Dr. Thomas (Thom) Field – Counseling Program Chair and Associate Professor
Thomas Field, PhD, is an Associate Professor in the College of Education at Oregon State University. He has taught graduate counseling students since 2011 and previously worked as a faculty member at Boston University School of Medicine. His research focuses on the integration of neuroscience into counseling practice, and professional and social justice advocacy. During his academic career, he has published more than 30 peer-reviewed articles. He has also authored two books on the topic of neuroscience integration. He has received grant funding from agencies that include the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMSHA). His research and teaching has been recognized nationally. In 2019, he received the Counselor Educator of the Year award from the American Mental Health Counselors Association. He is also a current standards revision committee member of the Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP), the recognized specialized accreditation body for counseling. In addition to faculty responsibilities, he has actively helped clients with mental health concerns since 2006. He has provided counseling to more than 1,000 clients during his career and currently maintains a small private practice where he sees adolescents and adults. He is board certified as a counselor and clinical supervisor by the National Board of Certified Counselors and affiliates.

Dr. Beth Rankin – Professor of Practice | Double Degree Program
Beth Rankin joins us from the University of Kansas, where she completed her Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction in 2021. Her dissertation explores secondary traumatic stress in K-12 educators. She also holds an M.S. in Curriculum and Instruction and a B.S. in Elementary Education from the University of Kansas. Beth brings knowledge and experience in K-12, as she has taught elementary school for five years, from kindergarten through fifth grade in Kansas. She has also served as an instructor at the University of Kansas, and she has specialized knowledge of support for ELLs. She has taught a variety of classes, including Curriculum & the Learner in the Elementary School; Student Teaching Seminar; Differentiating Curriculum & Instruction; Assessing English Language Learners; Reading & English Language Learners; Practicum in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages.

John Scholl – Executive Assistant to the Deans
John grew up in Austin, TX, and moved to Eugene, OR in 2009 where his wife, Julie, is from. They have three young school-aged kiddos and are eager Beavers for the new job and town. John has a BSE in Kinesiology and M. Ed. in Sports Management and has worked in non-profit, public, private, and Higher Ed settings in a variety of different leadership and support roles. His most recent position was with PeaceHealth as a Sr. Quality Facilitator. John’s interests outside of work is lots of family time, ministry-related pursuits, going to any live event, and all kinds of recreational fitness pursuits.

Dr. Martha Ahrendt | Education PhD Program Lead

Martha’s experience is rooted in philanthropy, non-profits, and community engagement, in roles such as the Vice President for Community Engagement at the Greater Green Bay Community Foundation, Executive Director of Connections for Mental Wellness, and consultant assisting non-profits and foundations. She has helped a variety of stakeholders come together and navigate through complex processes and organizational systems.  She has a doctorate in Art History from Washington University, St. Louis; a Master’s from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; and a Bachelor’s from Carleton College, Northfield, Minnesota. She loves cooking food from around the world, and is looking forward to working with everyone in the College.  

Dr. Becky Crandall | Adult & Higher Education Associate Professor of Practice

Biography: Hello! My name is Dr. Becky Crandall, and I am the new AHE Associate Professor of Practice. I have worked in college and university settings for nearly two decades, including my most recent position as a faculty member in the Higher Education and Student Affairs Program at The Ohio State University. I look forward to getting to know you all; in the meantime, feel free to learn more about me at www.beckycrandall.com. 

Fun fact/hobby about me: While I consider myself a junk food connoisseur, I am also part of the CrossFit community. I promise not to talk about it all the time though!

Why I’m excited to work at CoEd/OSU: I am Dam Proud to be part of the College and its legacy of preparing social-justice-focused change agents. I am also thrilled to finally plant my life in the state that long ago captured my heart.

Niki Weight | Head Advisor

Biography: My passion is making a difference through hearing students’ stories about who they are and where they want to go and helping them achieve their goals. This led me to earn my Bachelor of Science in Sociology from Brigham Young University and a Master of Science in Academic Advising from Kansas State University. I began advising 10 years ago as an Exploratory advisor and then moved to Oregon three years ago to serve as the Director of Student Success and Advising at Western Oregon University before joining the OSU family.

Fun fact/hobby about me: One of my favorite places in the world is the Oregon coast. I didn’t see the beach for the first time until I was in college and now I go as often as I can, even in the winters. I was definitely born in the wrong state and love my Oregon home!

Why I’m excited to work at CoEd/OSU: As someone who was born and raised in a rural community, I love the feel and values of a land grant institution like Oregon State University. The value of education and the impact it can have on a person’s future has been a core value throughout my entire career. These are some of the reasons I am so excited to join the College of Education at OSU to combine my experience as a leader and advisor to help students reach their goal of becoming an educator.

Ana Ramirez | Teaching B.S – CBEE Instructor

Biography:

Ana comes to the College with many years of experience teaching at the K12 and university level, most recently as the ELL Program Coordinator and Teacher in Sutherlin School District and as an instructor for Pacific University and Umpqua Community College. She brings expertise in linguistically and culturally sustaining pedagogy in elementary classrooms, and a commitment to diversity, equity, and inclusion in teacher education.

Fun fact/hobby about me: 

A fun fact about me is that I have hosted eight exchange students from different countries for one year over different times during the past 18 years. A hobby I have is reading and binge-watching Netflix Shows and the Hallmark Channel.

Why I’m excited to work at CoEd/OSU: ​I am really excited about working at the College of Ed at OSU because it is a realization of a lifelong dream to become a Higher Education Instructor.  , I have worked diligently throughout my career to incorporate anti-racist pedagogy into my teaching.  I understand the barriers faced by under-represented or marginalized groups of students, as well as my own experiences meeting the needs of a diverse population of students, staff, and peers. I know I would contribute to the development of a diverse and inclusive learning community at Oregon State University through my teaching, research, and service. One way I would like to continue this is by continuing to evaluate programs, curricula, and teaching strategies designed to enhance participation of under-represented students in higher education.

A podcast created by KOIN news 6

Justin Roach, program lead of the MAT in Clinically Based Elementary and Chelsey Williams, continuing education manager were featured in a KOIN Podcast: “Coronavirus Podcast: What can we learn from distance learning?
 
Listen to learn more about how far distance learning has come since last spring, what needs improvement and a glimpse into how education is changing.  Both Roach and Williams delve into remote learning during COVID times. This is a hard time to be a teacher, which is why the college is working to provide K-12 teachers with a variety of synchronous and asynchronous resources.

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Congratulations to faculty member Gloria Crisp for receiving the 2020 ASHE Mentoring Award. Crisp is a Professor and Program Chair of the Adult and Higher Education programs at Oregon State University.

ASHE (Association for the study of Higher Education) awards recognize exemplary achievements and contributions to the study of higher education through research, leadership, or service to ASHE and the field of higher education. Crisp has a long record of sustained, wide-reaching, and transformative mentoring of emerging scholars. Above and beyond mentorship as a condition of academic service, Crisp has studied mentorship as a mechanism for addressing inequities facing marginalized groups and, most notably, has extended this line of inquiry into her everyday practice. In ASHE, she has consistently mentored new faculty members as chair of the Early Career Faculty Workshop. 

Additionally, Crisp has recently published their research on Empirical and Practical Implications for Documenting Early Racial Transfer Gaps with co-authors and AHE doctoral students, Charlie Potter and Rebecca Robertson. The chapter reveals racial and ethnic inequities in transfer.

We congratulate you for your hard work, Gloria!

 

Rebecca Bolante By Maia Farris

Rebecca Bolante: Director of Threat AssessmentWhen trying to prevent a tragedy, OSU alumna and Director of Threat Assessment, Rebecca Bolante, says threat assessment is “not about finding someone who would do something bad, it is the opposite — it is about creating a supportive plan so their situation changes.”

Rebecca Bolante is a stellar graduate from the Oregon State University College of Education who was studying in the PhD in Counseling program when the Virginia Tech shooting occurred. This event sparked her interest in threat assessment, and she changed her research focus to answer the question, “How can we prevent something like this happening in Higher Education?”

In 2014, Bolante graduated from Oregon State University with a Ph.D. in Counselor Education and Supervision. Bolante continues her work as the Director of Threat Assessment Management programs at Chemeketa Community College in Salem, Oregon. Along with her Ph.D., her education background includes a Master’s degree in Rehabilitation Counseling and a Bachelor’s in Psychology with a minor in Criminal Justice from Western Oregon University.

Bolante was first introduced to the counseling program here at OSU when one of her professors spoke highly of the program. The flexible, hybrid program including both online and on-campus classes was perfect for her needs. Working full time and as a mother made finishing a degree more challenging, but her passion of caring for others, education, and research propelled her to earn her degree.

With her research on threat assessment, she learned the best tactics to prevent violence and continues to share these techniques with various professionals like counselors, law enforcement, human resources, and legal counsels . “The key to threat assessment”, she says, “is a team approach”. Overall her research created the Threat Management Resources program at Chemeketa. This program focuses on three parts: prevention (threat assessment), what to do during an event, and disaster behavioral health recovery, and can result in a certificate.

Currently, Bolante’s work at CCC is filling the need to provide the support, education, and training in Threat Management for working professionals. The program has even expanded to places outside of the state to provide the training where it is needed. Bolante’s work doesn’t just engage with the national conversation about mental health and safety nationwide, she contributes to it.

At the beginning of her research she thought that all campuses had threat assessment teams, given they are highly recommended by the Secret Service, FBI, and the U.S. Department of Education. In reality, most colleges and communities do not have someone like Bolante to help facilitate the aftermath of traumatizing events; however, she hopes that her workshops on how to set up a response room, to-go box, and other trainings will help see an increase. She believes campuses should all have threat assessment teams because “there is a need and it continues to grow”. Fortunately, here at Oregon State we have our own Threat Assessment Team with Oregon State Police lieutenant, Eric Judah, co-founder of the team, who also assists Bolante with various training.

After learning about the College of Education’s new Master of Counseling in Clinical Mental Health program, Bolante expressed interest in the online aspect. She shared that her last part of her academics was online and although she originally questioned how it would work out, she stated that “the online experience went very well…[because] it is very efficient to handle the details. I can see how it would benefit counselors in training”.

Some improvements that Bolante hopes for the future is more work in counselor education involving threat assessment and disaster behavioral health. Bolante admits that she “made an assumption that counselors have training [in disaster response], and although there is more now, it is a different skill set with emphasis on psychological aid.” She also emphasizes the importance in education about spirituality and belief systems because they play a significant part of responding to disasters since “people’s belief systems oftentimes get confused and unsure during these times”.

One thing she loves about her job is seeing people “get off the pathway to violence and receiving positive support”. Bolante shares that “if we could learn more about the warning signs and report them prior to an incident we could reduce mass violence.” With work keeping her busy and oftentimes dealing with dark topics, she knows how important self care is and enjoys gardening, music and family time.

Bolante is fortunate to have her hard work and determination supported by her family, husband, and children. Another person who is a continuing supporter of Bolante’s education and work is Dr. Cass Dykeman, a faculty member in OSU’s Counselor Education program. Bolante says that he has “been a champion for these initiatives” and together, they have created recent publications; including one this year.

screen-shot-2014-07-03-at-3-22-05-pmFirst Lady Michelle Obama addressed the critical role of school counselors in helping students successfully complete high school and pursue post-secondary options recently when she was made an honorary school counselor at the annual American School Counselor Association conference

“College is for everyone,” according to Mrs. Obama.  “Every student in this country needs some higher education, whether that’s a two-year degree, a four-year degree, or professional training of some sort.”

Unfortunately, with one of the lowest high school graduation rates in the nation, Oregon’s students will certainly struggle to achieve this goal, which is part of both the White House’s College Opportunity Agenda and Oregon’s 40-40-20 legislative mandate.

Research continues to show that the leadership and collaboration provided by school counselors not only increases student achievement and post-secondary matriculation through college and career readiness planning, but is instrumental in creating environments that help students overcome obstacles which are affecting their ability to learn.

In a recent letter to chief state school officers, Arne Duncan echoed Mrs. Obama’s call to action when he asked leaders to find “systemic and sustainable” support for school counselors.

School counselors are more important than ever to Oregon students, families, and school staff members with forty percent of our state’s children identified as being exposed “to the social-economic, physical, or relational risk factors that adversely impair their ability to develop the foundations of school success.” (Oregon Learns: Executive Summary-OEIB Report to the Legislature, December 2011.)

Before outlining the newest federal funds available to support, hire, and train school counselors; Mrs. Obama stated that school counseling “is a necessity to ensure that all our young people get the education they need to succeed in today’s economy.”

Only eight states have a worse counselor-to-student ratio than Oregon, and Mrs. Obama called the national average, “outrageous.”   Making matters worse, Oregon has never established staffing or funding mandates for school counselors.  While the importance of equitable student access to professional school counselors is at the forefront of a national conversation, Oregon’s educational leaders and politicians should take the necessary steps to ensure that its students are better prepared for academic success, social-emotional well-being, and college and career readiness through the resources and support provided by school counselors.

For more on this topic, please see a previous post: Where Are The School Counselors?.

Gene Eakin has a doctorate in educational psychology from the University of Oregon and worked in the public school for over 30 years, including 23 years in the Lebanon School District.  He is the School Counseling Program Lead in Oregon State University’s College of Education and advocacy chair for the Oregon School Counselor Association (OSCA).   Dr. Gene Eakin can be reached at gene.eakin@oregonstate.edu .

STEM Workshops for Educators: Offered by OSU research faculty. Free. Lunch provided. Limited funds available to support lodging costs for  participants more than 80 miles away.

Here’s the summer schedule of workshops:

  • July 31-Aug. 1: Explorations in Nanotechnology for 6-12th Grade Educators.
  • Aug. 11-12: Climate Change and Ocean Acidification.
  • Aug. 14-15: Biological Motions through the Lens-An Advanced Light Microscopy Workshop.

To register or for more information, email Kari van Zee, Program  Coordinator STEPs, at vanzeek@science.oregonstate.edu541-737-1773.

It might be summer but last week Furman Hall was buzzing with teachers and over 30 middle school students from Lane County who participated in the first Quality Teaching and Learning Institute.

The five-day QTL Summer Institute, supported by the OEIB and hosted by OSU, focused on the development of pedagogical skills that will prepare a new generation of teachers to work with students meeting the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS).

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The institute engaged teams in rethinking educator preparation pedagogy approaches to better support models of teacher preparation. Participants include arts and science faculty, educator preparation faculty, and K-12 school partners.

Participants built:

  • a common vision of high quality instruction,
  • a shared language to describe and analyze teaching, and
  • a means for articulating core practices that can be examined and improved.

Learn more about the QTL Summer Institute here.

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Via Press Release

College of Education logo(Corvallis, OR)- The Chief Education Office will be co-hosting a Quality Teaching and Learning Summer Institute at Oregon State University (OSU) from June 23-27. The inaugural institute will focus on the development of teacher candidate skills that will prepare them to support students on meeting the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). The five- day institute will engage educator teams in rethinking approaches to most effectively support teacher preparation. Cohosts include the Oregon Department of Education and the Oregon Core to College grant.

Institutional teams representing major Oregon universities offering educator certification programs will be attending including: Eastern Oregon University, George Fox University, Oregon State University, Pacific University, Southern Oregon University, University of Oregon and University of Portland. Together these institutions prepared 44% of new Oregon teachers during the 2012-13 year.

“Charged with improving outcomes for students from birth to college and career, the Oregon Education Investment Board (OEIB) knows that the single-greatest in-school factor for student success is an educator” said Chief Education Officer, Nancy Golden. “The Summer Institute will create a focused and dynamic opportunity for the Network for Quality Teaching and Learning to bring educators together to reflect on, and refine their approach to preparing new teachers to effectively support student success.”

The Network for Quality Teaching and Learning was created by HB 3233 to strengthen recruitment, preparation, induction-year support, and ongoing professional development for Oregon’s educators. The Network empowers educators to help implement curriculum needed to support students‘ success, document the impacts on results and infuse current preparation programs with in-the-field practices that are working for Oregon’s students.

The institute will feature morning sessions in which arts and science faculty, educator preparation faculty, and K-12 school partners will observe and participate in lessons with middle school students.

Attendees will then use reflective discourse to determine core practices identified to successfully engage students and further learning.

The institute is designed around the tenet that teachers improve their instructional skill by engaging in the work of teaching. To facilitate that opportunity, more than 30 youth from the Lane Equity Achievement Project (LEAP) program will actively participate in portions of the institute. LEAP’s mission is to ensure that each child in Lane County has opportunities for intellectual growth and success regardless of their location or need. While on the OSU campus the attending LEAP students have a host of opportunities to explore the college and future careers.

“The Lane middle school students will have opportunities to experience some of the best that OSU campuses have to offer, said Nell O’Malley, Director of Education Licensure at OSU. “In addition to being part of the institute, students will participate in hands-on STEM activities such as robotics, tsunami and wave exploration, and computer animation. They will spend time at OSU’s Hatfield Marine Science Center for remotely operation vehicles development and estuary investigations. Throughout the week students will be chaperoned by STEM students at OSU and campus leaders creating multiple opportunities to explore career pathways. ”

Each afternoon, scheduled sessions will be open to the public. Sessions will address recruitment and retention of culturally and linguistically diverse educators, the new performance assessment (edTPA) adopted by Teacher Standards and Practices Commission, recent results from statewide surveys of educators, and even a demonstration that uses avatars to help future educators practice classroom management skills. Materials will also be available online after the institute has concluded. For a full schedule of events and additional information on the institute, click here.

The Oregon Education Investment Board (OEIB) is chaired by Governor John Kitzhaber, and led by the Chief Education Officer. It was created in 2011 to oversee an effort to build a seamless, unified system for investing in and delivering public education from birth to college & career. OEIB is dedicated to building a student-centric system that links all segments of the educational experience together to ensure each student is poised for a promising future. 

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The office of Childcare & Family Resources is currently accepting nominations for the 2013-14 Family Friendly Faculty Award. The Family Friendly Faculty Award is awarded to a faculty or staff member who has provided exemplary support to an OSU student with children.

Support may come in the form of mentoring, encouragement, accommodations, or anything parents have found helpful in and out of the classroom to remove barriers to success and/or elevating the campus awareness of students with children.

If you know of someone deserving this award, please take a few moments to write a nomination letter including within: their name and department, your name and department, why you would like to nominate this person, and examples of ways they have helped you (or someone you know) be successful at OSU. Nomination letters are due to amy.luhn@oregonstate.edu  or delivered to the Childcare & Family Resources office before July 31, 2014.