Looking for contract work as a Web Designer/Developer?

OSU College of Education is seeking proposals for the redesign and redevelopment of the College of Education’s (CoEd) online web presence. We seek a Web Designer/Developer who is familiar with Drupal 7 and/or is familiar with web development and implementation for marketing purposes. The project is estimated to take up to 12 months in duration. To apply, please view the form and proposal request below. Submit materials to maia.farris@oregonstate.edu by September 30, 2021.

Dr. Thomas (Thom) Field – Counseling Program Chair and Associate Professor
Thomas Field, PhD, is an Associate Professor in the College of Education at Oregon State University. He has taught graduate counseling students since 2011 and previously worked as a faculty member at Boston University School of Medicine. His research focuses on the integration of neuroscience into counseling practice, and professional and social justice advocacy. During his academic career, he has published more than 30 peer-reviewed articles. He has also authored two books on the topic of neuroscience integration. He has received grant funding from agencies that include the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMSHA). His research and teaching has been recognized nationally. In 2019, he received the Counselor Educator of the Year award from the American Mental Health Counselors Association. He is also a current standards revision committee member of the Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP), the recognized specialized accreditation body for counseling. In addition to faculty responsibilities, he has actively helped clients with mental health concerns since 2006. He has provided counseling to more than 1,000 clients during his career and currently maintains a small private practice where he sees adolescents and adults. He is board certified as a counselor and clinical supervisor by the National Board of Certified Counselors and affiliates.

Dr. Beth Rankin – Professor of Practice | Double Degree Program
Beth Rankin joins us from the University of Kansas, where she completed her Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction in 2021. Her dissertation explores secondary traumatic stress in K-12 educators. She also holds an M.S. in Curriculum and Instruction and a B.S. in Elementary Education from the University of Kansas. Beth brings knowledge and experience in K-12, as she has taught elementary school for five years, from kindergarten through fifth grade in Kansas. She has also served as an instructor at the University of Kansas, and she has specialized knowledge of support for ELLs. She has taught a variety of classes, including Curriculum & the Learner in the Elementary School; Student Teaching Seminar; Differentiating Curriculum & Instruction; Assessing English Language Learners; Reading & English Language Learners; Practicum in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages.

John Scholl – Executive Assistant to the Deans
John grew up in Austin, TX, and moved to Eugene, OR in 2009 where his wife, Julie, is from. They have three young school-aged kiddos and are eager Beavers for the new job and town. John has a BSE in Kinesiology and M. Ed. in Sports Management and has worked in non-profit, public, private, and Higher Ed settings in a variety of different leadership and support roles. His most recent position was with PeaceHealth as a Sr. Quality Facilitator. John’s interests outside of work is lots of family time, ministry-related pursuits, going to any live event, and all kinds of recreational fitness pursuits.

About Dr. Molly Moran

Bio: Hello! My name is Molly Moran, and I am a new Clinical Assistant Professor in the Counseling Department. Before joining the OSU- Cascades faculty, I completed my PhD at Boise State University and spent one year as a Visiting Assistant Professor at The College of Idaho. I am a Licensed School Counselor in Oregon and a Licensed Professional Counselor in Idaho. My teaching and research interests include social justice, advocacy, and cultural humility.


Fun Fact: I am an extreme outdoor enthusiast. When I am not in the mountains I am often daydreaming about my next outdoor adventure. I was a competitive ski racer for 15 years and still love to rip around the mountain as much as I did when I was 17.


Why I’m excited to work at CoEd/OSU: I was drawn to OSU because of its commitment to equity, inclusion, and social justice. I look forward to joining a professional community that is actively working towards creating more equitable experiences for students while also engaging in social justice work on campus and in communities.   

About Dr. Lucy Purgason

Biography: I am excited to join my colleagues in the Counseling program at OSU-Cascades as an Assistant Professor. I have worked in counselor education for eight years, including positions at Western Washington University and Appalachian State. I started my professional journey as a school counselor committed to implementing equity-driven and anti-racist school counseling programs in rural, low-income districts in mental health professional shortage areas. I’m passionate about training counseling students to utilize strengths-based, culturally sustaining approaches with students and clients. 

Fun fact/hobby about me: I love being outside enjoying nature but am often underprepared for many of my adventures. I once ran a 5k mud run barefoot (ouch!). 

Why I’m excited to work at CoEd/OSU: My research is informed by my experiences as a school counselor, working at a school specifically for newcomer immigrant and refugee students. I am deeply invested in contributing to knowledge that assists school counselors in delivering comprehensive school counseling programs inclusive of students’ cultural strengths, drawing on social justice frameworks such as Community Cultural Wealth (Yosso, 2005) and Relational-Cultural Theory. I value opportunities to collaborate with colleagues and students and look forward to partnerships through the OSU-Cascades Counseling Clinic and local schools.   

Dear Friends and Colleagues of the College of Education,

The family of Professor Mike O’Malley has asked that we share the details of the funeral services.

Services will be held Friday, July 16, at 11am at St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Corvallis, 501 NW 25 St, Corvallis, OR, 97330. All are welcome.

The passing of Mike O’Malley, a beloved faculty member, is a tremendous loss to the College and community, and we share our deepest condolences with his family and loved ones.

Susan — Susan K. Gardner, Ph.D. (she/her)
Dean of the College of Education


Make a gift

In lieu of flowers, please consider a gift to Mike’s scholarship fund. Gifts can be made to the OSU Foundation at osufoundation.org or mailed to OSU Foundation, 4238 SW Research Way, Corvallis, OR 97333. Please indicate that the gift is in memory of Mike O’Malley.


Event: Sept. 30, 2021 fall community gathering

Join the College of Education and the community at this fall gathering to celebrate Mike’s work and life at OSU. We hope to unveil a dedicated memorial rose bush at this time on the College of Education property.

Attendees will be supported by Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) and the Office of the Dean of Students at this event to facilitate an informal gathering space to remember, support, and share stories of Mike’s legacy.

Event details

Mike O’Malley’s obituary

https://www.gazettetimes.com/news/local/obituaries/michael-joseph-omalley/article_a86bcfa0-d6af-5513-b425-a66afb52ef87.html

Valley Library e-book collection in memory of Mike’OMalley

Click here for book collection list.

Things Overheard at OSU post about Mike

https://www.facebook.com/groups/OSUOverheard/permalink/10159180384234000/

Funeral Services Recording

Free Instructional Design Career Panel | July 21, 2021 | Featuring three Ecampus instructional designers who will be discussing their career pathways and providing tips for those entering the field.

RSVP for the link

Meet the panelists:

Photos of the instructional design  panelists
  • Phil Chambers
    Phil started working for OSU Ecampus as an Instructional Design Specialist at the beginning of 2020, and has been working in the field of education since 2010. His first degree is a BA in Teaching English as a Foreign Language and he has used it to teach English to students in K-12 and higher education in China, Singapore, Macau, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the United States. He also holds a Master of Education in Applied Linguistics, and a Doctor of Education focusing on digital literacy policy. He switched from teaching in-person classes to online course design in 2017. His interest and experience using technology in education has led to prior roles such as Technology Advisor, Senior Academic Manager for blended and online courses, and Coordinator for Digital Innovation.
  • Ashlee Foster
    Ashlee serves as an Instructional Design Specialist with OSU’s Ecampus. She collaborates with faculty across various disciplines to design online and hybrid courses that align with research and industry best practices. Additionally, she designs college orientations that provide all Ecampus students with a supportive transition into major advising. Ashlee holds a Master’s of Science in Education and a certificate in Instructional Design from Western Oregon University. Professional areas of interest include the application of neuro, cognitive and learning science in course design, open pedagogy and open educational practices, Universal Design for Learning, and accessibility.
  • Brittni Racek
    Brittni began working at OSU Ecampus in 2017 and transitioned to the Course Development and Training team as an Instructional Design Specialist in the spring of 2020. She has been in higher education since 2011, with the majority of that time spent working directly with online learners. Some of her previous roles include academic advising, student success counseling, and coaching. Brittni holds an MSEd in Information Technology with a Graduate Certificate in Instructional Design from Western Oregon University and a BA in English Literature from Florida State University. She also teaches online at WOU in the Division of Education and Leadership. She is passionate about advocating for online students and keeping learners at the center of what they do. Some of her primary areas of interest include building community in online learning, developing instructor presence, and exploring the value of learner feedback to improve teaching and design processes.

Dr. Martha Ahrendt | Education PhD Program Lead

Martha’s experience is rooted in philanthropy, non-profits, and community engagement, in roles such as the Vice President for Community Engagement at the Greater Green Bay Community Foundation, Executive Director of Connections for Mental Wellness, and consultant assisting non-profits and foundations. She has helped a variety of stakeholders come together and navigate through complex processes and organizational systems.  She has a doctorate in Art History from Washington University, St. Louis; a Master’s from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; and a Bachelor’s from Carleton College, Northfield, Minnesota. She loves cooking food from around the world, and is looking forward to working with everyone in the College.  

Dr. Becky Crandall | Adult & Higher Education Associate Professor of Practice

Biography: Hello! My name is Dr. Becky Crandall, and I am the new AHE Associate Professor of Practice. I have worked in college and university settings for nearly two decades, including my most recent position as a faculty member in the Higher Education and Student Affairs Program at The Ohio State University. I look forward to getting to know you all; in the meantime, feel free to learn more about me at www.beckycrandall.com. 

Fun fact/hobby about me: While I consider myself a junk food connoisseur, I am also part of the CrossFit community. I promise not to talk about it all the time though!

Why I’m excited to work at CoEd/OSU: I am Dam Proud to be part of the College and its legacy of preparing social-justice-focused change agents. I am also thrilled to finally plant my life in the state that long ago captured my heart.

Niki Weight | Head Advisor

Biography: My passion is making a difference through hearing students’ stories about who they are and where they want to go and helping them achieve their goals. This led me to earn my Bachelor of Science in Sociology from Brigham Young University and a Master of Science in Academic Advising from Kansas State University. I began advising 10 years ago as an Exploratory advisor and then moved to Oregon three years ago to serve as the Director of Student Success and Advising at Western Oregon University before joining the OSU family.

Fun fact/hobby about me: One of my favorite places in the world is the Oregon coast. I didn’t see the beach for the first time until I was in college and now I go as often as I can, even in the winters. I was definitely born in the wrong state and love my Oregon home!

Why I’m excited to work at CoEd/OSU: As someone who was born and raised in a rural community, I love the feel and values of a land grant institution like Oregon State University. The value of education and the impact it can have on a person’s future has been a core value throughout my entire career. These are some of the reasons I am so excited to join the College of Education at OSU to combine my experience as a leader and advisor to help students reach their goal of becoming an educator.

Ana Ramirez | Teaching B.S – CBEE Instructor

Biography:

Ana comes to the College with many years of experience teaching at the K12 and university level, most recently as the ELL Program Coordinator and Teacher in Sutherlin School District and as an instructor for Pacific University and Umpqua Community College. She brings expertise in linguistically and culturally sustaining pedagogy in elementary classrooms, and a commitment to diversity, equity, and inclusion in teacher education.

Fun fact/hobby about me: 

A fun fact about me is that I have hosted eight exchange students from different countries for one year over different times during the past 18 years. A hobby I have is reading and binge-watching Netflix Shows and the Hallmark Channel.

Why I’m excited to work at CoEd/OSU: ​I am really excited about working at the College of Ed at OSU because it is a realization of a lifelong dream to become a Higher Education Instructor.  , I have worked diligently throughout my career to incorporate anti-racist pedagogy into my teaching.  I understand the barriers faced by under-represented or marginalized groups of students, as well as my own experiences meeting the needs of a diverse population of students, staff, and peers. I know I would contribute to the development of a diverse and inclusive learning community at Oregon State University through my teaching, research, and service. One way I would like to continue this is by continuing to evaluate programs, curricula, and teaching strategies designed to enhance participation of under-represented students in higher education.

Graduating College of Education students,

Save the date for this year’s 2021 Commencement which will take place on Saturday, June 12 for Corvallis and Ecampus students. The virtual events will begin with the university’s main commencement celebration from 10:30-11:30 a.m. PDT, followed by pre-recorded school and college ceremonies. The OSU Cascades commencement will take place on June 13 at 9:00 a.m. PDT.

Although virtual, we commit to enable engaging, student-driven Commencement events with personal touches that allow you to be featured if you choose to participate this way. Visit commencement.oregonstate.edu for more information.

> Celebrate with the College of Education with #OSUCoEdGrad and win!

Let’s celebrate together. When you post your grad photos on Instagram, Facebook, or Twitter, use the hashtag #OSUCoEdGrad and tag @osucoed.

Those who tag us and use the #OSUCoEdGrad will be entered into a SWAG giveaway. The 3 random winners will be contacted and mailed College of Ed SWAG items

> Submit a video by May 15th and win a prize!

Represent the college and be highlighted in the college’s virtual commencement video. The University is looking for students to submit a very short video clip (film horizontally) and answering one of the questions below in a complete sentence. Submit videos to maia.farris@oregonstate.edu by May 15th and be entered to win a SWAG giveaway. If you have questions, please email maia.farris@oregonstate.edu

  • Why are you excited to be a teacher, counselor, leader in education, and/or change agent?
  • What album, book, or movie has shaped who you are as a person?
  • How have you surprised yourself while in college?
  • What goal have you achieved that felt really far away your first year in college?
  • What was the best class you took in college, and why?
  • What’s something that you loved doing as a kid that you still love doing as an adult?
  • Best place to study on campus?
  • Make up your own question/answer

> #BeaverGrad checklist:

Congratulations on this big achievement, class of 2021 Beavers. You’re the next generation of teachers, counselors, researchers and leaders in education.

Join the quarterly Alumni Newsletter and follow us on social media to stay in the loop about upcoming community events, professional development, and more. Please keep in touch and let us know where you are and what you’re doing. We’d love to feature you in an upcoming newsletter!

Website | CoEd BlogTwitter | Facebook | Instagram 

Sincerely,
Susan K. Gardner
College of Education, Dean

Spring forum materials organized by Diversity & Inclusion committee co-chair, Tiffany Palaniuk.

Forum Premise: 
Words and their multiple uses reflect the diversity that characterizes our society. Universally agreed upon language on issues related to racism is nonexistent. Even frequently-used words in any discussion on race can easily cause confusion, which leads to controversy and hostility. It is essential to achieve some degree of shared understanding and shared language, particularly when using the most common terms. By doing so, we enhance the quality of dialogue and discourse on race and identity. 
Source: Racial Equity Tools Institute 

Objectives: 

  • Develop a shared language to use when discussing race and identity 
  • Examine how language terms evolve given changing demographics and the dynamic nature of language and understanding 
  • Underscore how historical and contemporary discrimination has shaped the use of racial equity terms 
  • ACTION ITEM:  What do we want them to do with these terms or this enhanced understanding of terms?

In spring 2021, College of Education staff and faculty gathered to reflect on the work being done by Truth, Racial Healing and Transformation (TRHT). TRHT is a national and community-based process occurring in 14 communities across the nation. 

TRHT has several initiatives. The COE’s spring forum focused on TRHT’s initiative to create narrative change through language. To that end, the forum centered on the video #HowWeHeal (link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4b_AWdbksdY). #HowWeHeal shares insights on how language has been used to perpetuate racist and deficit-based narratives; the video also includes ways in which we can consciously shift our language and encourage others to do the same to move away from a deficit-based perspective. Participants explored ways in which racial justice terms impact us on personal, professional, and interpersonal levels. Finally, the forum ended with a focus on why the narrative change in language is important and what we can do in our own practice to work toward narrative change in language. 

Resources:

By: Michelle Klampe | Oregon State University News & Research

In Oregon State University’s College of Education, nearly 100 students in teacher preparation programs this year have faced an extraordinary challenge: learning how to be K-12 teachers in the midst of a global pandemic that closed schools, left many children learning from home and tested even the most seasoned educators.

Oregon State’s future teachers have embraced the moment with grace, flexibility, creativity and perseverance.

“What we have asked of them is just incredible,” said Sara Wright, senior instructor and program lead for the Undergraduate Double Degree and Master’s of Science programs. “I have been really impressed with how they’ve faced this challenge.”

The pandemic has offered important lessons for current and future teachers about educational equity, such as disparities in student access to the Internet; use of technology as a tool for student engagement; collaboration with other teachers; and adapting instruction to meet learners where they are.

Kiley Pugh is student-teaching science to middle- and high-schoolers in Corvallis this year. The shift to virtual instruction helped her learn how to present material and engage with pupils in many different ways, and Pugh is excited to put those skills to use as students return to in-person instruction, she said.

“It really forces you to think about how students learn,” said Pugh, who is pursuing a master’s in science education. “I think this experience will make me a more flexible teacher. Things just aren’t always going to go according to plan. And I’ll have a really good understanding of how to use technology in an in-person classroom after this.”

College instructors have mastered new methods for pupil engagement in an online world alongside the teacher candidates they are supervising. College faculty have also shared their skills and knowledge with the broader education community, developing a web page with resources and support for K-12 teachers and rapidly rolling out a new seminar on teaching with technology for OSU students and faculty as well as teachers in the community last spring and summer.

Sara Wiger, a doctoral student who supervises teaching candidates and also works as an intervention specialist at Husky Elementary School in Corvallis, said her teaching candidates have demonstrated a tremendous ability to engage with their students, even though they didn’t get much if any actual classroom time with them in the fall and winter.

“You could tell they missed being with their students, but they still found ways to connect with them and learn who they are,” Wiger said. “They gained a lot of important teaching skills they wouldn’t normally get, such as learning how to adapt the curriculum to make it work for learners in a variety of settings and situations.”

“One of my teaching candidates used Google Slides to adapt a reading lesson for use online, building all of the steps of the lesson, such as vocabulary prompts, into the slides,” Wiger said. “It made it very accessible to all learners and everyone could participate.”

College of Education administrators and faculty have worked tirelessly to ensure that teaching candidates had appropriate field placements and met the requirements needed to earn their degrees and teaching licenses.

The flexibility of the program allowed Marjorie Baker, an undergraduate pursuing a double degree, to complete her final year of college at home in Kotzebue, Alaska, rather than return to Corvallis. She is student teaching kindergarten in her hometown this year. She hoped staying home would give her a better chance for in-person teaching, which she has been doing since January.

Marjorie and Kelsy
Marjorie and Kelsy in Alaska

“We have been in-person since mid-January,” Baker said. “I am so glad to have this in-person experience during my student teaching year. I feel like it has been a much better representation of what teaching in the future will be like.”

Kelsy Weber, who is pursuing a master’s in mathematics education, also ended up in Kotzebue at the last minute after her original student teaching placement fell through. Weber, a native of Vale, Oregon, is teaching high school math. In Kotzebue, COVID case counts determined whether classes could be in person or not. Weber quickly learned to plan her lessons in multiple formats, in case conditions changed.

 “We really didn’t know from day to day how things were going to go, so we learned to adapt,” she said. “And I’m learning a lot about what my students need from me as a teacher.”

In a virtual world, teachers cannot rely on traditional instructional approaches. They also can’t rely on body language and facial expressions for cues about pupil engagement, said Associate Dean Randy Bell.

As a result, student teachers this year have learned to innovate with technology, getting creative in their use of Zoom breakout rooms and relying extensively on chat messaging to engage with their students. In some cases, they were also able to assist their cooperating teachers with the technological aspects of virtual school.

“Our students have skills that really help in this online environment,” Bell said. “It has been amazing to see our students teaching lessons while simultaneously monitoring and responding to students in a chat. It’s a very complicated and challenging way to teach and our student teachers have risen to the occasion.”