would benefit counselors in training”.

Some improvements that Bolante hopes for the future is more work in counselor education involving threat assessment and disaster behavioral health. Bolante admits that she “made an assumption that counselors have training [in disaster response], and although there is more now, it is a different skill set with emphasis on psychological aid.” She also emphasizes the importance in education about spirituality and belief systems because they play a significant part of responding to disasters since “people’s belief systems oftentimes get confused and unsure during these times”.

One thing she loves about her job is seeing people “get off the pathway to violence and receiving positive support”. Bolante shares that “if we could learn more about the warning signs and report them prior to an incident we could reduce mass violence.” With work keeping her busy and oftentimes dealing with dark topics, she knows how important self care is and enjoys gardening, music and family time.

Bolante is fortunate to have her hard work and determination supported by her family, husband, and children. Another person who is a continuing supporter of Bolante’s education and work is Dr. Cass Dykeman, a faculty member in OSU’s Counselor Education program. Bolante says that he has “been a champion for these initiatives” and together, they have created recent publications; including one this year.

Logo of Association for Counselor Education and Supervision

ACESOregon State University will be well represented at the Association for Counselor Educators and Supervisors (ACES) National Conference in Denver, Colorado from October 16-20, 2013, with approximately forty students, alumni, and faculty members presenting during the conference.

The goal of ACES is to improve the education, credentialing and supervision of counselors working in all settings of society.  The association also strives to encourage publications on current issues, relevant research, proven practices, ethical standards and conversations on related problems.  Counselors often find leadership opportunities through ACES.

Please see the following list of Facebook links to the names of College of Education associates presenting and their topics:

Students:

Bohrer, DeJesus, Hambrick, Hixson, and Millmore

http://aces2013.sched.org/event/c813ab239bd3c51ba0eccefec1d3718e#

Causey

http://aces2013.sched.org/event/4f499e95e8b16d29ef2c657feb04b1f7

Clark

http://aces2013.sched.org/event/3f4aeff15138ad163493889a0b5fb4e5

DeJesus and Nelson

http://aces2013.sched.org/event/bfbae24feb052a76c888b74179681155

Franklin

http://aces2013.sched.org/event/debf37fd18f7d364b2254f98f63415f3#

Pendygraft 

http://aces2013.sched.org/event/a04c483d75e14f0c0c850ff7d9be5156#

 

Alumni:

Aasheim and Melton

http://aces2013.sched.org/event/a45bb22f95c83c533906d98622a44cce#

http://aces2013.sched.org/event/a45bb22f95c83c533906d98622a44cce

Cook and McGlasson

http://aces2013.sched.org/event/5f722f2089481f4cce33808779f754e7#

http://aces2013.sched.org/event/7b39da48f4c0d34a079a2cc9bd818436#

http://aces2013.sched.org/event/baa14f3a5e65e46391b5d167e4a9c63b

Dempsey and Ratts

http://aces2013.sched.org/event/f21fe4f93db92cb0ffc154222537ed91

Dekruyf

http://aces2013.sched.org/event/4eda64c69dd38dea706c92e596281ab3

Donaldson

http://aces2013.sched.org/event/cbdd11b627383f0ac1fb41621b263f7f

Glover

http://aces2013.sched.org/event/ad6dac249b5a9630c172189e170efc19#

Graham

http://aces2013.sched.org/event/82d62d4902e2f32b9387331e604fb813

http://aces2013.sched.org/event/8805a81b9d80b954b4331883a435de7e

Jorgensen and Murphy

http://aces2013.sched.org/event/603b164d5118d2f65431dc0db09897d0

Pepperell

http://aces2013.sched.org/event/75c9433ddb437da1acfd89109810ff61

http://aces2013.sched.org/event/9207b5a5ad7286985575f69f7565f3e2

Shea

http://aces2013.sched.org/event/a45b6b64927ffd7587739c1d06de2b3f

Smith

http://aces2013.sched.org/event/07def8e502688a3d208830aa62a5ca64

 

Stauffer

http://aces2013.sched.org/event/603b164d5118d2f65431dc0db09897d0

http://aces2013.sched.org/event/4e5258424c1f0df947aee9f51abd2912

 

Faculty:

Biles, Donaldson, Ford, Kelley, Reese, and Stroud

http://aces2013.sched.org/event/cbdd11b627383f0ac1fb41621b263f7f#

Eakin

http://aces2013.sched.org/event/8659491c5f067b56bfa931732f62a1ea

Ng

http://aces2013.sched.org/event/6032685b7f8e1631b61be856141c5bb3

http://aces2013.sched.org/event/e97b5a1d66de9d1c2d73e554bd8ed61d

Rubel

http://aces2013.sched.org/event/2d95fea6aae7f8f9bb98a7193e45da18

http://aces2013.sched.org/event/3f4aeff15138ad163493889a0b5fb4e5

http://aces2013.sched.org/event/bfbae24feb052a76c888b74179681155

Reese

http://aces2013.sched.org/event/de6bc45fd665d96aeb9226f64e6c1c85#.UlXEg2RgY4Y

http://aces2013.sched.org/event/9d7771ca269f9bd35411048442720813#.UlXEomRgY4Y

Stroud

http://aces2013.sched.org/event/a04c483d75e14f0c0c850ff7d9be5156#