Micah Schmidt recently got hired as a Regional Fire Specialist, based in the Union county Extension office. Micah graduated from the College of Forestry in March 2023 with a Master of Science in Sustainable Forest Management with a focus in Fire, Silviculture, and Forest Health.

Does one class, teacher or experience really stand out?
One class that really stands out for me was the Prescribed Fire Practicum taught by John Punches, Daniel Leavell, John Rizza, and Jacob Putney. The course had a two-week field session in La Grande and is one of the reasons that I moved here after I graduated. All of those professors were great to learn from, but I will single out John Punches as particularly important in my education. I now work in the same office as him. He is really a stand-out guy that I know will be an excellent resource during my career with Extension. I would also mention Dave Shaw, James Johnston, Andrew Merschel, Eric Forsman, and Jimmy Swingle as people who I learned a ton from during my time at OSU.

How did COF prepare you for your career?
COF definitely helped me build skills to be successful in my career, but I feel like my time working with Marty Main at his consulting forestry company Small Woodland Services, Inc. in southwest Oregon really prepared me the most. Marty was a great mentor to me and gave me an excellent education in forestry for several years before I went on to get my Master’s degree. That experience showed me how beneficial having an experienced mentor to work with day in and day out is for someone trying to break into a natural resources field. I’m hoping I can engage with young people hoping to get into this line of work so that I can potentially have that impact on others.

What are your main duties as a Regional Fire Specialist?
I’m still getting settled into my position and figuring that out myself. I think the most important part of my job is assessing the fire-related needs of the communities in the region I work in and figuring out how to best respond in an effective manner. I’m hoping to utilize my technical skills to assist local partners and stakeholders with their projects, communicate fire science to communities in my region in an accessible way, and help to build and maintain cross-boundary land management partnerships since we all can acknowledge that wildfire does not recognize property boundaries. I’m particularly looking forward to returning good fire on the land through prescribed burning. There’s a ton of interest in that in northeast Oregon, and I hope to help promote it as much as possible. But depending on the needs of the region, my job could look very different year-to-year.

What is your favorite tree?
Until I moved to northeast Oregon, my favorite tree was sugar pine. I still have a great admiration for that tree, but western larch is quickly looking to unseat it as my favorite since sugar pine doesn’t occur in my region. Honorable mentions would include Pacific yew and California black oak.

Anything else you would like to share?
I just feel very fortunate to have the opportunity to fill this position. I interacted with my predecessor, John Rizza, and admired the way he went about things in this role. I’m also lucky to work in the Union County Extension office which is full of great people. I have a lot of support from the northeast Oregon extension foresters and an awesome fire team to work with and learn from. I’ll also give a shout-out to my supervisor EJ Davis, who has been nothing short of fantastic in how she has welcomed me into this position.

At Oregon State University College of Forestry, students, faculty and staff work collaboratively with alumni, donors and partners toward a shared desire to improve life for all. Whether it’s developing innovative approaches to forest management, creating new wood products, preserving the health and vitality of ecosystems or expanding and supporting local economies, the college is strengthened by this collective approach.

At this year’s Dean’s Dinner on May 24, the college community honored current students and alumni who are making a difference in our changing world. This year’s outstanding alumni are leading the charge to ensure healthy forests, gender equality, and robust and resilient economies. Learn more about their legacies and join the college in celebrating their accomplishments:

Jessica Leahy, Ph.D.
‘99, B.S. Forest Recreation Resources
‘01, M.S. Forest Resources

An advocate for women in forestry, Leahy was the second woman tenured in the University of Maine School of Forest Resources and first to achieve the rank of full professor. She was a founding member of SWIFT, a UMaine group supporting women and gender minorities in forestry programs, and was an advisory council member for the inaugural 2022 Women’s Forest Congress. She recently served as the associate dean for the College of Natural Sciences, Forestry and Agriculture and associate director of the Maine Agricultural and Forest Experiment Station at UMaine.

 

 

Camille Chow-Moyers
‘14, B.S. Renewable Materials and
Interior Design

After graduation, Chow-Moyers went on to work for Roseburg Forest Products in quality assurance and sales, before a 6-year stint working as a program manager of international compliance and auditing for Benchmark International (Eugene, OR and Shanghai, China). Today, she is co-owner of MCM Global, LLC (Portland, OR and Yorkshire, England), a consulting and auditing firm that specializes in international forestry compliance and quality management systems.

 

 

 

Suzanne Simard, Ph.D.
‘89, M.S. Forest Science
‘95, Ph.D.

Simard is a professor of forest ecology at the University of British Columbia and the author of the book, “Finding the Mother Tree.” She is known for her work on how trees interact and communicate using below-ground fungal networks. Her work has influenced filmmakers and her TED talks have been viewed by more than 10 million people worldwide. She has published over 200 peer-reviewed articles, presented at conferences around the world and in 2023 she received the Kew International Medal.

 

 

 

During the dinner at CH2M Hill Alumni Center, the College of Forestry graduate scholarship committee recognized our top incoming and returning graduate students with College of Forestry fellowships. The committee selected 28 students, both Master- and Ph.D.-level, to receive college fellowships totaling just over $150,000 for the 2023-2024 academic year. Scholarships range in value from $3,000 to $8,000.

Pictured L to R: Victoria Diedrichs, M.S. Wood Science & Engineering; Katie Wampler, Ph.D. Water Resources Science, Forest Engineering, Resources and Management; Mark Kerstens, Ph.D. Forest Engineering, Resources and Management; Kira Minehart, Ph.D. Recreation Ecology, Forest Ecosystems and Society; Dean Tom DeLuca; Jacob Atkins, M.S. Wood Science & Engineering; David Hamilton, Ph.D. Forest Engineering, Resources and Management.

A version of this story appeared in the Fall 2023 issue of Focus on Forestry, the alumni magazine of the Oregon State University College of Forestry.

Dr. George Brown, the former dean of the College of Forestry, passed away peacefully on June 9 surrounded by his family.

George arrived at Oregon State University in 1964 as a Ph.D. graduate student studying forest hydrology and began his College of Forestry teaching and research career in 1966. In 1973, he was appointed head of the Forest Engineering Department and in 1986 he became Associate Dean for Research. In total, he was a faculty member or administrator at Oregon State University for 32 years, retiring in 1999 as Dean of the College of Forestry, a position he held for 10 years.

As Dean, George encouraged the kind of systems-based, collaborative and inter-disciplinary research the college continues today. He pushed faculty members to work across organizational and institutional boundaries and transformed the Oregon State College of Forestry into the leading recipient of grants and contracts among the nation’s forestry schools before his retirement. George was also actively involved in the Corvallis community, volunteering and fundraising for community service organizations including Community Outreach and the Boys and Girls Club. After retirement from the college, George stayed in regular contact with many in the community. The logging sports arena in the Peavy Arboretum is proudly named after him.

George Brown left an amazing legacy at the College of Forestry. The work and research we pursue on a daily basis is built on those who came before us, and George’s 32 years of incredible contributions are of immeasurable value.

George is survived by his wife Joan, daughters Christen Maier, Annie Brown Kurowski, son in law, Brad Maier, three grandchildren, sister Sally Presson, nieces Kim Blaes, Amy Presson and nephews Don and Matt Presson.

A celebration of life is scheduled for July 21st at 10 a.m. at the First United Methodist Church and is open to the public. The college will also hold a celebration of life for George in the fall.

The family suggests that memorials may be made to the Dean’s Fund for Excellence & Innovation in the College of Forestry or the George W Brown Scholarship Endowment through the Oregon State University Foundation. Donations also can be made online at fororegonstate.org. Please note “in memory of George W Brown” on the memo line or in the online giving form. The family also suggests memorials may be made to Community Outreach or the Corvallis First United Methodist Church Foundation.

Major & specialization area:
Forestry with options in Forest Management & Forest Restoration and Fire

Why did you choose your degree program/major?
When I committed to going to OSU, I knew I wanted to pursue a degree that would lead to a job working outdoors and when I discovered that OSU’s Forestry program happened to be the #1 in the country, it was an easy decision to make. I knew I could always transfer to a different degree if I didn’t like it, but I’ve never second-guessed my original choice.

What’s the best experience you’ve had as a student?
Field School was by far the most transformative and fun experience I had at college. I met so many cool people and spent two weeks outside learning real, tangible forestry skills both in the Willamette Valley and in Sisters, OR.

Have you participated in any experiential learning opportunities? How has this impacted your student experience?
In my Junior year, I went on a Spring break trip to the Patagonian region of Chile. I got scholarships from the College of Forestry that helped make it possible, and a lot of support/encouragement from faculty and professors. It was my first time going abroad and it was pretty transformative for me, both in terms of my education on forestry topics and learning about the culture and history of the area. The professor, Carlos Gonzalez-Benecke, his graduate student, Claudio Guevara, and many others put a lot of effort and thoughtfulness into organizing the trip which made it an incredible experience.

What are your plans after graduation?
For the next couple of years, I’m planning to alternate between seasonal field work jobs and traveling now that I’m done with school. Eventually, I hope to find a forestry company back in the PNW where I can start working at and continue learning.

What’s one thing that you would like incoming OSU students to know?
Keep your mind open because there are so many more paths you can take than the ones you know of. Also, don’t hesitate to reach out to the professors/faculty in your college if you have an idea or goal you want to pursue; they are more than happy to help.

Have you received any scholarships from OSU or the College of Forestry? If so, what has it helped you accomplish?
I received several scholarships from OSU and the College of Forestry over my four years here that have made a huge difference for me financially. While I still had to work while being a student, it definitely reduced the burden of tuition, made my trip to Chile possible, and also allowed me to take several extra PAC classes such as Bush Craft, swimming, and dance classes for fun.

What are your go-to snacks?
I’ve always been a big fan of the West Dining Hall sandwiches-especially because of how close to Peavy they are.

Major & specialization area
Tourism Recreation Adventure Leadership with a concentration in Recreation Management

Why did you choose your degree program/major?
I chose my degree program because I love being outside in nature hiking and learning about ecosystem interactions that make a place so special and worth protecting. My goal is to be able to inspire other people to love parks as much as I do. There is much that goes into planning and maintaining a recreation destination and many variables to consider such as user experience and impacts to the environment that should be carefully monitored. Ultimately, I would like to take this awareness and combine it with an environmental education perspective to become a coordinator for interpretive programs.

What’s the best experience you’ve had as a student?
I have really enjoyed the opportunity to represent the CoF as an Ambassador by leading tours for future students, building community, hosting events, and sharing about the program. My favorite course was TRAL 456, a capstone class that pulled many concepts together in a group setting to create and design an outdoor recreation plan with consideration to public and private lands. This class was taught by my favorite professor and mentor, Ashley D’Antonio. What makes her exceptional is that she is understanding and approachable to students, while being dedicated to student support and growth at OSU. Ashley has a wealth of knowledge that she is willing to share with students concerning recreation ecology and she is well connected within the National Parks system because of her research and hard work that speaks for itself.

Have you participated in any experiential learning opportunities? How has this impacted your student experience?
The experiential learning opportunities I have participated in include an internship at the Middle Fork Willamette Watershed Council where I was able to help create outdoor school curriculum and shadow the Youth Education Coordinator. I have also become more well-rounded through volunteering for local organizations such as Corvallis Parks and Rec to do trail maintenance or the Sustainability Coalition to do wetland restoration work at Bald Peak. Finally, I have been fortunate to be able to participate in the faculty-led trip to Vancouver Island, British Columbia for spring break 2022 where we learned about their forest management practices and how that relates to salmon in comparison to Oregon’s own system. All of these experiences have informed my education decisions and how I approach new opportunities for growth and development.

What are your plans after graduation?
After graduation, I plan to take some time off to be with my 9 month old daughter and co-owning a store with my business partner and friend. Then I plan to resume my studies by enrolling in the Natural Resources graduate program. In the meantime, I am looking forward to a slower pace while keeping up with professional organizations and volunteer opportunities.

What’s one thing (or piece of advice) that you would like incoming OSU students to know?
A piece of advice that I would like incoming OSU students to know is that your life and experience will be much richer if you immerse yourself into what OSU has to offer. This means joining clubs, volunteering for fun events, becoming a part of the Leadership Academy to grow yourself professionally and make new friends, and finally utilizing all your resources on campus to help support you as a student. For me that meant the Family Resource Center and the Food Pantry in the College of Forestry. Lastly, for an unforgettable experience you will not regret, I would highly recommend studying abroad and applying for as many scholarships as possible to help with the funding.

Have you received any scholarships from OSU or the College of Forestry?
I have received two generous scholarships from the College of Forestry. One has enabled me to take advantage of the International Programs opportunity to study abroad in Canada during spring break 2022. The other CoF scholarship has allowed me to attend my classes knowing that my education expenses are covered so that I could fully concentrate on the effort required for my education.

What are your go-to snacks?
My essential go-to snacks for hiking and being outside include trail mix (minus the raisins), peanut butter pretzels, any fresh fruit, cheese, and jerky.

Anything else would you like to share?
The only other thing I would share is that I am extremely grateful for my experiences at OSU that have made me who I am today. Going forward, my goal is to continuously learn while staying humble, and I look forward to giving back to the CoF by helping future students.

Major & specialization area:
I’m a Natural Resource Policy & Management and Sustainability double-major, also working through the Honors program.

Why did you choose your degree program/major?
I chose the major pathway relatively late in my college career – I was undeclared until most of the way through my sophomore year. I knew I wanted to work outdoors, and I’ve always felt passionately that the natural world needs wise stewards. Both the Natural Resources pathway and the Sustainability program allowed me to integrate knowledge from numerous fields, and I felt that this would provide the best holistic forestry education for me.

Have you participated in any experiential learning opportunities? How has this impacted your student experience?
I’m not sure if this meets the definition of an experiential learning opportunity, but I did perform an internship as a part of my Sustainability degree. I worked with the North Coast Land Conservancy over the summer of 2022, performing an invasive species survey using GIS mapping. This involved traversing the mountains I’d grown up hiking through, and gave me experience in tangibly caring for the land – this is a concept that has stuck with me as a guiding desire in my college career. I want to be able to bring about real, positive change in the landscapes I care about, and doing work with the NCLC has shown me a pathway to accomplish that.

What are your plans after graduation?
I plan to go to graduate school – either here at OSU working with concepts of Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK), or at the University of Edinburgh, studying rewilding in heavily managed forests. I then hope to return to my home area and act as a steward to the land in some capacity.

What’s one thing (or piece of advice) that you would like incoming OSU students to know?
I say to take time out to walk somewhere natural, when you have time. Making time too is key – opportunities seldom present themselves, unless you create them (which you can do, easily, I promise).

Have you received any scholarships from OSU or the College of Forestry? If so, what has it helped you accomplish?
Receiving the OSU Presidential Scholarship has allowed me to focus entirely on my academic career, which is a gift I am profoundly grateful for. I wouldn’t have been able to pursue my Sustainability degree without it, or have the experience of writing a thesis through the Honors College, if I simultaneously was employed elsewhere. The scholarship offers a lot to Oregonian students, and it is an honor to receive.

What are your go-to snacks?
I usually go for cheese. Nutty cheeses, herbaceous cheeses, full-bodied mozzarella and the sharpest cheddars; I went to high school in Tillamook county so cheese runs through my veins.

Sydney in New Zealand with keas, a bird unique to the area

Major & specialization area: Forest Engineering

Why did you choose your degree program/major?
My junior year of high school, I interned for the Bureau of Land Management’s Walter Horning Tree and Seed Orchard. Being on the growing/reforestation side gave me a unique perspective of the forest industry, and I wanted to learn more. I found OSU’s Forest Engineering (FE) program at the College of Forestry (CoF), and the rest was history.

What’s the best experience you’ve had as a student?
My favorite experience was definitely field school. Here, I made connections that would be fostered throughout my time here at OSU, creating a tight-knit community that I have enjoyed growing and learning with. Not to mention, swimming at the lake was a fun way to wrap up a summer.

Have you participated in any experiential learning opportunities? How has this impacted your student experience?
I have had the opportunity and blessing to participate in two study abroad experiences and several internships throughout the course of my program. My study abroad experiences include a semester at the Université Laval in Québec, Canada and a semester at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand. These allowed me to learn some global perspectives to forestry while exploring a new and unique country. A couple highlights of my internships include working on the FE crew at the OSU Research Forests and working on a riparian monitoring research project with OSU faculty and graduate students (through the CoF Mentored Employment Program). These internships gave me helpful hands-on experience in forestry, as well as let me explore different avenues to applying an FE degree.

What are your plans after graduation?
I will be working as a Forest Engineer at Lone Rock Timber Management in Roseburg, OR.

What’s one thing (or piece of advice) that you would like incoming OSU students to know?
Look at the OSU Jobs catalog and mentorship programs for job opportunities! It is a great opportunity to learn and get experience in your field all while making money to fund your education. Even talking to professors– many of which also work on research– can lead to job opportunities. Through the OSU Jobs catalog, I found a student position at the U.S. Forest Service PNW Research Station (across the parking lot from Richardson Hall), which allowed me to get forestry/research experience my freshman year within a 5 minute walk from my dorm. The best way to learn is by getting your hands dirty!

Have you received any scholarships from OSU or the College of Forestry? If so, what has it helped you accomplish?
The Dorothy D. Hoener Memorial Scholarship helped me continue my FE degree program here at OSU. My education is completely self-funded so generous scholarships such as this are what make it all possible. Additionally, OSU and the CoF were able to support me in applying for the Gilman Scholarship Program. This scholarship program was vital to my study abroad at the Université Laval in Québec, Canada, where I took courses in French that counted towards my Forest Engineering degree.

What are your go-to snacks?
I’m not sure if this counts as a snack, but my go-to is definitely sparkling water. I’m always cracking cans of that stuff in class.

Major & specialization area:
Natural Resources, Conservation Law Enforcement

Why did you choose your degree program/major?
After taking an environmental science course and volunteering at the San Diego Zoo in high school, I looked into Oregon State to pursue my interests in conservation and environmental education. Once I got here, I learned about the field of natural resources, and discovered that the College of Forestry offered a specialization in conservation law enforcement. I’d always had an interest in the law enforcement field, so that was really intriguing to me. I had assumed that I’d have to get an environmental science degree, and then figure out how to get into law enforcement from there, and I never realized that I could learn about all of those things in one degree. Although I kind of stumbled into it, my degree and my work experience have helped me realize my passions for outdoor recreation management, environmental interpretation, and conservation, as well as my goal to support opportunities for people to learn and safely recreate together in the outdoors.

What’s the best experience you’ve had as a student?
I’ve been able to take some amazing courses and do some things that I’d never imagined I would do in a class, like spend hours every week birdwatching (Field Sampling of Fish and Wildlife), complete an investigation into illegal hunting, from crime scene to final report (Fish and Wildlife Law Enforcement), dye my hair for a research project (Nonverbal Communication), and draft new policies (Law, Crime, and Policy). I’ve truly enjoyed so many of my classes at OSU, but those are some of my favorite memories.

Have you participated in any experiential learning opportunities? How has this impacted your student experience?
I’ve had the opportunity to participate in a few different seasonal jobs and internships during my time at OSU, but these are my most recent and my favorites. The summer before my senior year, I worked as a park guide at the Missouri National Recreational River in South Dakota. Working for the National Park Service was such an exciting and incredible experience. I got to learn a lot of new skills, and had a lot of amazing adventures on my own while I was there and as I drove home at the end of the summer. Additionally, during my final term, I completed a Birds of Prey Internship with the Chintimini Wildlife Center. The internship was so much fun because I was able to continue developing my skills in environmental interpretation while learning about animal care, which was completely new to me. I love raptors and birds of prey, and now I have pictures of myself with an owl on my arm, which feels like the pinnacle of my college career and life. These experiences allowed me to build on skills and knowledge that I learned in class, and challenged me to develop professional skills that I can take with me into new experiences.

What’s one thing (or piece of advice) that you would like incoming OSU students to know?
You’re going to do great! Personally, I struggled a lot with comparison and feeling like I always needed to compete with my peers. But we all have unique experiences, interests, and skills – including you! You are absolutely smart enough and capable enough, and you have things that only you can bring – so bring it. Keep trying, keep looking for new ways to do things, and relentlessly pursue what brings you joy and what fulfills you as a person. Don’t be anyone else, be you. Also, get off campus once in a while! Volunteering on trail building days in the research forest and at the Grace Center for Adult Day Services kept me sane and helped me gain some perspective.

What are your go-to snacks?
I really love hummus and will eat it with anything. Dried mango with chili, Sour Patch Kids, and pretty much anything from Trader Joe’s are always solid snacks as well.

Anything else would you like to share?
You’re going to learn so much and grow in ways that you can’t imagine. Try to stay present for all of it, and reach out for help if you need it. I’ve taken advantage of a lot of resources at OSU, and the knowledge I have gained from those experiences is that there are so many people here who want you to be safe, well, and successful. Also, speaking as someone from southern California, never miss an opportunity to go outside and photosynthesize when it’s sunny. And light therapy lamps do work, so take advantage of those as well.

Major & specialization area:
I will wrap up my undergraduate career with a degree in Natural Resources (Honors Bachelor of Science) and a specialization in Marine and Freshwater Conservation. I designed this Marine and Freshwater Conservation specialization because of my interests in wetland, stream, and coastal ecosystems. The College of Forestry approved this ISO design, and since then, I have taken a diverse array of courses–learning how to solve complex coastal resource problems from protected area conservation planning to near-water forest ecosystem dynamics. In addition to the Natural Resources degree, I selected a minor in Sustainability, where I focused on sustainable development and nature-based solutions that urban centers might use to conserve critical freshwater resources for biodiversity retention.

Why did you choose your degree program/major?
After meeting with Beth Thompson and Nicole Kent at a College of Forestry open house in 2019, I signed my major declaration form with imperishable intent. Beth and Nicole met me with such open arms and kindness, and after their sharp introductions to the Natural Resources major, I knew what to do. I chose this major because I wanted to effectuate socio-political change within the disciplines of environmental management, coastal ecology, and sustainable development, especially throughout federally-governed natural areas. The College of Forestry works at the nexus of controversiality, as humans have deep interests and attachments to natural resources, which unearth a lot of animosities. Approaching environmental antagonism with open-mindedness sums up my College of Forestry experience, and each member of this interdisciplinary network has invested themselves in some position, where they undoubtedly pioneer new ways to address problems.

What’s the best experience you’ve had as a student?
I took two courses that transformed the lens that I look through regarding land and seascape management. Dr. Ashley D’Antonio’s installment of TRAL 357 (Parks and Protected Area Management) repeatedly blew my mind, as she lectured on conservation philosophies, recreation management considerations in National Parks and Wildlife Refuges, and how to address global-scale disturbances such as elevated temperatures. When you choose to take a course with Dr. D’Antonio, you will take another, and that may not make sense now, but it will after your day-one lecture. Dr. Holly Campbell teaches a series of Honors College, Public Policy, and Fisheries and Wildlife courses, most of which rely on a cardinal thesis: contemporary strategies of sustainable development. Ocean Law (FW 422) taught me how to classify and analyze tempestuous marine issues, such as clean energy harvesting, marine mammal population health, non-point chemical pollution, and mitigating sea-level rise via robust policies. Taking a course with Dr. Campbell will open your eyes to a suite of coastal and marine-related natural and energy resource issues, all of which eventually influence community livability and social capital.

What’s one thing (or piece of advice) that you would like incoming OSU students to know?
One salient piece of advice I would give to incoming Oregon State University students is to keep an open heart when it comes to academic clubs, research opportunities, and friendships. I came into the College of Forestry and Honors College with an open mind and heart, and I did not invest myself in one focal discipline, pathway, or social circle. Instead, I walked through every door with an open perspective, which allowed me to connect to multiple disciplines, friend groups, research appointments, and faculty members. Although it feels trite to say, I suggest getting involved with as much as possible at the beginning of your undergraduate career, then gradually paring down your list of appointments and activities. Enjoy OSU, these years will lead to a lot of joyousness!

What are your plans after graduation?
I will attend Yale University this Fall! I am excited to experience Southern New England, specifically New Haven, which sits on the Long Island Sound, a beautiful estuary. As an environmental management graduate student with an emphasis on urban coastal disturbance ecology, I will continue to learn about how humans, environments, and species relationships shape and structure ecosystem persistence. I plan to research coastal ecosystem disturbances, specifically in marshes, and beaches–in relation to socio-ecological systems. Using some of the research themes that I worked with in Ashley D’Antonio’s lab, revolving around recreation ecology, human disturbances, and species composition, I designed two new studies to deploy on the Southern Connecticut coastline. To the Atlantic coast, I come!

Major:
Natural Resources with an option in Policy and Management, minor in Soil Science

Why did you choose your degree program/major? 
I have been immersed in the outdoors since I was a child, and growing up in a timber town I had a vested interest in environmental policy and management decisions with a special interest in forestry. I chose to pursue Natural Resources over Forestry because I sought more knowledge in a multidisciplinary education after I volunteered for the South Santiam Watershed Council and discovered a passion for watershed management.

What’s the best experience you’ve had as a student?
My favorite professor is Dr. Vernita Ediger from the department of Forest Ecosystems & Society in the College of Forestry. Her career experience has enhanced my understanding of course material, and she has generously provided career assistance and additional opportunities.

Have you participated in any experiential learning opportunities? How has this impacted your student experience?
I have worked at the OSU Research Forest for the last two years under Forest Manager Brent Klumph as a forestry technician. This student position has provided me with invaluable knowledge and work experience that has given me many opportunities following graduation.

What are your plans after graduation?
I will be working for the South Fork John Day Watershed Council as a Watershed Technician over the summer. After this summer, I will be serving in the Coast Guard.

What’s one thing (or piece of advice) that you would like incoming OSU students to know?
I advise students to get a planner and write everything down you need to do and to hold a consistent schedule. If you think you will remember it, you won’t.

Have you received any scholarships from OSU or the College of Forestry? If so, what has it helped you accomplish?
I have received a multitude of scholarships from OSU and the College of Forestry. I have a very small student loan, and I have worked throughout the duration of college to pay whatever scholarships did not cover. Earning scholarships has allowed me to be nearly debt-free following college and has allowed me to have flexibility in my work hours so that I could focus on my education. I am very grateful to have received these scholarships, particularly the Larry Hoffman Scholarship and Crahane Scholarship.

What are your go-to snacks?
Motts fruit snacks, apples (Koru), dried mango from Costco, and chewy granola bars from Costco.

Anything else would you like to share?
I think it is important to push yourself in college, to find new people, to experience new things, to work hard, and to find what you are truly interested in to develop into a complete person. I wish I would have done more in my first few years of college, and over my junior and senior years I have found a good group of friends I can count on, I am confident in my life trajectory, and I have developed professional relationships with industry leaders and OSU faculty. Beginning early opens so many more doors and gives students choices both during their time in an undergraduate program and afterward.