Graphic featuring photo of Amanda Kibler alongside text and the College of Education Logo.

Amanda Kibler is a Professor and Program Chair at the College of Education, whose work was recently published in the NYS TESOL (New York State Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages) Journal. To read her open access article for free, titled Teacher Collaboration To Support Multilingual Students Designated As English Learners: Ecological Perspectives and Critical Questions, follow the link here.

Across Oregon, many school districts find themselves in short supply of qualified dual language teachers. With almost 20% of students being current or prior English learners, there is a new level of importance being placed on providing opportunities for educators to earn a dual language specialization.

In 2018, a 5 year, $2.5 million grant funded through the Office of English Language Acquisition National Professional Development from the U.S. Department of Education provided funding for over 80 in-service and pre-service teachers to earn their English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) endorsement or Dual Language (DL) specialization. 

The success of the program led to a new iteration of the grant, known as TEAMS 2.0. The new round of the program will support 100 teachers to earn their ESOL Endorsement and/or DL Specialization, expand the pool of new dual language teachers in partnered districts, and provide DL-focused professional learning opportunities for their current DL educators.

The award for TEAMS 2.0 is approximately $2.7 million and will run through 2026. Along with ESOL and DL specialization for teachers, the grant will support faculty and doctorate students in conducting related research. 

The program courses are all offered through OSU Ecampus, allowing TEAMS 2.0 recipients to complete the coursework remotely and in tandem with their teaching. The courses focus on professional development for licensed educators teaching English learners (EL) and bilingual students.

TEAMS 2.0 expands

This year, three new school district partners will be included in TEAMS 2.0: Portland Public Schools, Woodburn School District, and Hood River School District. The returning partner districts are Beaverton School District, Bend-La Pine School District, Corvallis School District, Greater Albany School District, and Springfield School District. 

“By expanding our work to more districts, we will increase the ripple effects that TEAMS has across the state,” said TEAMS Program Coordinator Nelly Patiño-Cabrera and Principal Investigator Karen Thompson. “This work also builds on successful efforts during TEAMS 1.0 to deepen family and community engagement in partner districts.”

Along with new district partners, a priority of TEAMS 2.0 is a focus on literacy among EL students and multilingual families. As part of TEAMS 1.0, each district group partnered with a local organization to co-design and co-implement activities for multilingual families, said the TEAMS 2.0 coordinators.

“During the COVID-19 pandemic, TEAMS 1.0 participants in Corvallis collaborated with the Corvallis Public Library to design, assemble, and distribute literacy activity bags to 200 families, including bilingual books, writing materials, and instructions for literacy-focused activities caregivers and children could complete together.”

TEAMS 2.0 aims to build on the work of TEAMS 1.0, prioritizing meaningful collaboration between more than just the teachers and EL students, but their families and communities.

Why TEAMS 2.0?

Over the past six years, OSU has recruited 126 in-service teachers in four cohorts, far exceeding its goal of 80 teachers. As of November 2021, 107 teachers have completed coursework with 97 earning an ESOL endorsement and/or DL specialization.

“We met and exceeded our goal of supporting 80 teachers, and found that 95% of participants agreed or strongly agreed that TEAMS 1.0 was effective in preparing them to serve EL students, and increasing their knowledge and skills related to parent, family, and community engagement,” said TEAMS 2.0 Coordinators.

Prior to entering the program, 25% of participants reported being confident or very confident in using ESOL instructional practices in the classroom; this increased to 92% after completing TEAMS.

Tiffany Day, a first grade teacher at William Walker Elementary in Beaverton, Oregon, was a recipient of the TEAMS 1.0 grant and found that the strategies she learned through the program have helped her better meet the needs of her students.

“I feel very fortunate to have been able to participate in the grant program. The knowledge gained was much more beneficial and practical after having taught at a school with a high Emergent Bilingual population and with 10 years of experience using the co-teaching model,” Day said. 

Many other TEAMS 1.0 students found that the program helped them better understand issues of equity and social justice and empower them to play a proactive role in their schools. 

“Participants said they had built stronger relationships and collaboration with both EL specialists and other classroom teachers, and that the program had a major impact on their ability and motivation to engage with multilingual students’ families and communities,”  said TEAMS 2.0 Coordinators. “They had become more adept at building relationships because of their deeper understanding of family and community needs.”

TEAMS 2.0 Coordinators Patiño-Cabrera and Thompson anticipate that the project will have ripple effects on other teachers in schools, through developing design structures in partnering districts, providing stipends for teachers to lead future professional development activities, and a continuation of the College of Education’s partnerships throughout the state. 

“Beyond impacts on individuals, TEAMS 2.0 will have important long-term impacts on the College of Education. We are sustaining and establishing new partnerships with school districts around the state and strengthening collaboration with OSU faculty on research projects.”

Michelle Maller (right) and Misty de Lei (left) will join OSU Counseling as Program Coordinator and Head Advisor.

OSU Counseling is thrilled to announce and introduce our new Counseling Program Coordinator and Counseling Head Advisor!  Michelle Maller and Misty de Lei will start their respective roles as Program Coordinator and Head Advisor starting March 1. Both have extensive experience in supporting students and programs at Oregon State University in prior roles.

Michelle Maller (she/her/hers), Counseling Program Coordinator, holds a bachelor’s degree in Liberal Studies from OSU and a master’s of science degree in Academic Advising from Kansas State University. Michelle has worked at OSU in the College of Forestry since 2013, first as undergraduate program coordinator and later as internship and education coordinator. She has organized and led DEI workshops, played a major role in accreditation efforts, coordinated curriculum revision proposals, and served as PI on Federal grants. She is currently Senator Elect of the OSU Faculty Senate. Michelle is a fourth generation Beaver, graduating with her undergraduate degree from OSU. She is also currently completing her PhD at Kansas State University. Her future goals are to be a continual advocate for students and for the program. 

Misty de Lei (she/her/hers), Counseling Head Advisor, received both her BS in Psychology and a Masters of Education in Counseling at Washington State University. She has worked in various higher education institutions providing counseling and advising services since 2012. She has spent the last six and a half years at OSU working as an academic advisor and student employee supervisor for the College of Business (COB). Misty is actively involved with the OSU community, serving as a faculty advisor for clubs, a member of several advising committees, and a volunteer for cultural diversity events. Outside of OSU, Misty enjoys playing video games, participating in Corvallis sports leagues (soccer, ultimate Frisbee, & softball), and spending time with her family.  

Please join in extending welcome and congratulations to our two new fabulous staff in Counseling!

OSU Counseling was honored to receive the 2022 Counseling Program award from the Society for Sexual, Affectional, Intersex, and Gender Expansive Identities (SAIGE), a division of the American Counseling Association (ACA). This prestigious and competitive award is presented to a counseling program that has demonstrated a commitment to the promotion of LGBTGEQIAP+ awareness and affirmation. The award will be presented to OSU counseling faculty at the national conference of the American Counseling Association this April.

Our program seeks to decrease barriers to entering and completing graduate school for students who identify as LGBTGEQIAP+, and to prepare counselors to counsel and advocate for clients who identify as LGBTGEQIAP+. As an example of this, in 2021 OSU counseling faculty assisted school counselors to implement Gender Identity Support plans to advocate for students who identify as gender expansive. What began as a program piloted at one elementary school quickly spread and is now used by school counselors in the second-largest school district in Oregon. 

January 31, 2022

CORVALLIS, OR—  Oregon State University’s College of Education invites community members to attend the Pecha Kucha event held on Thursday, February 10, 2022, from 6:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. in the Memorial Union Horizon Room. College of Education faculty and students will present their research and innovations in the classroom, in the traditional Pecha Kucha format. 

A Pecha Kucha is a fun and dynamic way to present an idea or a topic. Japanese for “chit chat,” Pecha Kucha started in Japan in 2003 and has now spread across the globe. It consists of 20 slides with each slide shown for 20 seconds only. Set on an automatic timer, each presentation lasts exactly 6 minutes and 40 seconds.

The event will feature Cory Buxton, presenting Language, Culture and Knowledge-Building Through Science; Kathryn McIntosh, presenting Critical Race Feminism, Social Justice, and Mindfulness; Tenisha Tevis, presenting How I Affect Space; Ryan Reece, presenting I Wonder, What is Nature?; Melinda Knapp, presenting Opportunities and Challenges in Learning to Teach Mathematics; Shawn Rowe, presenting There and Back Again: Lessons from O Olhar do Visitante; Unique Page, presenting Is Our Language Color Coded? The Origin Story of my Dissertation; Cass Dykeman, presenting Moving Toward the End: Examining Suicide Through the Lens of Natural Language Processing; and Amanda Kibler, presenting Who is in the Room Matters: Reflections on Multilingual Language Development Inside and Outside the Classroom. 

The event will be in-person and available virtually over Zoom. Registration is required for both in-person and virtual attendees. Individuals attending the event in person will be required to show proof of vaccination and adhere to Oregon State University’s COVID guidelines. Food and drink will be provided for attendees as well. 
For more information and to register for the event, visit https://beav.es/w3v. For questions related to the event, please contact John Scholl at dean_coed@oregonstate.edu.

Following an article published in the Corvallis Gazette-Times, covering the recent changes made by Corvallis School District to mathematics instruction in K-7 schools, Dr. Rebekah Elliott argues in her letter to the editor that peer-reviewed research supports the de-tracking of mathematics.

Dr. Elliott reports that this body of work provides evidence that detracked systems can support all learners and tracked systems negatively impact learners’ mathematical long term success because the system emphasizes acceleration over deep learning of concepts. Acceleration means that students often don’t engage in problem-solving of ill-structured problems that are seen as essential for STEM degrees and cultivating productive mathematical reasoning. Tracked educational systems create courses where students in “low track” courses repeat content year after year without evidence that these opportunities lead to academic success. Many of these students become adults who have developed math anxiety and are community members who exclaim that they are not a “math-person!” What that means for Oregon is economic loss, some estimate in the billions of dollars, lack of mathematical literacy essential for workforce development, and community members who don’t have access to quantitative reasoning to make sense of the complex problems facing us today. Dr. Elliott’s research investigates mathematics leadership development to reduce racial and educational injustice and to advance ambitious and anti-bias mathematics instruction. Read Elliott’s published letter below.

“More than 25 years of peer-reviewed research supports Corvallis School District’s mathematics instruction efforts.

Research documents the pedagogical practices needed to build a detracked educational system and support each and every student to be challenged mathematically. Tracking’s negative impact on learners’ long-term mathematical understanding and enrollment in advanced mathematics courses has long been documented.

Employing the pedagogical skills well supported by research, detracked classrooms do not reduce the opportunity for in-depth learning of mathematics; in fact, they increase it and attend to the disproportionate effects of tracking on students of color, including girls of color. This is why every professional mathematical and statistical organization supports detracking K-12 mathematics.

In a 2015 report, a third to half of Oregon’s students entering college were enrolled in a developmental math course (middle or high school mathematics content). We need a mathematics education system where every student can solve complex real-world problems in a data-rich world. We know the pedagogical strategies needed to support thriving in mathematics and creating opportunities for supported learning in a detracked system.

Corvallis administrators must provide the professional development, time, and ongoing support essential for every teacher to take up the pedagogical practices needed so that every student may engage in challenging and exciting mathematics. I am confident that the Corvallis middle school teachers have the skill and knowledge to do so! Do we as a community have the will to hold up a mirror and address the systemic racism that permeates our educational system?

Rebekah Elliott

Corvallis

Looking for contract work as a Web Designer/Developer?

OSU College of Education is seeking proposals for the redesign and redevelopment of the College of Education’s (CoEd) online web presence. We seek a Web Designer/Developer who is familiar with Drupal 7 and/or is familiar with web development and implementation for marketing purposes. The project is estimated to take up to 12 months in duration. To apply, please view the form and proposal request below. Submit materials to maia.farris@oregonstate.edu by September 30, 2021.

Graduating College of Education students,

Save the date for this year’s 2021 Commencement which will take place on Saturday, June 12 for Corvallis and Ecampus students. The virtual events will begin with the university’s main commencement celebration from 10:30-11:30 a.m. PDT, followed by pre-recorded school and college ceremonies. The OSU Cascades commencement will take place on June 13 at 9:00 a.m. PDT.

Although virtual, we commit to enable engaging, student-driven Commencement events with personal touches that allow you to be featured if you choose to participate this way. Visit commencement.oregonstate.edu for more information.

> Celebrate with the College of Education with #OSUCoEdGrad and win!

Let’s celebrate together. When you post your grad photos on Instagram, Facebook, or Twitter, use the hashtag #OSUCoEdGrad and tag @osucoed.

Those who tag us and use the #OSUCoEdGrad will be entered into a SWAG giveaway. The 3 random winners will be contacted and mailed College of Ed SWAG items

> Submit a video by May 15th and win a prize!

Represent the college and be highlighted in the college’s virtual commencement video. The University is looking for students to submit a very short video clip (film horizontally) and answering one of the questions below in a complete sentence. Submit videos to maia.farris@oregonstate.edu by May 15th and be entered to win a SWAG giveaway. If you have questions, please email maia.farris@oregonstate.edu

  • Why are you excited to be a teacher, counselor, leader in education, and/or change agent?
  • What album, book, or movie has shaped who you are as a person?
  • How have you surprised yourself while in college?
  • What goal have you achieved that felt really far away your first year in college?
  • What was the best class you took in college, and why?
  • What’s something that you loved doing as a kid that you still love doing as an adult?
  • Best place to study on campus?
  • Make up your own question/answer

> #BeaverGrad checklist:

Congratulations on this big achievement, class of 2021 Beavers. You’re the next generation of teachers, counselors, researchers and leaders in education.

Join the quarterly Alumni Newsletter and follow us on social media to stay in the loop about upcoming community events, professional development, and more. Please keep in touch and let us know where you are and what you’re doing. We’d love to feature you in an upcoming newsletter!

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Sincerely,
Susan K. Gardner
College of Education, Dean