Hello,

We are pleased to announce the 2021 Center for Quantitative Life Sciences (CQLS) Fall Conference.  This will be a full day online event on Friday, September 17, 2021 (apologies for those who did not receive a notice about this previously. There was an issue with the list serve).  In celebration of our recent name change, the theme for this year is “Frontiers at the Intersection of the Life & Quantitative Sciences.” Because this is our first conference since our name change (and because the event is fully online this year) the conference this year is completely free for all attendees. We hope you will join us.

We strongly encourage all participants to submit a poster for the online poster session. Registered posters will be judged for cash prizes in three categories; Undergraduate Student, Graduate Student, and Post-Doctoral Fellow/Trainee. Since the event is online, a physical poster does not need to be printed. Rather, you will need to submit in advance a high-quality pdf and a stable internet connection. Lightning Talks will be limited to 5 minutes and no more than 5 slides.  Registered lighting talks will also be eligible for a cash prize.

Register in Advance

Or copy and paste the URL below into your internet browser:
https://oregonstate.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_2tcSPOyfnG3beJw


On behalf of the organizing committee:

  • Kevin Brown, Pharmaceutical Sciences, OSU/OHSU
  • Molly Burke, Integrative Biology, OSU
  • Maude David, Microbiology & Pharmaceutical Sciences, OSU
  • Patrick De Leenheer, Mathematics, OSU
  • Perry Hystad, Public Health and Human Science, OSU
  • Natalia Shulzhenko, Immunology, OSU

Genomics Lab Technician opening in the Center for Genome Research and Biocomputing

The Center for Genome Research and Biocomputing at Oregon State University is searching for a lab technician for its genomics core facility. The appointee will be conduct services for Center collaborators spanning DNA and RNA extraction, DNA sequencing, genotyping, high throughput sequencing, and PCR assays as needed. A significant portion of the work will involve viral detection and sequencing. The position is a full-time 1 year appointment. Minimum qualifications include a relevant undergraduate degree and at least 12 months’ experience working in a molecular biology research or service laboratory. For more information, and to apply for the position go to jobs.oregonstate.edu and search for posting P04217UF.

The Center for Genome Research and Biocomputing at Oregon State University collaborates with and assists life scientists of all levels in their research using cutting-edge genomics, informatics and computational techniques. An important component of the CGRB’s activities is the molecular biology and genomics laboratory.

To ensure full consideration, applications must be received by March 18, 2021. Applications will continue to be accepted until March 25, 2021. The closing date is subject to change without notice to applicants. For questions, contact Brett Tyler brett.tyler@oregonstate.edu

OSU commits to inclusive excellence by advancing equity and diversity in all that we do. We are an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity employer, and particularly encourage applications from members of historically underrepresented racial/ethnic groups, women, individuals with disabilities, veterans, LGBTQ community members, and others who demonstrate the ability to help us achieve our vision of a diverse and inclusive community.

Matthew Peterson

Congratulations to our very own Matthew Peterson, who has been appointed a 2021 Trusted CI Fellow. Trusted CI is a National Science Foundation (NSF) Cybersecurity Center of Excellence. The Trusted CI Fellows program empowers members of the scientific community with knowledge of cybersecurity and trains fellows to serve as cybersecurity liaisons to their respective communities. Six fellows are selected across the nation each year. To read more about Trusted CI and the other five fellows for 2021, check out the Trusted CI blog post about the 2021 fellows.

INTRODUCTION TO PYTHON

Introduction to Python I:
This module introduces programming concepts, driven by examples of biological data analysis, in the Python programming language. Topics covered will include variables and data types (including strings, integers and floats, dictionaries and lists), control flow (loops, conditionals, and
some boolean logic), variable scope and its proper use, basic usage of regular expressions, functions, file input and output, and interacting
with the larger Unix/Linux environment.

Introduction to Python II:
Part II expands on basic programming and explores using ‘objects’ (and their blueprints: classes) in encapsulating functionality into easily used blocks of code that more closely match the biological concepts at hand. Other topics include APIs, syntactic sugar, and creating and using packages such as BioPython.

January 4 – March 12

Monday/Wednesday 2:00-2:50 PM, BDS 599 (CRN:38557 and 38558) or as a workshop
Instructor: Matthew Peterson, matthew@cgrb.oregonstate.edu
for more information, email the instructor or visit: https://cgrb.oregonstate.edu/training/workshops

ENVIRONMENTAL SEQUENCE ANALYSIS

Gain practical experience with, 16s rRNA amplicon sequencing and shotgun metagenomics. No command line / R-studio experience required! Starting with raw FASTQ files, learn how to 1) profile rRNA sequences and 2) determine the taxonomy and functional composition of metagenomics samples!

January 4 – March 12

Tuesday/Thursday 10:00-10:50 AM, BDS 599 (CRN 38546) or as a workshop
Instructor: Andrew Black, andrew@cgrb.oregonstate.edu
For more information, email the instructor or visit: https://cgrb.oregonstate.edu/training/workshops

NOVEMBER 12, 2020

Photo courtesy of The Corvallis Advocate

From The Corvallis Advocate: “Oregon State University brought its TRACE Community COVID-19 testing program to Eugene, sending three-member teams – one OSU student, one UO student and one professional –to city neighborhoods to collect nasal-swab samples from hundreds of residents and sewage samples from around Eugene and Springfield. This will further expand TRACE’s coverage, which includes five similar sweeps in Corvallis, as well as some study in Bend, Hermiston and Newport. TRACE will be working in tandem with UO’s Monitoring and Assessment Program (MAP).” See the full article for more information.