It’s official: American Promise director Michèle Stephenson is coming to OSU next month.  Our College of Education CLD group is organizing and hosting her visit with the generous support of several campus partners.

  • On Monday, April 14, we will show the short 30 minute version of the film and host a panel discussion about the Black male experience in predominately White schools. This will take place in the Corvallis High School Theater, starting at 4 PM.
  • On Tuesday, April 15, we will show the longer 80 minute version of the film, followed by a talk with director Michèle Stephenson.  This will start at 7 PM in Milam Auditorium.

American Promise poster with sponsors

American Promise follows two boys, one of which is Michèle’s son Idris, from kindergarten through high school graduation.  It centers on their experiences as two of just a few African-Americans at the prestigious Dalton School.  It speaks to the unique experience of African-American boys in schools, to visibly standing out as an ‘only’ at school, to parenting styles/concerns, to issues of social class, etc.

View the official American Promise film trailer below.

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yfA939LmPbU]

DeltaKappaGamma

Delta Kappa Gamma is an international organization of women educators who promote professional and personal growth of educators and excellence in education.

This scholarship opportunity is available to students graduating in Spring or Summer 2014. It is designed for teachers to get them started with classroom supplies. Deadline is April 21, 2014.

Download this PDF for more information and for the application.

 

michael-giamellaro-006-web
Michael Giamellaro

Michael Giallermo, Assistant Professor of Science and Math Education at the OSU Cascades campus, garnered mention in the Bend Bulletin last week in an article about Oregon’s new science curriculum.

Giallermo was one of three educators involved in Oregon’s adoption earlier this month of the Next Generation Science Standards, a K-12 science curriculum adopted by nine other states.

“The standards represent a move away from just a list of facts students need to master before graduation,” Giamellaro said this week. “The vision is that as students move up, they are not just progressing from topic to topic, but seeing connections across core ideas. Standards are also tied to performance expectations, where knowledge and skills are applied.”

Oregon last adopted a new set of science standards in 2009. While those standards began to incorporate more engineering content, the Next Generation Science Standards, adopted March 6, push that even further. However, Giamellaro said the challenge isn’t over what to include, but what to leave out, given how much could be included in a science curriculum.

“In past national efforts on standards, by the time everything that should be there is in, it’s an overwhelming collection of ideas that’s impossible to get to,” Giamellaro said. “Our big focus is on getting to the most important things people will need in a future, as we interact with technology and engineering more.”

The next challenge is deciding how to implement the standards and bring teachers up to speed on the state’s new expectations for science education.

The adoption of the Next Generation Science Standards coincides with the adoption of the Common Core State Standards, a set of math and English education goals Oregon and most other states will implement in the 2014-15 school year. The Common Core is intended to emphasize critical thinking and has been characterized as more rigorous than current Oregon standards by the state Education Department.

FCLCollage2Oregon State University is excited to announce the next courses in our online professional certificate in Free-Choice Learning for science and informal educators.

Designing Learning Environments: Physical dimensions of free-choice learning Online | 30 hours, $540
Learning is influenced by the interaction of variables within three contexts — personal, socio-cultural and physical. This course focuses on how macro-scale environmental factors, like space, crowding and novelty, and micro-scale environmental factors, like design elements, real objects and different media, support free-choice learning. Begins April 1.

Developing Effective Evaluations Online | 15 hours, $390
The course provides a hands-on approach to effectively assessing/evaluating learning and behavior within the free-choice learning contexts such as museums, national parks, zoos, aquariums and broadcast media. The design and implementation of an evaluation is used as a lens for understanding the hows and whys of assessment and evaluation. This course is designed to help professionals design their own evaluation/assessment research as well as become informed consumers of others’ research. Begins April 1.

Program Highlights
· No prerequisites, instructor-led, research based
· Peer interaction with professionals across free-choice learning contexts
· Completely online program offers flexible scheduling
· Take one class, or enroll in an entire certificate program and receive a discount

Group Discounts available! Go to:

https://pace.oregonstate.edu/catalog/free-choice-learning-professional-certificate#program-outline-section

NOSSlogoThe Northwest Regional Educational Service District’s Outdoor Science School (NOSS) program operates in the fall and spring of each academic year to provide outdoor education to attending 6th grade students at residential, overnight camps in the Willamette Valley and along the Oregon coast. To provide this opportunity to our students, we bring on high school and college-aged counselors to volunteer for a week in Spring or Fall, assisting in the education and engagement of our 6th graders.

In return for the volunteered time and efforts of the counselors, NOSS can offer up to 90 service hours, two Educational credits through Portland Community College, and hands-on experience working with youth in an outdoor educational environment.

NOSS Spring Poster

To learn more:
* NOSS Website
Description of Outdoor Science School
Program Brochure

We would like to extend a special thank you to the generous business owners who donated gift certificates to the College of Education- OSU Food Drive Raffle this year!  Additionally, we appreciate the support of the employees of Trimble Navigation for their donations of food items.  Although the final totals are still being calculated, our college food drive raised an equivalent of 2,754 pounds of food during the month of February with the help of our faculty, staff, students, and business partners.

Thanks so much to all of our local businesses who generally donated raffle and food items!

foodsponsorcollage

 

A recent working paper, written by Kathleen Traphagen & Saskia Traill and commissioned by the Noyce Foundation, describes the attributes and strategies of 15 leading STEM ecosystem efforts (see #13 & 14 below) throughout the country that include a cross-sector collaboration among formal K-12 education, after-school or summer programs, and/or some type of science-expert organization. STEM learning ecosystems harness unique contributions of educators, policymakers, families, and others in symbiosis toward a comprehensive vision of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education for all children.

stemlearningecosystems

About SMILE:

The SMILE (Science and Math Integrated Learning Experiences) Program has been led by Oregon State University (OSU) for the past quarter century to increase post-secondary enrollment of underserved populations in the STEM fields. SMILE supports after-school clubs serving 650 students grades 4-12 in 35 schools in 13 rural communities throughout the state. Targeting low-income children of color, the clubs meet weekly and are led by 50 school-day science teachers. The SMILE Program has served more than 7,500 students and 365 teachers since its inception. Other components of SMILE include exposure to higher education through college connection events such as day-long trips to a regional college for elementary and middle school club members, an overnight High School Challenge at OSU, and annual Math and Science Family Nights at partner schools for students and their families. SMILE is funded by Oregon State University, local school districts, federal grants, charter schools, and private philanthropy.

About SYNERGIES:

The premise of SYNERGIES is that if one better understands how, when, where, why and with whom children access and use STEM resources across their lifetime, it will be possible to create a community-wide educational system that works more effectively and synergistically. The project has followed approximately 400 fifth graders from 2009 in the Parkrose neighborhood of Portland, along with their peers, siblings and significant adults in their lives. The first two years have been devoted to collecting baseline data and building community alliances, followed by continued data collection as well as community-wide “interventions” designed and executed by the community itself in years three and four. The project focuses on youth’s interest trajectories to determine how (physically and virtually) and why they utilize (formal and informal) community learning resources in order to engage with and learn about STEM. The community’s formal and informal STEM education providers, including Parkrose Public Schools, Multnomah County Library, Portland Zoo, 4H, Mount Hood Community College, Metro Parks, Portland Port Authority, Portland Children’s Museum, the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, and other community-based organizations and businesses, are developing and testing a coordinated approach to facilitating STEM education. The long-term goal is to develop specific strategies and data-based tools to improve STEM learning in Parkrose that can be broadly applied to long-term improvements in STEM public education locally, nationally and internationally. The SYNERGIES project is funded by the Noyce Foundation.

Click the following links to read the full Noyce Foundation report and executive summary.

Some recent faculty news and announcements:

College of Education logo* Darlene Russ-Eft and Dr. Susan Goff (CCLP 16) will be giving a presentation at the upcoming Academy of Human Resource Development conference (www.ahrd.org) in Houston, Texas.  It is based on Sue’s dissertation and is titled: “Temps at the Top: Factors related to the Appointment of Interim Community College Presidents.”

* Darlene Russ-Eft’s latest book (co-authored with Catherine M. Sleezer and Kavita Gupta), “A Practical Guide to Needs Assessment,” will be available this month.

* Cheridy Aduviri has launched a new blog (Tech’d Out Learning) that explores the role of technology in education. Topics include: hybrid course design, educational apps, uses of ipads in the classroom and more. If you have an interest on the role of technology in education, you can also attend the next Technology Committee meeting (Monday, April 7th at 10 am).

* John Falk has been recently granted membership on the National Academy of Science’s Board on Science Education committee on Out-of-School Time (OST) STEM Learning. Here’s a link to more information on the committee and it’s members.

Three visiting scholars from South Korea will be spending the next year at Oregon State University. They will be putting on two workshops (April and October) about science education in Korea. Here are bios and backgrounds on the three scholars below:

Hyo-Suk RyuHyo-Suk Ryu, Post-Doctoral Fellow with the College of Education at Ewha Womans University in Korea

Research Interest
My works have been mainly focused on developing programs and circumstances for secondary students in the formal and informal learning contexts. My dissertation is about the effects of science outreach program based on high school students’ experiences in university laboratory. I also collaborated on the project (called WCU) which is about developing materials and training in-service teachers in order to enhance scientific literacy for the young global citizens at Global Institute for STS education in Korea. My interests also include to boost the awareness and support of the public by expanding the bases of science community and public understanding on science.

Education: 

  • Ewha Womans University (Ph.D. in science education) 2007-2011
  • Ewha Womans University (M.Edu. in physics education) 1998-2002
  • Ewha Womans University (B.S. in science education) 1993-1997

young-shin parkYoung-Shin Park, Assistant Professor at the Dept. of Earth Science Education and Director of the Science Culture Education Center at Chosun University, South Korea

Research Interest
My research interest covers two different tracks; informal science learning as well as formal one. One is about science teaching in formal setting covering teachers’ beliefs and knowledge through induction program as well as teacher preparation program in the context of scientific inquiry and argumentation. I also developed Korea Teacher Observational Protocols (K_TOP) to improve teachers’ teaching strategies on the basis of their teaching practices. The other research interest is about educators’ interacting with visitors in informal setting of science learning, such as how to train science docents to be expertise in their interacting with visitors and how to implement science communication into supplemental educational program and how to analyze science communication embedded in science exhibition. I developed the manual ‘guide for science docent expertise’ in Korean (2012) and the book of ‘introduction to being science educator in science center’ by running professional development program for prospective science educator (2013).

Education

  • Oregon State University (Ph.D. in science education) 1998-2005
  • Oregon State University (M.S. in science education) 1996-1997
  • Seoul National University (B.S. in earth science education) 1987-1991

jonghee kimJonghee Kim, Associate Professor with the Department of Earth Science Education at Chonnam National University in South Korea

Research Areas & Interests
Earth Science education

  • Misconception
  • Task Analysis in Earth Science
  • Informal science education (science museum)
  • ICT education, Computer-assisted science learning
  • Special education for the gifted

Resent Research Theme
Development Applications for the Diagnostic & Formative Assessment in the Earth Science Class

Education
Busan National University (Ph. D. in Earth Science Education) 1997- 2003
Busan National University (M.S. in Earth Science Education) 1989-1994
Busan National University (B.S. in Earth Science Education) 1985- 1989