Dr. Randy Bell with his motorbike
Dr. Randy Bell with his brand new motorbike.

Hà Nội Ơi!

Greetings from Vietnam! In my regular job, I serve as Associate Dean of Academic Affairs and Science Education Professor at OSU’s College of Education. This year I’m on the very first sabbatical of my career, serving as visiting professor in the University of Education at Vietnam National University (VNU). I am also honored to serve here as a Fulbright Scholar.

The Fulbright Program is the U.S. government’s flagship international cultural exchange program, whose goal is to promote understanding between nations, advance knowledge across communities, and improve lives worldwide. As a Fulbright Scholar, I teach science education classes, provide professional development for VNU faculty, assist students and faculty with English speaking skills, and explore the possibility of a teaching internship for OSU students in Hà Nội schools. Even my day-to-day activities are part of the Fulbright mission, as I interact with my Vietnamese friends and neighbors and promote good will and mutual understanding.

Being introduced to VNU Faculty of Natural Sciences. (Photo by Randy Bell.)

This will be the first in a series of blogs that, along with plenty of photos, will recount my experiences in Vietnam. Through these updates, I hope not only to share more about this beautiful country and its people, but how my work as a faculty member of the College of Education is impacting university faculty and students on the other side of the world. 

My first full month in Vietnam (October) was very busy! I moved into offices on two campuses and participated in Freshman welcoming ceremonies at the newly opened Hoa Lac VNU campus. This month I also conducted a half-dozen faculty seminars, taught three lessons to science education students, led Vietnamese children on a museum tour, provided three keynote addresses and was interviewed by a national Morning Show TV host. I even purchased a motorbike for transportation.

Keynote address for grand opening of VNU University of Education new location at Hoa Lac. (Photo by Randy Bell.)

Speaking of motorbikes, traffic is something else here in Hà Nội! Traffic rules are viewed simply as mild suggestions, and it’s not uncommon to see drivers blatantly run red lights or drive the wrong way on a six-lane highway! Even crossing the street is hazardous, as pedestrians do not have the right of way. Westerners here exclaim in frustration (and fear) that Hà Nội traffic is crazy, and most can’t believe I drive here. But I think that’s not the only way to look at it– Hà Nội traffic norms are undoubtedly different from what’s familiar, but they work for Hà Nội. In the US, we (generally) obey traffic rules so that we can drive safely at high speeds on fairly open roads. In Hà Nội, where the roads are exponentially more crowded, it’s the driver’s responsibility to maintain a reasonable speed and anticipate other drivers and pedestrians to make unexpected moves. When this happens, you simply drive around the temporary obstacle while beeping your horn. In this way, traffic flows, and people get where they’re going even when the traffic is extremely heavy. 

I see Hà Nội traffic as a metaphor for my Fulbright experience here in Vietnam. The language, professional, and cultural norms here differ significantly from what I’ve known as an OSU professor. As a visitor to this rich culture, I am enjoying the opportunity to experience these differences and step outside of my comfort zone as I consider new possibilities for how to work and live productively. I am blessed with new friends and colleagues eager to guide me on this journey to understand and become a better-connected citizen of the world. Living abroad can be difficult, and even a little scary at times, but just like crossing a busy street in Hà Nội, faith, courage, and little help from your friends can get you where you want to be.

My home for the next year is the Nam Từ Liêm district of Hà Nội, the capital city of Vietnam. Being from Oregon, I’m used to rainy weather, but still adjusting to the high temperature and higher humidity here.

Sunset on West lake, Hà Nội
Sunset on West lake, Hà Nội. (Photo by Randy Bell)

People have been living in Hà Nội for more than 1,000 years, so there’s plenty to do and see when I’m not engaged in professional duties.  My colleagues and I have formed an English Club in which they hone their conversational English skills and I work on my Vietnamese. We always have a great time, and travel around Hà Nội for great food and views. Of all the wonderful things I’ve experienced in Vietnam, the best is the friendship and good times I’ve enjoyed with my new colleagues.

Till next time, Tạm biệt! Randy

Photo of a person sitting with a laptop in front of them on a desk and their hand on a computer mouse.

Dr. Arien K. Muzacz, clinical associate professor for the College of Education’s Master of Counseling Clinical Mental Health Counseling program, is helping usher in a new era where counseling services will reach clients through technology. 

Last fall, Dr. Muzacz was the recipient of a professional development award from the National Board for Certified Counselors (NBCC); this summer, she completed required trainings and a national exam to earn a new credential, the BC-TMH (Board Certification in Telemental Health). The award, which is presented through the NBCC’s Center for Credentialing & Education, included a $500 award to help Dr. Muzacz facilitate professional development in the area of telemental health.

The NBCC is the nation’s premier certification board devoted to credentialing those who meet standards for the general and specialty practices of professional counseling. The organization also provides what is considered the Gold Standard for those practicing remotely or specializing in telemental health. 

Telehealth, which is the distribution of health-related services through technology, is not new. Many Oregonians have used technology to communicate with their health care providers in some form or another, whether it is setting up appointments, checking lab results, or consulting on a new health concern. However, telehealth became more common and more vital during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic. But, the telehealth innovations that came out of that global crisis do not always benefit clients in need of counseling services. 

Beyond the obvious privacy concerns, many Oregonians may not have access to internet-ready devices, or the bandwidth needed to get telehealth services. Even in heavily populated areas like Portland, potential clients may rely on libraries or other public spaces for their internet access — hardly an ideal situation for a counseling session. 

“As counselors, we are always looking for ways to reduce barriers for our clients,” said Dr. Muzacz. “Telehealth has great potential in this area. Even without the pandemic, telehealth could help counselors reach those living in very rural locations, or in smaller communities where in-person counseling services are few or nonexistent.”

But barriers still exist. Beyond access to the needed technology, Dr. Muzacz notes that it is vital for counselors to ensure confidentiality and implement best practices to make sure clients receive the same quality of care they would when meeting with a counselor in person.

“During the height of the pandemic, some privacy requirements through the Health and Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) were waived as the need for telemental health grew during an unprecedented crisis,” said Dr. Muzacz. “But as social distancing and other restrictions have eased, those exemptions are being reversed and counselors providing remote services will need to adapt to ensure privacy for their clients.”

Dr. Muzacz’s NBCC certification will allow her to build on her own expertise as a professional counselor and set an example for many of the College of Education Master’s students who are considering careers in telemental health.

“Due largely to the COVID-19 pandemic, working from home is very appealing to many of our students,” Dr. Muzacz said. “It’s our responsibility to fill in the gaps in their training to make sure they’re providing the highest quality care. I’m looking forward to helping them integrate these standards into their professional practice.”

The College of Education congratulates Dr. Muzacz on her award and the vital work she does for our students and our fellow Oregonians.

Post written by Marsh Myers

When Greg Garcia discovered he was named 2021 Oregon History Teacher of the Year, all he could think about was Mike O’Malley. The senior instructor in the College of Education had died the previous day.

“Mike O’Malley is the entire reason why I’m in education right now,” Garcia says.  “I dedicate my award to Mike’s memory. Everything I do as a teacher is based on his example.”

Garcia was first introduced to O’Malley when he came to Oregon State in 2014. After receiving his master’s degree in American history from Western Oregon University, Garcia simultaneously earned his teaching license from Oregon State. Garcia was enrolled in both the ELA/Social Studies and English Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) programs.

He now teaches Advanced Placement U.S. history and AP psychology at Franklin High School in Portland.

When Garcia graduated from Western Oregon University, he hoped to work at the U.S. State Department in the field of U.S./Latin American relations. He felt that if he worked hard enough, he could make history.

Garcia did go on to make history, just not in the way he thought he would.

From Dread to Gratitude

Education wasn’t Garcia’s initial career choice. After graduating from Western Oregon University his stepmother, an elementary school principal, along with his mother, a middle school English teacher, suggested Garcia go into teaching.

“At first, I was a little hesitant, because it’s a hard job,” he says.

Garcia experienced the lows early on. As a student-teacher, he was placed with a bilingual social studies teacher, at a school that ranked low in technology and had a 93% poverty rate.

Garcia recalls one of the most pivotal moments as a student-teacher being a day at school when his students erupted in aggression, yelling and throwing garbage at him.

Garcia came to dread the idea of being a teacher, thinking he wasn’t made for the job. But after an invitation to coffee with O’Malley, things changed.

“He talked me off the proverbial ledge and convinced me that things would get better,” Garcia says. “Every day I’m in the classroom I’m thankful Mike convinced me to stay.”

Garcia says he realized the significance O’Malley’s mentorship and teaching philosophy had on him after O’Malley’s death.

“Mike O’Malley did the heavy lifting over one of the worst chapters of my life,” he says. “Meeting Mike was my axial moment.”

Garcia also attributes his strengths as an educator to his stepmother for teaching him practicality, and his biological mother who taught him creativity. One of the most valuable lessons he learned from them was the idea that he must attend to a student’s needs before he can teach them. He does this every day, providing snacks and resources in his classroom.

Creating “well-informed citizens”

Franklin High School has a diverse student population, and Garcia’s classroom incorporates practical learning experiences into his teaching. Students explore a wide range of history topics, and they can participate in culturally diverse activities.

Before he was a teacher, during his time at Oregon State, Garcia designed museum exhibits, and that experience lives on in his classroom. He’s made graduate-level education available to traditionally underserved students with the opportunity to research and build their own exhibit on a historical narrative of their choosing. The exhibits are installed on campus and open to the public in the spring.

“I wish Mike O’Malley could see what has happened here because at Franklin, at one time we had more AP U.S. history classes than we did standard,” he says.

Garcia hopes to make AP U.S. history classes available to a wider variety of demographics, because of how important he believes history is to his students’ education.

“I firmly believe that history needs to have a higher priority,” he says. “My goal is to make students well-informed citizens.

“One of the things I feel very passionate about as an instructor is helping kids find their full potential. It’s all about reaching students where they are and helping them go in the direction they want to go.”

As Oregon History Teacher of the Year, Garcia says he hopes to see his methods of education be adopted nationwide.

“This award gives me the legitimacy and ethos to make that happen,” he says. “It gives me the opportunity and authority to try to bring about significant change in the field of social studies and history. And to continue the journey on which Mike started me on. I hope to do for others what he did for me.”

From his time at Oregon State to his career at Franklin High School, Garcia says he takes pride in the work he’s done and the experiences he’s had.

“Every person in the College of Education played a really supportive role in helping me reorganize and reorient the trajectory of my life. Oregon State helped me find focus and made it all possible.”

The History Teacher of the Year Award is given by the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History to teachers in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and U.S. Territories. As Oregon’s honoree, Garcia received a $1,000 prize, an archive of American history books and Gilder Lehrman educational materials. Garcia will be recognized at an award ceremony in the spring. 

Mike O’Malley’s legacy and memory lives on in the College of Education and in the many lives he touched. A memorial plaque is hung on the first floor of Furman Hall and a collection of memorial pieces can be viewed in this blog post.

Looking for contract work as a Web Designer/Developer?

OSU College of Education is seeking proposals for the redesign and redevelopment of the College of Education’s (CoEd) online web presence. We seek a Web Designer/Developer who is familiar with Drupal 7 and/or is familiar with web development and implementation for marketing purposes. The project is estimated to take up to 12 months in duration. To apply, please view the form and proposal request below. Submit materials to maia.farris@oregonstate.edu by September 30, 2021.

Dr. Thomas (Thom) Field – Counseling Program Chair and Associate Professor
Thomas Field, PhD, is an Associate Professor in the College of Education at Oregon State University. He has taught graduate counseling students since 2011 and previously worked as a faculty member at Boston University School of Medicine. His research focuses on the integration of neuroscience into counseling practice, and professional and social justice advocacy. During his academic career, he has published more than 30 peer-reviewed articles. He has also authored two books on the topic of neuroscience integration. He has received grant funding from agencies that include the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMSHA). His research and teaching has been recognized nationally. In 2019, he received the Counselor Educator of the Year award from the American Mental Health Counselors Association. He is also a current standards revision committee member of the Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP), the recognized specialized accreditation body for counseling. In addition to faculty responsibilities, he has actively helped clients with mental health concerns since 2006. He has provided counseling to more than 1,000 clients during his career and currently maintains a small private practice where he sees adolescents and adults. He is board certified as a counselor and clinical supervisor by the National Board of Certified Counselors and affiliates.

Dr. Beth Rankin – Professor of Practice | Double Degree Program
Beth Rankin joins us from the University of Kansas, where she completed her Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction in 2021. Her dissertation explores secondary traumatic stress in K-12 educators. She also holds an M.S. in Curriculum and Instruction and a B.S. in Elementary Education from the University of Kansas. Beth brings knowledge and experience in K-12, as she has taught elementary school for five years, from kindergarten through fifth grade in Kansas. She has also served as an instructor at the University of Kansas, and she has specialized knowledge of support for ELLs. She has taught a variety of classes, including Curriculum & the Learner in the Elementary School; Student Teaching Seminar; Differentiating Curriculum & Instruction; Assessing English Language Learners; Reading & English Language Learners; Practicum in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages.

John Scholl – Executive Assistant to the Deans
John grew up in Austin, TX, and moved to Eugene, OR in 2009 where his wife, Julie, is from. They have three young school-aged kiddos and are eager Beavers for the new job and town. John has a BSE in Kinesiology and M. Ed. in Sports Management and has worked in non-profit, public, private, and Higher Ed settings in a variety of different leadership and support roles. His most recent position was with PeaceHealth as a Sr. Quality Facilitator. John’s interests outside of work is lots of family time, ministry-related pursuits, going to any live event, and all kinds of recreational fitness pursuits.

About Dr. Molly Moran

Bio: Hello! My name is Molly Moran, and I am a new Clinical Assistant Professor in the Counseling Department. Before joining the OSU- Cascades faculty, I completed my PhD at Boise State University and spent one year as a Visiting Assistant Professor at The College of Idaho. I am a Licensed School Counselor in Oregon and a Licensed Professional Counselor in Idaho. My teaching and research interests include social justice, advocacy, and cultural humility.


Fun Fact: I am an extreme outdoor enthusiast. When I am not in the mountains I am often daydreaming about my next outdoor adventure. I was a competitive ski racer for 15 years and still love to rip around the mountain as much as I did when I was 17.


Why I’m excited to work at CoEd/OSU: I was drawn to OSU because of its commitment to equity, inclusion, and social justice. I look forward to joining a professional community that is actively working towards creating more equitable experiences for students while also engaging in social justice work on campus and in communities.   

About Dr. Lucy Purgason

Biography: I am excited to join my colleagues in the Counseling program at OSU-Cascades as an Assistant Professor. I have worked in counselor education for eight years, including positions at Western Washington University and Appalachian State. I started my professional journey as a school counselor committed to implementing equity-driven and anti-racist school counseling programs in rural, low-income districts in mental health professional shortage areas. I’m passionate about training counseling students to utilize strengths-based, culturally sustaining approaches with students and clients. 

Fun fact/hobby about me: I love being outside enjoying nature but am often underprepared for many of my adventures. I once ran a 5k mud run barefoot (ouch!). 

Why I’m excited to work at CoEd/OSU: My research is informed by my experiences as a school counselor, working at a school specifically for newcomer immigrant and refugee students. I am deeply invested in contributing to knowledge that assists school counselors in delivering comprehensive school counseling programs inclusive of students’ cultural strengths, drawing on social justice frameworks such as Community Cultural Wealth (Yosso, 2005) and Relational-Cultural Theory. I value opportunities to collaborate with colleagues and students and look forward to partnerships through the OSU-Cascades Counseling Clinic and local schools.   

This page is a collection of archived articles, events and materials in memory of Michael J. O’Malley.

– Oregon State University College of Education

Make a gift

In lieu of flowers, please consider a gift to Mike’s scholarship fund. Gifts can be made to the OSU Foundation at osufoundation.org or mailed to OSU Foundation, 4238 SW Research Way, Corvallis, OR 97333. Please indicate that the gift is in memory of Mike O’Malley.


Event: Sept. 30, 2021 fall community gathering

A recording may be made available after the event.

Join the College of Education and the community at this fall gathering to celebrate Mike’s work and life at OSU. We hope to unveil a dedicated memorial rose bush at this time on the College of Education property.

Attendees will be supported by Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) and the Office of the Dean of Students at this event to facilitate an informal gathering space to remember, support, and share stories of Mike’s legacy.

Event details

Community Gathering recordings

Full event recording

Choir performance recording (better audio)

Mike O’Malley’s obituary

https://www.gazettetimes.com/news/local/obituaries/michael-joseph-omalley/article_a86bcfa0-d6af-5513-b425-a66afb52ef87.html

Emmett O’Malley’s blog

“Death of My Dad” – Read the blog here

(The College of Education was granted permission to share this link more publicly)

Valley Library e-book collection in memory of Mike’OMalley

Click here for book collection list.

Things Overheard at OSU post about Mike

https://www.facebook.com/groups/OSUOverheard/permalink/10159180384234000/

Funeral home photo slideshow

Visit here

Funeral Services Recording and Info

The family of Professor Mike O’Malley has asked that we share the details of the funeral services.

Services will be held Friday, July 16, at 11am at St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Corvallis, 501 NW 25 St, Corvallis, OR, 97330. All are welcome.

The passing of Mike O’Malley, a beloved faculty member, is a tremendous loss to the College and community, and we share our deepest condolences with his family and loved ones.

Susan — Susan K. Gardner, Ph.D. (she/her)
Dean of the College of Education

Dr. Martha Ahrendt | Education PhD Program Lead

Martha’s experience is rooted in philanthropy, non-profits, and community engagement, in roles such as the Vice President for Community Engagement at the Greater Green Bay Community Foundation, Executive Director of Connections for Mental Wellness, and consultant assisting non-profits and foundations. She has helped a variety of stakeholders come together and navigate through complex processes and organizational systems.  She has a doctorate in Art History from Washington University, St. Louis; a Master’s from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; and a Bachelor’s from Carleton College, Northfield, Minnesota. She loves cooking food from around the world, and is looking forward to working with everyone in the College.  

Dr. Becky Crandall | Adult & Higher Education Associate Professor of Practice

Biography: Hello! My name is Dr. Becky Crandall, and I am the new AHE Associate Professor of Practice. I have worked in college and university settings for nearly two decades, including my most recent position as a faculty member in the Higher Education and Student Affairs Program at The Ohio State University. I look forward to getting to know you all; in the meantime, feel free to learn more about me at www.beckycrandall.com. 

Fun fact/hobby about me: While I consider myself a junk food connoisseur, I am also part of the CrossFit community. I promise not to talk about it all the time though!

Why I’m excited to work at CoEd/OSU: I am Dam Proud to be part of the College and its legacy of preparing social-justice-focused change agents. I am also thrilled to finally plant my life in the state that long ago captured my heart.

Niki Weight | Head Advisor

Biography: My passion is making a difference through hearing students’ stories about who they are and where they want to go and helping them achieve their goals. This led me to earn my Bachelor of Science in Sociology from Brigham Young University and a Master of Science in Academic Advising from Kansas State University. I began advising 10 years ago as an Exploratory advisor and then moved to Oregon three years ago to serve as the Director of Student Success and Advising at Western Oregon University before joining the OSU family.

Fun fact/hobby about me: One of my favorite places in the world is the Oregon coast. I didn’t see the beach for the first time until I was in college and now I go as often as I can, even in the winters. I was definitely born in the wrong state and love my Oregon home!

Why I’m excited to work at CoEd/OSU: As someone who was born and raised in a rural community, I love the feel and values of a land grant institution like Oregon State University. The value of education and the impact it can have on a person’s future has been a core value throughout my entire career. These are some of the reasons I am so excited to join the College of Education at OSU to combine my experience as a leader and advisor to help students reach their goal of becoming an educator.

Ana Ramirez | Teaching B.S – CBEE Instructor

Biography:

Ana comes to the College with many years of experience teaching at the K12 and university level, most recently as the ELL Program Coordinator and Teacher in Sutherlin School District and as an instructor for Pacific University and Umpqua Community College. She brings expertise in linguistically and culturally sustaining pedagogy in elementary classrooms, and a commitment to diversity, equity, and inclusion in teacher education.

Fun fact/hobby about me: 

A fun fact about me is that I have hosted eight exchange students from different countries for one year over different times during the past 18 years. A hobby I have is reading and binge-watching Netflix Shows and the Hallmark Channel.

Why I’m excited to work at CoEd/OSU: ​I am really excited about working at the College of Ed at OSU because it is a realization of a lifelong dream to become a Higher Education Instructor.  , I have worked diligently throughout my career to incorporate anti-racist pedagogy into my teaching.  I understand the barriers faced by under-represented or marginalized groups of students, as well as my own experiences meeting the needs of a diverse population of students, staff, and peers. I know I would contribute to the development of a diverse and inclusive learning community at Oregon State University through my teaching, research, and service. One way I would like to continue this is by continuing to evaluate programs, curricula, and teaching strategies designed to enhance participation of under-represented students in higher education.

Recently, Oregon State University held the 39th Annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration.

At this event, President Alexander announced the creation of the President’s Commission on the Status of Black Faculty and Staff Affairs to be co-chaired by Terrance Harris, the director of the Lonnie B. Harris Black Cultural Center, and our very own, Dr. Tenisha Tevis, an Assistant Professor in Adult and Higher Education at the College of Education.

Dr. Tevis is also the 2021 recipient of the Frances Dancy Hooks Award which recognizes Oregon State students, staff or faculty who exemplify Frances Dancy Hooks’ work: building bridges across cultures, showing courage in promoting diversity, and proudly “Walking the Talk.”

This message has been approved by all governance committees within the College of Education. It aligns with the vision, mission and values of the college.

In the College of Education, our efforts toward equity are a work in progress. We acknowledge that in our history and present we have made mistakes, but we commit to engage in anti-racism work to better serve the needs of Black, Indigenous and People of Color (BIPOC) in our community. This commitment includes ongoing action, initially split into five foci, that has been integrated into our governance structure. To serve the needs of the BIPOC community, we will employ equitable student recruitment and retention practices;  examine pedagogy and update syllabi for non-bias and inclusive practices; engage in faculty/staff forums and trainings; review College research and scholarship support structures and policies, and create a welcoming environment in Furman Hall and beyond.

We as a College of Education commit to these actions by

  • Holding re-occurring “Call to Action” open sessions for faculty and staff to explore and discuss concerns and actions needed to further our efforts addressing racism.
  • Participating in DEI-focused leadership training (Leading Change for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion) by all leadership team members.
  • Requiring search advocates for every competitive hire and creating a College policy to support equitable search practices for all college hiring.
  • Examining and improving equity in student recruitment and retention practices. 
  • Reviewing course syllabi and pedagogy across programs to identify equity-focused changes.
  • Holding anti-oppressive conversations and training for faculty and staff that focus on specific identities (e.g. Black, Indigenous, Latinx, Trans, Disability, national origin, etc.).
  • Reviewing College research and scholarship support structures and policies to better support equity work, with explicit attention to serving the needs of the BIPOC community. 
  • Building structures and practices that support and highlight College research and scholarship that uncover and promote the alleviation of inequity, with explicit attention to the needs of the BIPOC community. 
  • Charging an ad hoc governance committee to explore changes to create a community and space that are welcoming for BIPOC students, faculty, and staff.

For more ideas, keep an eye out for information on our upcoming forums. Send questions, comments, concerns to coed-action@oregonstate.edu