Dr. Thomas (Thom) Field – Counseling Program Chair and Associate Professor
Thomas Field, PhD, is an Associate Professor in the College of Education at Oregon State University. He has taught graduate counseling students since 2011 and previously worked as a faculty member at Boston University School of Medicine. His research focuses on the integration of neuroscience into counseling practice, and professional and social justice advocacy. During his academic career, he has published more than 30 peer-reviewed articles. He has also authored two books on the topic of neuroscience integration. He has received grant funding from agencies that include the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMSHA). His research and teaching has been recognized nationally. In 2019, he received the Counselor Educator of the Year award from the American Mental Health Counselors Association. He is also a current standards revision committee member of the Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP), the recognized specialized accreditation body for counseling. In addition to faculty responsibilities, he has actively helped clients with mental health concerns since 2006. He has provided counseling to more than 1,000 clients during his career and currently maintains a small private practice where he sees adolescents and adults. He is board certified as a counselor and clinical supervisor by the National Board of Certified Counselors and affiliates.

Dr. Beth Rankin – Professor of Practice | Double Degree Program
Beth Rankin joins us from the University of Kansas, where she completed her Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction in 2021. Her dissertation explores secondary traumatic stress in K-12 educators. She also holds an M.S. in Curriculum and Instruction and a B.S. in Elementary Education from the University of Kansas. Beth brings knowledge and experience in K-12, as she has taught elementary school for five years, from kindergarten through fifth grade in Kansas. She has also served as an instructor at the University of Kansas, and she has specialized knowledge of support for ELLs. She has taught a variety of classes, including Curriculum & the Learner in the Elementary School; Student Teaching Seminar; Differentiating Curriculum & Instruction; Assessing English Language Learners; Reading & English Language Learners; Practicum in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages.

John Scholl – Executive Assistant to the Deans
John grew up in Austin, TX, and moved to Eugene, OR in 2009 where his wife, Julie, is from. They have three young school-aged kiddos and are eager Beavers for the new job and town. John has a BSE in Kinesiology and M. Ed. in Sports Management and has worked in non-profit, public, private, and Higher Ed settings in a variety of different leadership and support roles. His most recent position was with PeaceHealth as a Sr. Quality Facilitator. John’s interests outside of work is lots of family time, ministry-related pursuits, going to any live event, and all kinds of recreational fitness pursuits.

About Dr. Molly Moran

Bio: Hello! My name is Molly Moran, and I am a new Clinical Assistant Professor in the Counseling Department. Before joining the OSU- Cascades faculty, I completed my PhD at Boise State University and spent one year as a Visiting Assistant Professor at The College of Idaho. I am a Licensed School Counselor in Oregon and a Licensed Professional Counselor in Idaho. My teaching and research interests include social justice, advocacy, and cultural humility.


Fun Fact: I am an extreme outdoor enthusiast. When I am not in the mountains I am often daydreaming about my next outdoor adventure. I was a competitive ski racer for 15 years and still love to rip around the mountain as much as I did when I was 17.


Why I’m excited to work at CoEd/OSU: I was drawn to OSU because of its commitment to equity, inclusion, and social justice. I look forward to joining a professional community that is actively working towards creating more equitable experiences for students while also engaging in social justice work on campus and in communities.   

About Dr. Lucy Purgason

Biography: I am excited to join my colleagues in the Counseling program at OSU-Cascades as an Assistant Professor. I have worked in counselor education for eight years, including positions at Western Washington University and Appalachian State. I started my professional journey as a school counselor committed to implementing equity-driven and anti-racist school counseling programs in rural, low-income districts in mental health professional shortage areas. I’m passionate about training counseling students to utilize strengths-based, culturally sustaining approaches with students and clients. 

Fun fact/hobby about me: I love being outside enjoying nature but am often underprepared for many of my adventures. I once ran a 5k mud run barefoot (ouch!). 

Why I’m excited to work at CoEd/OSU: My research is informed by my experiences as a school counselor, working at a school specifically for newcomer immigrant and refugee students. I am deeply invested in contributing to knowledge that assists school counselors in delivering comprehensive school counseling programs inclusive of students’ cultural strengths, drawing on social justice frameworks such as Community Cultural Wealth (Yosso, 2005) and Relational-Cultural Theory. I value opportunities to collaborate with colleagues and students and look forward to partnerships through the OSU-Cascades Counseling Clinic and local schools.   

Dear Friends and Colleagues of the College of Education,

The family of Professor Mike O’Malley has asked that we share the details of the funeral services.

Services will be held Friday, July 16, at 11am at St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Corvallis, 501 NW 25 St, Corvallis, OR, 97330. All are welcome.

The passing of Mike O’Malley, a beloved faculty member, is a tremendous loss to the College and community, and we share our deepest condolences with his family and loved ones.

Susan — Susan K. Gardner, Ph.D. (she/her)
Dean of the College of Education


Make a gift

In lieu of flowers, please consider a gift to Mike’s scholarship fund. Gifts can be made to the OSU Foundation at osufoundation.org or mailed to OSU Foundation, 4238 SW Research Way, Corvallis, OR 97333. Please indicate that the gift is in memory of Mike O’Malley.


Event: Sept. 30, 2021 fall community gathering

Join the College of Education and the community at this fall gathering to celebrate Mike’s work and life at OSU. We hope to unveil a dedicated memorial rose bush at this time on the College of Education property.

Attendees will be supported by Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) and the Office of the Dean of Students at this event to facilitate an informal gathering space to remember, support, and share stories of Mike’s legacy.

Event details

Mike O’Malley’s obituary

https://www.gazettetimes.com/news/local/obituaries/michael-joseph-omalley/article_a86bcfa0-d6af-5513-b425-a66afb52ef87.html

Valley Library e-book collection in memory of Mike’OMalley

Click here for book collection list.

Things Overheard at OSU post about Mike

https://www.facebook.com/groups/OSUOverheard/permalink/10159180384234000/

Funeral Services Recording

Julie Epton with her dog Raja

It’s never too late to continue education. Julie Epton went back to school to follow her lifelong dream of becoming a teacher. “Ever since I was a kid, I’ve wanted to be in the healthcare field or teach”, she says.

After running her own neuromuscular therapy business for seven years, Julie Epton is now following another dream of hers – teaching science. Currently, Julie Epton is pursuing a Master of Science in Education at Oregon State University’s College of Education.

About a year and a half ago, Epton moved to Oregon from Michigan and decided to pursue teaching. While living in Washington, D.C., Epton taught an array of sciences for two years in a public charter high school. It was this experience that made Epton want to earn her degree in the field where she always felt she belonged. She also felt that the STEM field “not only needs more women, but needs to support a diverse array of children to get more involved” in science and she believes that she “can fulfill this role by establishing equitable, inclusive classrooms that encourage all children in the practice of science.”

As a STEM educator, Epton believes that “a good STEM education teaches us how to think critically and question the world around us, and how to be smarter consumers of information and more responsible citizens.”

The progressive style of teaching in the Master of Science in Education program, centered on inquiring-based learning and discourse-oriented pedagogy, incorporates Epton’s belief of providing an engaging learning environment and developing critical thinking in students.

Epton loves the program’s focus on Ambitious Science Teaching and social justice, as she is “learning to create culturally relevant, equitable curricula that facilitates students actively engaging in scientific practices and collaborating with peers to develop deeper conceptual understandings.” She laments that her own K-12 education lacked this style of teaching, noting how well it melds active learning with critical thinking and cooperation to create a stimulating educational environment.

The ten month MSEd program is “fast and intense”, but Epton finds it very rewarding thanks to caring, supportive instructors, the student teaching experience at multiple schools, and the connections she has made with her cohort. Epton values the relationships made with her classmates and hopes to maintain a strong bond when everyone begins their first year of teaching. Epton has noticed that with this cohort structure, “[her] learning is greatly enhanced, and the work is exponentially more fun, when you have such a wonderful group [of people] around you.”

Graduate Student Stories- Program: Mathematics Education Ph.D.

After five years of dedication, Allison Dorko is graduating this spring with a PhD in Mathematics Education. Dorko recognized her passion for teaching while she was working on her Bachelor’s in Kinesiology and Physical Education from the University of Maine. Later on, she got her Master’s in Mathematics Education in Maine and “fell in love with the research component” which inspired her to pursue a Ph.D. “in order to do more research and teach college mathematics.”

While at Oregon State, Dorko added a Bachelor’s of Mathematics to her studies before working on her PhD. She especially enjoyed her last two years in the PhD program working with the STEM Club (which is part of the FIESTAS project) at Lincoln and Garfield elementary schools in Corvallis, OR. Dorko says “it is a lot of fun to do maths and science with children and to help the Education majors [in the College of Education] learn how to make maths and science exciting” and “we [even] do maths with Legos!”

Dorko’s years as a student have been busy and she advises other graduate students about the importance of getting enough sleep because “when you’re sleep-deprived, your brain simply doesn’t function well.”

After graduation, Dorko is moving to Oklahoma where she has landed a job as an Assistant Teaching Professor. There, she will “coordinate and supervise their college algebra program, teach mathematics, and do research.” Dorko says, “it’s a great job and I’m excited about it… I’ve heard Oklahoma has amazing storms [and] I’m looking forward to seeing some of those.” Dorko has enjoyed her time here in Corvallis, but she is excited to move on to the next step in her career, “being a faculty member instead of being a student.”

Darlene Russ-Eft-“leading the profession through research”

Since 1984, Darlene Russ-Eft has been an on-going contributor to the Human Resource Development (HRD) field by “leading the profession through research” and the “development of new knowledge”.  She is considered one of the founders of the field of HRD, with a passion for teaching and research that has awarded her with an Academy of Human Resource Development (AHRD) Hall of Fame honor.  

This Hall of Fame award is unique in that it is only given to those who have received the AHRD Outstanding Scholar Award prior. Russ-Eft received this award in 1999 with evidence of scholarly publications that contribute to the fundamental theory and practice of HRD. This practice is more specifically seen in her books and articles that emphasize and highlight the role of program evaluation. At this time Russ-Eft was the Director of Research for Achieve Global, an international training provider. She also contributed to the development and adoption of the AHRD Standards on Ethics and Integrity (AHRD, 1999) and is currently co-chair of a task force working on revisions of those standards. She has served on the AHRD Board, as the vice president for research, and recently as president.

The focus of Russ-Eft’s research involves the connection of human resource development and program evaluation. At OSU, she engages in evaluation of educational programs and activities related to the Bioenergy minor program, the Science and Math Investigative Learning Experience (SMILE) teacher workshops, and the SMILE Summer Bridge program that introduces Bioenergy concepts.

Russ-Eft’s education and research efforts have allowed her to travel as well. As a graduate student, she served as a teaching assistant in undergraduate psychology courses.  While a researcher at the American Institutes for Research in Palo Alto, she taught undergraduate courses in psychology. One of her recent travels for teaching has been to Bangkok, Thailand where she taught a course titled Ethics and Good Governance in Complex Organizations in the doctoral program in Human and Organizational Development at the National Institute for Development Administration (NIDA). Russ-Eft shares that she has also guest-lectured at other universities in the United States and internationally.

Russ-Eft has worked at Oregon State University’s College of Education since 2002. Today she continues her work as a Discipline Liaison in Adult and Higher Education (AHE) and a Professor in the doctoral program for Community College Leadership, Higher Education, and in the AHE Masters program. Russ-Eft shares how she “love[s] both research and teaching” and how she has “enjoyed the various research and evaluation projects that have been a part of [her] OSU position.” She emphasizes that she has especially “enjoyed teaching the various courses here; including Learning Theory at the masters level, Instructional Leadership at the doctoral level, Research Analysis and Interpretation at the doctoral level”, as well as her current courses.  In addition, “advising both masters thesis students and doctoral advisees have been a highlight” for her.

Along with her love for teaching and research, Russ-Eft says, “for fun [she and her] husband, who is a retired Division Counsel (lawyer) for the Army Corps of Engineers, love to travel, hike, bicycle, and cross cross-country ski, and sing in a choir.”

 

Advisor
Karla Rockhold

-People of CoEd- This is Karla Rockhold. She is one of the advisors in the College of Education. With spring term being a busy time of the year, don’t forget that advisors are always here to help! Make an appointment with her if you have any questions. Karla is a great advisor, always positive, and works hard to answer any and all questions you may have. Call 541-737-4661 to make an appointment today!

The counseling program at OSU has come a long way since the founder, Professor Frank H. Shepherd, taught the first counseling course during the Spring Semester of 1917. This year, Oregon State University’s College of Education’s Counseling program is proud to announce the celebration of its 100th anniversary.

Entering the 100th year of counseling, Cass Dykeman shares, that “the centennial is a chance for all of Oregon to celebrate the pivotal role the citizens of the State have played in the continuous development of this profession, [which is] so vital to the health of the nation.” Cass Dykeman, the Associate Professor in Counselor Education at OSU’s College of Education, has been a part of the program’s development since 1998.

After receiving a Master’s in Educational Psychology with a School Counseling concentration and a Doctorate in Counselor Education, Dykeman pursued his passion in the following years as a counselor educator, and as an elementary school and high school counselor in Washington. Although he loves his current job, he admits that he “miss[es] playing football with the kids at recess. You don’t get recess teaching doctoral students!”

Today, Dykeman continues his work as an Associate Professor in the program. His favorite part of the program is working with doctoral students on their dissertations because, “helping advanced students create new knowledge is a thrill” for him. He enjoys the manuscript style of the dissertations, because many of the doctoral students publish their efforts in peer-reviewed journals. Rebecca Bolante is one of Cass’ prior students who has produced two peer-reviewed journal articles from her dissertation about Threat Assessment. Dykeman has already served as a major professor for 24 PhD graduates, and says, “[his] goal is to hit 50 by the time [he] retire[s].”

Dykeman understands that pursuing a doctorate is an overall large investment; but finds the Counseling program unique because, it has offered “distance hybrid education since 1933” and is ranked third oldest for continuously operating counselor education program in the world. Dykeman adds that, the program is “high quality and [has] a proven track record.”

 

Larry Flick– A Message from the Dean

“I am retiring from OSU after 23 years. My decision to retire is mostly personal in that my wife retired last July after 46 years as a high school teacher. It immediately became apparent that I too was ready for our next chapter.  But my decision to retire comes at good time for the college. Eight years ago, the Department of Science and Mathematics Education merged with the College of Education and 4H moved to the College of Public Health and Human Sciences. It was a time of major changes across the entire campus. Now nearly a decade later, the college is very different from what it was. I see this as a good time for college faculty and staff to take stock of their significant accomplishments and look to what they want the college to be in the next decade.

Most immediately, my wife and I will be traveling at times other than summer. We have always enjoyed trips that involve view wildlife, hiking and interacting with the local culture. In July, we’ll be on the Bernese-Oberland Traverse in the Alps. September will be Tuscany followed by joining Global Volunteers in Siedice, Poland working with middle school children in using English while doing science activities. In December, we will be in a boat exploring the coast of Costa Rica and Panama and making a canal transit.” –Larry Flick

—- As we say our farewells, the College would also like to add that we are searching for a new Dean to follow in Larry’s footsteps.

We are seeking a collaborative, inspiring, and entrepreneurial leader to serve as the Dean of Oregon State University’s College of Education. The Dean will work closely with faculty and staff to achieve its vision to be an international leader in research and in the preparation of researchers, scholars, learning leaders, teachers, and counselors who make a difference by promoting innovation, social justice, and lifelong learning and thereby preparing citizens who are socially empowered, reflective, innovative, and caring members of increasingly diverse communities and the world. Learn more about the position.