Graduating College of Education students,

Save the date for this year’s 2021 Commencement which will take place on Saturday, June 12 for Corvallis and Ecampus students. The virtual events will begin with the university’s main commencement celebration from 10:30-11:30 a.m. PDT, followed by pre-recorded school and college ceremonies. The OSU Cascades commencement will take place on June 13 at 9:00 a.m. PDT.

Although virtual, we commit to enable engaging, student-driven Commencement events with personal touches that allow you to be featured if you choose to participate this way. Visit commencement.oregonstate.edu for more information.

> Celebrate with the College of Education with #OSUCoEdGrad and win!

Let’s celebrate together. When you post your grad photos on Instagram, Facebook, or Twitter, use the hashtag #OSUCoEdGrad and tag @osucoed.

Those who tag us and use the #OSUCoEdGrad will be entered into a SWAG giveaway. The 3 random winners will be contacted and mailed College of Ed SWAG items

> Submit a video by May 15th and win a prize!

Represent the college and be highlighted in the college’s virtual commencement video. The University is looking for students to submit a very short video clip (film horizontally) and answering one of the questions below in a complete sentence. Submit videos to maia.farris@oregonstate.edu by May 15th and be entered to win a SWAG giveaway. If you have questions, please email maia.farris@oregonstate.edu

  • Why are you excited to be a teacher, counselor, leader in education, and/or change agent?
  • What album, book, or movie has shaped who you are as a person?
  • How have you surprised yourself while in college?
  • What goal have you achieved that felt really far away your first year in college?
  • What was the best class you took in college, and why?
  • What’s something that you loved doing as a kid that you still love doing as an adult?
  • Best place to study on campus?
  • Make up your own question/answer

> #BeaverGrad checklist:

Congratulations on this big achievement, class of 2021 Beavers. You’re the next generation of teachers, counselors, researchers and leaders in education.

Join the quarterly Alumni Newsletter and follow us on social media to stay in the loop about upcoming community events, professional development, and more. Please keep in touch and let us know where you are and what you’re doing. We’d love to feature you in an upcoming newsletter!

Website | CoEd BlogTwitter | Facebook | Instagram 

Sincerely,
Susan K. Gardner
College of Education, Dean

The National Science Foundation (NSF) awarded a $2,779,198, five-year grant to Portland State University and the Teachers Development Group (TDG) for a study that aims to improve math teaching and learning.

The project — titled Co-Learning Math Teaching Project: Collaborative Structures to Support Learning to Teach Across the Professional Teaching Continuum — will got underway in November. Experts from West Linn-based nonprofit TDG will lead a research team from five universities: PSU, Oregon State University-Cascades, Montana State University, University of Washington and University of Maryland-College Park. TDG seeks to improve students’ math achievement and understanding through math educators’ professional development. 

This project focuses on the clinical preparation for teacher candidates and professional development for experienced math educators. The project will implement collaborative learning structures that seek to enhance teacher candidate’s learning and collaboration with cooperating teachers (mentors working in the field) to improve outcomes for middle and high school students. Through observation, interviews and other forms of data collection and analysis, the research project aims to create a model that supports mentors and teacher candidates to “co-learn” ambitious mathematics teaching through focusing on justification and generalization. Additionally, the Co-Learning Math Teaching Project will focus on how educators learn to teach more equitably, gaining greater knowledge of the structural oppression and systemic racism that many of their students face.

Senior Instructor, Melinda Knapp, is the OSU-Cascades partner listed in the description.

Recently, Oregon State University held the 39th Annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration.

At this event, President Alexander announced the creation of the President’s Commission on the Status of Black Faculty and Staff Affairs to be co-chaired by Terrance Harris, the director of the Lonnie B. Harris Black Cultural Center, and our very own, Dr. Tenisha Tevis, an Assistant Professor in Adult and Higher Education at the College of Education.

Dr. Tevis is also the 2021 recipient of the Frances Dancy Hooks Award which recognizes Oregon State students, staff or faculty who exemplify Frances Dancy Hooks’ work: building bridges across cultures, showing courage in promoting diversity, and proudly “Walking the Talk.”

Society needs good counselors.

Oregon State has been educating them for 100 years.

By: Gregg Kleiner

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Timeline Graphic By: Maia Farris

Oregon State University has one of the oldest continuously operating counseling
education programs in the U.S. The first course was taught in 1917 — just five years
after Harvard University offered the first counseling course in the nation.
The earliest courses focused on the vocational training movement that prepared people
for a range of key jobs during wartime. That focus remained until the late 1920s when
courses expanded to include emotional and psychological issues.

Today, Oregon State’s counselor education program is one of the largest in the nation,
with 125 master’s and 72 doctoral students taking course work delivered in a
combination of in-class and online formats. These hybrid programs include students
from across Oregon, as well as students coming from as far away as Chicago, New
York and North Carolina. Master’s students meet for two days a term at Chemeketa
Community College in Salem, while doctoral students attend two weekend sessions a
year at Clackamas Community College in Wilsonville. A more traditional master’s
program of mostly in-class courses is offered at OSU-Cascades in Bend.

“Because of our national reach, we have amazingly talented and diverse doctoral
students who will go on to train the next generation of school and mental health
counselors,” says Cass Dykeman, an associate professor of counseling in the College
of Education.

 


Ryan Reese is the head of our counseling program at OSU-Cascades and he recently received the Mental Health Hero Award throughTrillium Health Services. This is a statewide award where the organization honors 31 different “heroes” each day of May (Mental Health Awareness Month). Here is the website where they include information about theawards and the full list of recipients:

https://trilliumfamily.org/…/keep-oregon-well-announces-fu…/

They will include Reese’s information profile at the Trillium homepage on May 25th. https://trilliumfamily.org/

 

Preparing College Students for Life and Work

Dr. Matthew Hora: Beyond the Skills Gap

FREE EVENT: Thursday, May 11, 2017 5:00 PM – 6:30 PM; Furman Hall Rm 404

Beyond the Skills Gap challenges the concept of a “skills gap,” highlighting instead the value of broader twenty-first-century skills in postsecondary education. Matthew T. Hora and his colleagues advocate for a system in which employers share responsibility along with the education sector to serve the collective needs of the economy, society, and students. Drawing on interviews with educators in two- and four-year institutions and employers in the manufacturing and biotechnology sectors, the authors demonstrate the critical importance of habits of mind such as problem solving, teamwork, and communication. They go on to show how faculty and program administrators can create active learning experiences that develop students’ skills across a range of domains. The book includes in-depth descriptions of eight educators whose classrooms exemplify the effort to blend technical learning with the cultivation of twenty-first-century habits of mind.

Matthew Hora is an assistant professor of adult and higher education in the Department of Liberal Arts and Applied Studies at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, and a research scientist at the Wisconsin Center for Education Research.

More Event Info: http://calendar.oregonstate.edu/event/122357/