Hi everyone! Henry Golb again, for my third and final blog post of the summer. As a brief refresher, I’m Christy Tanner’s intern working with the south Willamette Valley field crops. I am based out of Linn County, and my job is to assist Christy in both the field and the office.   

It’s hard to believe that my time with Linn County Extension is coming to an end. It’s been a remarkable experience and I’m very thankful I was able to work with this amazing group of people. I just want to thank the faculty and staff of Linn County Extension for all their support this summer. 

Blooming mint in Jefferson, Oregon. Photo by Henry Golb.
Blooming mint in Jefferson, Oregon. Photo by Henry Golb.

Over the course of my 10 weeks at the OSU Extension office in Linn County I’ve been doing ground sampling and drone flights in grass seed fields looking at vole damage, collected the data for the Willamette Valley Mint Pest Alert newsletter, and I was in charge of compiling and editing the Willamette Valley, Central, and Eastern Mint Pest Alert newsletters each week. I got to be a part of hop nutrient field research study with Christy’s north valley counterpart, Betsy Verhoeven, and so much more. A big highlight of my summer was having the opportunity to be given the tour of Reerslev Farms’ mint distillery just outside of Junction City. Seeing (and tasting) the final product of fields I worked in was pretty special. Riding around with John Reerslev and touring some his mint fields was the icing on the cake.  

All these experiences gave me a real-world taste of Willamette Valley agriculture and opened my eyes up to a world I’d only experienced through classrooms and textbooks. This internship taught me and showed me practical skills that can only be learned in the field.  

I walked into this internship not knowing much about Extension. I came in with the notion that Extension only worked with and helped farmers. While a sizeable portion of the Extension Service is focused on agriculture, I could not have been farther from the truth. I learned about and saw programs from 4-H all the way to food preservation classes. I’m walking out knowing that Extension works with and improves the quality of life for all Oregonians. I hope that more Oregonians see OSU Extension as a resource for them in their daily lives. Extension is here to serve and help the people.  

This internship could not be what it’s been without the people I’ve worked with. I want to take this opportunity to thank Christy, Betsy, and Michele Webster, who manages the Linn County office, for believing in me and guiding me along the way. I would also like to thank KJ Joseph, who coordinates the OSU Intern Program, and my family for all their support.  

A water activity at an elementary school.
A water activity at an elementary school.

Hi everyone! I’m Kelci Free, providing an update from Linn County. Over the last two months, I have learned so much more about Extension than I ever thought possible. I have quickly learned just how much time and planning goes into every event beforehand whether it be a farmers market, teaching in schools, or planning classes for the public. A few weeks ago, I was able to attend an event for women in agriculture at a small farm near Corvallis with the OSU Extension Small Farms Program. It was very inspiring to see what so many other women in agriculture were doing and get to hear their knowledge and experiences.  

 The owner of the farm showed us so many cool parts of her property and explained everything she does with her animals and garden and was able to answer lots of questions and give advice as well. It was an awesome experience to see how everyone fit into the agricultural industry and were able to come together and learn from each other. 

I am seeing the mission of Extension being met daily, by all of the programmings my supervisor does as nonformal education. We have prepared and performed nonformal education for elementary schools, farmers markets, fairs and we are planning a class for rural living basics for the general public. Everything we do as Extension faculty is to benefit our community and its people which is part of the 4 “Ps” of Extension: People, Places, Programs, and Partnerships. 

One of my biggest learning moments was while we were teaching at an elementary school in the first week and one of the activities I planned wasn’t working, so I had to adapt and change it. Being able to change plans quickly when one thing does not work out has been a common theme throughout my internship so far, and everyone says it is very needed in a career in Extension. I have quickly learned that you need to plan for the worst-case scenario and have lots of backup plans and the ability to adapt in order to be successful in this field. There have been countless learning moments in the few weeks I have had so far, I look forward to all I am yet to learn this summer. 

Hi everyone! Henry Golb again, back for my second blog post of the summer. As a quick refresher, I’m the intern for Christy Tanner, the south Willamette Valley field crops specialist for OSU Extension. I am based in the Linn County Extension office, and my job is to assist her in both the field and the office.  

Henry Golb uses a a soil probe to pull some soil samples at a local small farm.
Henry Golb uses a a soil probe to pull some soil samples at a local small farm. Photo by Christy Tanner.

The last couple of weeks have been a bit of a change of pace for me compared to the first few weeks. Lately, I’ve been spending more time at the Linn County Extension office and at the Hyslop Crop Science Field Research Lab in Corvallis (one of OSU’s many research farms). At Hyslop, I’ve been in the lab weighing and tending to grass seed samples that are a part of a vole damage study going on across the Willamette Valley. At the Linn County Extension office, I’ve been working on an article that is to be sent out in GROWING, a publication that goes every other month via the Albany Democrat Herald newspaper, and other projects. 

Despite being in the office more, I still get to go out and interact with the good people of Oregon. Recently I spent a day at the Linn County Fair, where I really got to see Extension shine. Michele Webster, who manages the Linn County office, wanted me to go to the fair and learn more about the 4-H program because before I walked onto the fairgrounds, I knew very little about the 4-H program. I was fortunate enough to have Linn County’s 4-H program coordinator, Abby Johnson, give me the rundown and show me around the fair. By the end of our walk, my mind was blown. I had no idea how big or impactful 4-H is. Learning about what 4-H does and how it positively affects the kids was great, but then actually seeing the kids smile with their hog, lamb, sewing project, etc. was magical. I was so impressed I came back to the fair on my day off just to watch the livestock auctions.  

 All in all, I’m enjoying and finding meaning in my work this summer. Life is good.  

My name is Kelci Free, and I am from Scio, Oregon. This fall I will be a senior at OSU studying agricultural sciences with a plan to start the agriculture education master’s program the following year, and to eventually be an Extension agent. When I am not busy in school I enjoy hiking, enjoying the beauty of Oregon and spending time with my friends and family. 

I am an intern this summer in the OSU Extension office in Linn County, working under the supervision of Chrissy Lucas, Extension’s groundwater quality education and outreach program coordinator for Linn, Benton, Marion, Polk and Jackson counties. I will be doing a lot of work in groundwater management by setting up nitrate testing and trying to help those at risk learn about the contaminants in their water. 

Before starting my internship, I had a brief understanding of what Extension is besides being at county fairs and answering questions about gardening. Then I took an “Introduction to Extension” class at OSU, in which I learned that there were many branches to Extension. There is still so much I am eager to learn!  

Since I started my internship, I have been able to learn so much more about Extension and had new experiences doing all kinds of program prep, outreach, and what goes into being an Extension agent. 

Hi everyone! My name is Henry Golb, and I am a senior at OSU in the College of Agricultural Sciences, studying soil sciences and agricultural communications. Growing up in Camas, Washington, I took a nontraditional path to the agricultural world. 

My family doesn’t farm, and I didn’t participate in 4-H or FFA in high school. But agricultural influences were always around me. I heard my grandfather’s stories from when he was a nurseryman outside of Clackamas, Oregon. And my father is a natural resources water consultant. I grew up listening to him on the phone working with his clients. What I heard growing up, my desire to work outside, and a local farmer taking a chance on a high school senior led me to where I am today. 

Where am I today? I’m the intern for Christy Tanner, the south Willamette Valley field crops specialist for OSU Extension. I am based in the Linn County Extension office, and my job is to assist her in both the field and the office. Each day is different for me; one day I might be changing pheromone traps and sweeping mint fields for pests, and the next I might be walking and sampling a vole-damaged perennial ryegrass field. I love the unique challenges that each day brings. 

Before this internship I knew very little about Extension. All I knew was that Extension helps people, and that was something I wanted to be a part of. Even then, I wanted to improve the quality of life for farmers, ranchers, and the people of Oregon. This summer I am so grateful to be doing just that. It is a privilege to go to work each day knowing my sweat is making a difference. 

Prior to working for Extension, I worked for Shady Grove Farm, a small vegetable farm in Camas for the past two summers. At Shady Grove Farm, I had a hand in every step, all the way from seeding to selling our products at the weekly Camas Farmers Market. I am hopeful that I will be able to use my experiences and knowledge gained at Shady Grove Farm, OSU Extension, and my classes over the past three years to go into the private sector and land a job working in agricultural sales.  

Outside of work you can find me spending time with friends and family, or out on the water fishing. As the president of the Oregon State Bass Fishing Team, I spend lots of time both on the water and helping other people get on the water. My top three favorite fish to target would be Smallmouth Bass, Chinook salmon, and Coho salmon. Aside from the fishing itself I love driving and boating around Oregon and seeing the natural beauty our state has to offer. 

I want to take this opportunity to thank Christy and Michele Webster, who manages the Linn County office, for believing in me. I would also like to thank KJ Joseph, who coordinates the OSU Intern Program, and my family for all their support. 

 

Hello everyone!  

My name is Alli Studnick, I am 22 years old, and from the small town of Scio, Oregon, where I live on my family’s 400-acre cattle ranch. Our ranch started in 1944, and I am a fourth-generation cattle rancher. We run about 200 head of cattle and we also raise pigs. I have “3½” horses – when you count my Shetland pony. We also have a goat, four dogs and lots of cats. 

While I am not helping my family on the farm, my hobbies include riding and competing in speed events with my horses Dalton Dixie and Romeo. In July of 2019, I was working at a farm stand and a woman walked in with a dog and asked me if I wanted her. She had found her on the side of a road and couldn’t keep her. So, I took her home, and the rest is history! Ivy is a 2-year-old Australian shepherd and she’s my best friend, we do almost everything together. She loves adventure. She rides horses, four-wheelers, riding lawn mowers, tractors, mopeds, and does everything in between. She’s such a fun dog and I am so lucky to have her.  

This June I graduated from Oregon State University with a degree in agricultural science and minors in crop and animal science. This fall I am headed to the agricultural education master’s program here at OSU to become an extension agent!

When I was younger, I was in 4-H and FFA in Linn County. I showed horses and sold pigs to pay for my horse obsession. I knew that the OSU Extension Service helped put on the fair, but I really didn’t know much more than that. When I was a junior at OSU, I enrolled in a class titled “Intro to Extension and Engagement.” During this course we learned about different programs of OSU Extension and met some of the agents in each program. After the class ended, I was hooked and knew that I wanted to pursue Extension as my career. 

Most of my life has been spent in the agriculture industry, and I’ve just been so inspired by farmers, ranchers, Extension agents for their love and passion of making the world a better place. This is why I decided to pursue a career in Extension, specifically in the agriculture field. Interacting with my community and listening to their stories, challenges, or successes in their farms and ranches makes me motivated to lend a helping hand in whatever needs they might have. Overall, I want to make a difference in every person’s life I may cross, which is why Extension is the perfect path for me!  

This summer I will be an intern with Chrissy Lucas, who is the Extension groundwater quality outreach program coordinator in the Willamette Valley. I am really excited for this opportunity to learn more about this part of Extension, and to meet the different people in the communities of Polk, Linn, Benton and Marion counties!