About Dr. Molly Moran

Bio: Hello! My name is Molly Moran, and I am a new Clinical Assistant Professor in the Counseling Department. Before joining the OSU- Cascades faculty, I completed my PhD at Boise State University and spent one year as a Visiting Assistant Professor at The College of Idaho. I am a Licensed School Counselor in Oregon and a Licensed Professional Counselor in Idaho. My teaching and research interests include social justice, advocacy, and cultural humility.


Fun Fact: I am an extreme outdoor enthusiast. When I am not in the mountains I am often daydreaming about my next outdoor adventure. I was a competitive ski racer for 15 years and still love to rip around the mountain as much as I did when I was 17.


Why I’m excited to work at CoEd/OSU: I was drawn to OSU because of its commitment to equity, inclusion, and social justice. I look forward to joining a professional community that is actively working towards creating more equitable experiences for students while also engaging in social justice work on campus and in communities.   

About Dr. Lucy Purgason

Biography: I am excited to join my colleagues in the Counseling program at OSU-Cascades as an Assistant Professor. I have worked in counselor education for eight years, including positions at Western Washington University and Appalachian State. I started my professional journey as a school counselor committed to implementing equity-driven and anti-racist school counseling programs in rural, low-income districts in mental health professional shortage areas. I’m passionate about training counseling students to utilize strengths-based, culturally sustaining approaches with students and clients. 

Fun fact/hobby about me: I love being outside enjoying nature but am often underprepared for many of my adventures. I once ran a 5k mud run barefoot (ouch!). 

Why I’m excited to work at CoEd/OSU: My research is informed by my experiences as a school counselor, working at a school specifically for newcomer immigrant and refugee students. I am deeply invested in contributing to knowledge that assists school counselors in delivering comprehensive school counseling programs inclusive of students’ cultural strengths, drawing on social justice frameworks such as Community Cultural Wealth (Yosso, 2005) and Relational-Cultural Theory. I value opportunities to collaborate with colleagues and students and look forward to partnerships through the OSU-Cascades Counseling Clinic and local schools.   

Dear Friends and Colleagues of the College of Education,

The family of Professor Mike O’Malley has asked that we share the details of the funeral services.

Services will be held Friday, July 16, at 11am at St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Corvallis, 501 NW 25 St, Corvallis, OR, 97330. All are welcome.

The passing of Mike O’Malley, a beloved faculty member, is a tremendous loss to the College and community, and we share our deepest condolences with his family and loved ones.

Susan — Susan K. Gardner, Ph.D. (she/her)
Dean of the College of Education


Make a gift

In lieu of flowers, please consider a gift to Mike’s scholarship fund. Gifts can be made to the OSU Foundation at osufoundation.org or mailed to OSU Foundation, 4238 SW Research Way, Corvallis, OR 97333. Please indicate that the gift is in memory of Mike O’Malley.


Event: Sept. 30, 2021 fall community gathering

Join the College of Education and the community at this fall gathering to celebrate Mike’s work and life at OSU. We hope to unveil a dedicated memorial rose bush at this time on the College of Education property.

Attendees will be supported by Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) and the Office of the Dean of Students at this event to facilitate an informal gathering space to remember, support, and share stories of Mike’s legacy.

Event details

Mike O’Malley’s obituary

https://www.gazettetimes.com/news/local/obituaries/michael-joseph-omalley/article_a86bcfa0-d6af-5513-b425-a66afb52ef87.html

Valley Library e-book collection in memory of Mike’OMalley

Click here for book collection list.

Things Overheard at OSU post about Mike

https://www.facebook.com/groups/OSUOverheard/permalink/10159180384234000/

Funeral Services Recording

Dr. Martha Ahrendt | Education PhD Program Lead

Martha’s experience is rooted in philanthropy, non-profits, and community engagement, in roles such as the Vice President for Community Engagement at the Greater Green Bay Community Foundation, Executive Director of Connections for Mental Wellness, and consultant assisting non-profits and foundations. She has helped a variety of stakeholders come together and navigate through complex processes and organizational systems.  She has a doctorate in Art History from Washington University, St. Louis; a Master’s from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; and a Bachelor’s from Carleton College, Northfield, Minnesota. She loves cooking food from around the world, and is looking forward to working with everyone in the College.  

Dr. Becky Crandall | Adult & Higher Education Associate Professor of Practice

Biography: Hello! My name is Dr. Becky Crandall, and I am the new AHE Associate Professor of Practice. I have worked in college and university settings for nearly two decades, including my most recent position as a faculty member in the Higher Education and Student Affairs Program at The Ohio State University. I look forward to getting to know you all; in the meantime, feel free to learn more about me at www.beckycrandall.com. 

Fun fact/hobby about me: While I consider myself a junk food connoisseur, I am also part of the CrossFit community. I promise not to talk about it all the time though!

Why I’m excited to work at CoEd/OSU: I am Dam Proud to be part of the College and its legacy of preparing social-justice-focused change agents. I am also thrilled to finally plant my life in the state that long ago captured my heart.

Niki Weight | Head Advisor

Biography: My passion is making a difference through hearing students’ stories about who they are and where they want to go and helping them achieve their goals. This led me to earn my Bachelor of Science in Sociology from Brigham Young University and a Master of Science in Academic Advising from Kansas State University. I began advising 10 years ago as an Exploratory advisor and then moved to Oregon three years ago to serve as the Director of Student Success and Advising at Western Oregon University before joining the OSU family.

Fun fact/hobby about me: One of my favorite places in the world is the Oregon coast. I didn’t see the beach for the first time until I was in college and now I go as often as I can, even in the winters. I was definitely born in the wrong state and love my Oregon home!

Why I’m excited to work at CoEd/OSU: As someone who was born and raised in a rural community, I love the feel and values of a land grant institution like Oregon State University. The value of education and the impact it can have on a person’s future has been a core value throughout my entire career. These are some of the reasons I am so excited to join the College of Education at OSU to combine my experience as a leader and advisor to help students reach their goal of becoming an educator.

Ana Ramirez | Teaching B.S – CBEE Instructor

Biography:

Ana comes to the College with many years of experience teaching at the K12 and university level, most recently as the ELL Program Coordinator and Teacher in Sutherlin School District and as an instructor for Pacific University and Umpqua Community College. She brings expertise in linguistically and culturally sustaining pedagogy in elementary classrooms, and a commitment to diversity, equity, and inclusion in teacher education.

Fun fact/hobby about me: 

A fun fact about me is that I have hosted eight exchange students from different countries for one year over different times during the past 18 years. A hobby I have is reading and binge-watching Netflix Shows and the Hallmark Channel.

Why I’m excited to work at CoEd/OSU: ​I am really excited about working at the College of Ed at OSU because it is a realization of a lifelong dream to become a Higher Education Instructor.  , I have worked diligently throughout my career to incorporate anti-racist pedagogy into my teaching.  I understand the barriers faced by under-represented or marginalized groups of students, as well as my own experiences meeting the needs of a diverse population of students, staff, and peers. I know I would contribute to the development of a diverse and inclusive learning community at Oregon State University through my teaching, research, and service. One way I would like to continue this is by continuing to evaluate programs, curricula, and teaching strategies designed to enhance participation of under-represented students in higher education.

By: Michelle Klampe | Oregon State University News & Research

In Oregon State University’s College of Education, nearly 100 students in teacher preparation programs this year have faced an extraordinary challenge: learning how to be K-12 teachers in the midst of a global pandemic that closed schools, left many children learning from home and tested even the most seasoned educators.

Oregon State’s future teachers have embraced the moment with grace, flexibility, creativity and perseverance.

“What we have asked of them is just incredible,” said Sara Wright, senior instructor and program lead for the Undergraduate Double Degree and Master’s of Science programs. “I have been really impressed with how they’ve faced this challenge.”

The pandemic has offered important lessons for current and future teachers about educational equity, such as disparities in student access to the Internet; use of technology as a tool for student engagement; collaboration with other teachers; and adapting instruction to meet learners where they are.

Kiley Pugh is student-teaching science to middle- and high-schoolers in Corvallis this year. The shift to virtual instruction helped her learn how to present material and engage with pupils in many different ways, and Pugh is excited to put those skills to use as students return to in-person instruction, she said.

“It really forces you to think about how students learn,” said Pugh, who is pursuing a master’s in science education. “I think this experience will make me a more flexible teacher. Things just aren’t always going to go according to plan. And I’ll have a really good understanding of how to use technology in an in-person classroom after this.”

College instructors have mastered new methods for pupil engagement in an online world alongside the teacher candidates they are supervising. College faculty have also shared their skills and knowledge with the broader education community, developing a web page with resources and support for K-12 teachers and rapidly rolling out a new seminar on teaching with technology for OSU students and faculty as well as teachers in the community last spring and summer.

Sara Wiger, a doctoral student who supervises teaching candidates and also works as an intervention specialist at Husky Elementary School in Corvallis, said her teaching candidates have demonstrated a tremendous ability to engage with their students, even though they didn’t get much if any actual classroom time with them in the fall and winter.

“You could tell they missed being with their students, but they still found ways to connect with them and learn who they are,” Wiger said. “They gained a lot of important teaching skills they wouldn’t normally get, such as learning how to adapt the curriculum to make it work for learners in a variety of settings and situations.”

“One of my teaching candidates used Google Slides to adapt a reading lesson for use online, building all of the steps of the lesson, such as vocabulary prompts, into the slides,” Wiger said. “It made it very accessible to all learners and everyone could participate.”

College of Education administrators and faculty have worked tirelessly to ensure that teaching candidates had appropriate field placements and met the requirements needed to earn their degrees and teaching licenses.

The flexibility of the program allowed Marjorie Baker, an undergraduate pursuing a double degree, to complete her final year of college at home in Kotzebue, Alaska, rather than return to Corvallis. She is student teaching kindergarten in her hometown this year. She hoped staying home would give her a better chance for in-person teaching, which she has been doing since January.

Marjorie and Kelsy
Marjorie and Kelsy in Alaska

“We have been in-person since mid-January,” Baker said. “I am so glad to have this in-person experience during my student teaching year. I feel like it has been a much better representation of what teaching in the future will be like.”

Kelsy Weber, who is pursuing a master’s in mathematics education, also ended up in Kotzebue at the last minute after her original student teaching placement fell through. Weber, a native of Vale, Oregon, is teaching high school math. In Kotzebue, COVID case counts determined whether classes could be in person or not. Weber quickly learned to plan her lessons in multiple formats, in case conditions changed.

 “We really didn’t know from day to day how things were going to go, so we learned to adapt,” she said. “And I’m learning a lot about what my students need from me as a teacher.”

In a virtual world, teachers cannot rely on traditional instructional approaches. They also can’t rely on body language and facial expressions for cues about pupil engagement, said Associate Dean Randy Bell.

As a result, student teachers this year have learned to innovate with technology, getting creative in their use of Zoom breakout rooms and relying extensively on chat messaging to engage with their students. In some cases, they were also able to assist their cooperating teachers with the technological aspects of virtual school.

“Our students have skills that really help in this online environment,” Bell said. “It has been amazing to see our students teaching lessons while simultaneously monitoring and responding to students in a chat. It’s a very complicated and challenging way to teach and our student teachers have risen to the occasion.”

Cass Dykeman in a mask volunteering to help vaccine efforts

Cass Dykeman, Counseling Professor at the College of Education, is getting out there to help the community.


He says: “I was a volunteer at the Covid Vaccine Clinic this morning at Reser Stadium. I thought it might be great to show CoEd personnel at work to aid the vaccination effort. A lot of my family is involved with health care and I wanted to do something too. So when the call went out for volunteers to help with the vaccine clinic this morning at Reser Stadium I signed up to ferry people that needed assistance getting from the parking lot to Gate C via one of OSU’s golf carts since I am approved for driving with the motor pool. It was cold but it felt great to help out in any way I could. The clinic was extremely well run and I would encourage any of my CoEd colleagues to volunteer too!”

More info about the OSU TRACE program

OSU’s COVID resource site

Recently, Oregon State University held the 39th Annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration.

At this event, President Alexander announced the creation of the President’s Commission on the Status of Black Faculty and Staff Affairs to be co-chaired by Terrance Harris, the director of the Lonnie B. Harris Black Cultural Center, and our very own, Dr. Tenisha Tevis, an Assistant Professor in Adult and Higher Education at the College of Education.

Dr. Tevis is also the 2021 recipient of the Frances Dancy Hooks Award which recognizes Oregon State students, staff or faculty who exemplify Frances Dancy Hooks’ work: building bridges across cultures, showing courage in promoting diversity, and proudly “Walking the Talk.”

Zoom meeting

Can middle schoolers learn computer science concepts using tabletop games? How about during a pandemic, when classroom interaction takes place remotely?

Oregon State University researchers are working closely with teachers to develop an innovative curriculum designed to broaden participation in computer science classes.

Associate Professor and Education Ph.D. Program Chair, Soria Colomer, speaks in the podcast below.

“Soria Colomer was the one giving advice there. She is an associate professor of education and the English-language learner consultant on the grant. “

-Robertson

🎧 Listen now to Engineering Out Loud » beav.es/JGm

Kristen Nielsen
(Above) Dr. Kristen Nielsen

Dr. Kristen Nielsen brings nearly twenty years of teaching, research, and leadership experience in education to her new position with the College of Education at Oregon State University. Dr. Nielsen has extensive experience in program development, assessment, and leadership in higher education and has held several leadership roles in teacher education at the University of Calgary, Boston University, and the University of Massachusetts Lowell. She has directed the planning and redesign of undergraduate curriculum, developed school and community partnership programs, and served as an advocate for social justice, diversity, and inclusion in education.
 
Dr. Nielsen is a specialist in literacies, languages, and language arts, and she has researched and instructed courses in language and literacies for a number of years. She has recently developed courses on migration and schooling practice, with a focus on inclusive and differentiated literacy practices in the U.S., Canada, and Europe, and has served as invited faculty member and presenter at the University of Regensburg, Germany and Tufts University. Her current research explores international and comparative approaches to curriculum development and teaching practice in support of linguistically and culturally diverse learners. She has also studied writing pedagogy for adolescents through higher education and led writing program development and assessment in higher education. Her research in writing focuses on learner-differentiated practice in writing instruction and self-assessment pedagogies. Her work can be viewed in the Journal of Research in ReadingEducational Review, and Adult Learning, among other publications.

April LaGue and Arien Muzacz
April LaGue (left) and Arien Muzacz (right)

By: Lucielle Wones

April LaGue and Arien Muzacz both have long histories in education. April grew up seeing her sister in education and wanted to do something similar. She decided, though, that she preferred the non-teacher aspects of working with students, prompting her to go into counseling. She has been a counselor for 13 schools under grant and student assisting programs. April’s research background focuses on math anxiety and social well-being. Arien’s career in counseling started back in middle school, where she was a peer counselor for her classmates. This sparked a lifelong interest in the field, though her path was less linear. She was the first in her immediate family to complete college and worked in legal and non-profit settings before she returned to her first love of counseling by pursuing a Master’s degree in Clinical Mental Health Counseling. Arien’s research agenda emphasizes diversity and social justice, including health disparities in the areas of substance use and sexual health along with topics in aging, sexuality, addiction, and counselor education and supervision. In addition, Arien and April are both outspoken supporters and members of the LGBTQ community and commit to creating an environment that is safe, healthy, and allows underrepresented voices to have a say. They want the clinical and school sides of counseling to work together and embrace professional unity while increasing equity of opportunity for all their students.

April and Arien are currently focusing on the teaching and learning aspects of pedagogy in online and hybrid counselor education programs. They are co-investigators on a study funded by the Ecampus Research Fellows program to examine the impacts of providing a hybrid orientation to Master’s students in Counseling on students’ self-efficacy and perceptions of wellness. Ecampus’ M.Coun program is part-time and offered in a hybrid (in-person and online) format, which appeals to non-traditional students who may have significant responsibilities within their own communities. Last year, faculty built and piloted orientation models to give students the opportunity to learn about program requirements and Ecampus and OSU resources and to form a bridge between educational backgrounds and classroom expectations. This “virtual mentorship” gives a way to connect with the students more directly before they meet in person in a space that is safe, secure, accessible, and equitable. Their research collects data from students before and after the orientation to evaluate changes in students’ self-efficacy and wellness in response to their active engagement with the online learning modules. 

Once April and Arien publish their findings, they hope that they can use them to help improve the quality of online teaching and advising in counselor education and to consult with other institutions in developing their programs. They believe all grad programs should have an orientation with advisors to connect with. The hybrid model that the Ecampus uses has a lot of potential, and their work aims to prove and popularize the many ways that online orientations can provide students with the tools they need to succeed. Currently, they don’t have access to the big grants that the hard sciences do, though they’re very grateful for the awards they have received for their work. They’re very appreciative of the opportunities given to them by the Ecampus to further their work.