2019 Dean’s Dinner and Awards Ceremony

This year’s Dean’s Dinner was held on May 14, after the grand opening of the A. A. “Red” Emmerson Advanced Wood Products Laboratory.

After opening remarks from Anthony Davis, Interim Dean for the College of Forestry, three outstanding alumni were honored. Jim Johnson, interim department head of Forest Engineering, Resources & Management, presented the award to Mike Cloughesy. Mike graduated from OSU with a M.S. in Forest Science in 1983 and is currently the Director of Forestry for the Oregon Forest Resources Institute, a statewide forestry education agency. He is responsible for the development and implementation of OFRI’s forestry education programs for landowners and the general public.

Troy Hall, department head of Forest Ecosystems and Society, presented the award to Cristina Eisenberg. Cristina graduated from OSU with a PH.D. in Forestry and Wildlife in 2012. She has worked as the Chief Scientist at Earthwatch Institute, an organization based in Boston, Massachusetts since 2014.

Eric Hansen, department head of Wood Science and Engineering, presented the award to Jerrold E. Winandy. Jerrold graduated from OSU with a PH.D. in Wood Science and Engineering in 1993. He is now principal partner of Winandy & Associates LLC and an adjunct professor in the Department of Bioproducts and Biosystems Engineering at the University of Minnesota. Congratulations to each of our outstanding alumni!

Each year the College of Forestry is honored and privileged to award graduate fellowships and undergraduate scholarships to deserving new and returning students. 134 undergraduate students were selected to receive scholarships totaling $486,060 for the 2019-20 academic year. Nicole Kent, our head advisor, helped congratulate these students. Twenty six graduate students, both Master- and PhD- level, received college fellowships totaling just over $121,500 for the 2019-20 academic year.

Donor contributions make a difference in the lives of our students by allowing them to fulfill their dreams of a college education, and to be successful contributors in our communities after graduation. These are the stewards of our forest ecosystems and economies, and I cannot think of a greater return on investment than their education. Donors and alumni, thank you for your wonderful generosity and outstanding contributions to the College!
To honor the dedication shown by those who support students in the College, two faculty awards were presented. The Xi Sigma Pi Julie Kliever Mentorship Award went to Bogdan Strimbu and the Aufderheide Award to Laurie Schimleck.

The evening wrapped up with two student awards. The winner of the Pack Essay Award was Paul B. Pliess for his essay: “Multicultural Stakeholders in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge”. The Photo of the Year award went to Graham Lyons, for his photo taken in the California Coastal Redwoods.

Staying busy, making an impact

Oregon State University College of Forestry Ph.D. Student Pipiet Larasatie doesn’t have her head stuck in her books. She’s a serious learner and researcher, of course, but she’s not just concerned with her own projects. Instead, she’s working hard to make the college community and industry setting more open and inclusive for all.

She began working toward this goal in her home country of Indonesia. After earning her bachelor’s degree, she served as a civil servant in the forestry service and helped develop rural areas for ecotourism opportunities.

After earning her master’s degree in New Zealand, Larasatie was awarded a prestigious scholarship from the Indonesian government – the opportunity to earn a Ph.D. anywhere in the world, as long as the program was highly ranked.

Larasatie chose Oregon State.

“I came here because I wanted to work with Eric Hansen, who now serves as department head of Wood Science and Engineering,” Larasatie says. “All I knew about Oregon State was that Eric was here, and that he has expertise in forest products marketing and innovation, and that’s what I wanted to study.”

Hansen responded to Larasatie’s inquiry about the wood science graduate degree program quickly, despite the 14-hour time difference. “I knew that because he was responsive, it would be easy to build a relationship with him,” Larasatie says.

And it was. Luckily, Larasatie likes living in Corvallis as well.

Since arriving in 2016, Larasatie has already completed one research project about the Pacific Northwest’s public perception of mass timber buildings. What started as a class project became a peer reviewed, published research study, funded by the Oregon Forest Resources Institute, and a presentation to conference participants worldwide.

Larasatie enjoys presenting her work to scientists, industry partners and even members of the public.

“I believe that science should be communicated,” she says. “I don’t want to write a dissertation that only lives in a library archive somewhere. We need to reach a broader audience. We need to let the public know what we’re doing. We shouldn’t limit ourselves, especially because of the digital age we live in now.”

To emphasize this, Larasatie serves as a digital communication coordinator for the Society of Wood Science and Technology and participates in the steering committee for the Western Forestry Graduate Research Symposium, hosted at Oregon State each spring.

“I campaign to my fellow graduate students to get them involved as well,” she says. “I really believe that we all need to practice communicating our science.”

Larasatie also serves on the College of Forestry Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Committee, which strives to make the college a diverse and welcoming environment.

“I felt that participating was the right thing to do,” she says. “It also relates to my dissertation topic.”

Larasatie’s dissertation is still in the research phase. She’s studying gender diversity in the forest sector, in the industry and in higher education.

“Increasing gender diversity is no longer a right thing to do, but becomes a smart thing to do,” she says.

Larasatie’s dream is to become a university professor.

“I like to do research, I like to teach, and I like to mentor young students,” she says. “I also like the university setting. Oregon State, for example, is a hub for international people coming in to reach their dreams. We all have the same goal: to make life better.”

2018 Dean’s Awards and Retiree Recognition

On Thursday, March 15, we recognized our 2018 Dean’s Award recipients and retirees with an awards ceremony and celebration.

Dana Warren and Temesgen Hailermariam were recognized for outstanding achievement in Mentorship of Graduate Students. Students who nominated Dana said he is an exceptional mentor, role model, and friend, and does everything he can to make sure they succeed. Students noted, “Temesgen takes care to consider students’ career interests and life goals, while at the same time challenging them to strive further than their own expectations”.

Raquel Albee was awarded for outstanding achievement in Graduate Student Leadership. Student nominators say, “She is extremely talented as an instructor and is able to convey information to students in an informational and relatable way. She is patient and kind.”

Devon Costa and Brent McGrath were recognized for outstanding achievement in Contributions as a Student Worker. Nominators for Devon said, “Devon had a great deal of enthusiasm regardless of the task that she was working on, and worked extremely hard to keep our facilities in Richardson Hall in good shape”. Brent’s nominators said, “Brent’s hard work has more than likely affected everyone in the College that has ever needed wood processed, digital design work, as well as CNC routing, laser engraving, and 3D printing completed for research purposes”.

Michelle Maller was awarded for outstanding achievement in Fostering Undergraduate Student Success. She is known as our Undergraduate Wizard! Her nominators say, “She makes sure Renewable Materials students are well cared for and have myriad opportunities for professional development, and ultimately, success”.

Ryan Brown is the inaugural recipient of the Pauline Barto Award for Commitment to Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI). This award is named in honor of Pauline Barto, the first woman to join and graduate from the College of Forestry in 1939. Ryan is the Recreation and Engagement Program Manager of the College Research Forests. Nominators noted, “One of the many ways she has contributed to the College DEI plan is to ensure local Native American history is told with their input and that our communications are appropriate and accurate”.

Lauren Rennan was recognized for Outstanding Achievement in Distinction to the College. Lauren’s nominator said, “Lauren is a joy to work with, an asset to our college, and absolutely worthy of the Dean’s Award for Outstanding Achievement in Distinction to the College”. Just wait until you see her Renewable Materials semi-truck wrap on the I-5 corridor!

Retirees Jerry Mohr, Ken West and Penny Wright were recognized for their service to the college. Jerry joined the Forestry Computing Resources group in 2000 as the research computing application coordinator and quickly become the point person for the instructional labs. Ken joined the College in 1995 in the Forest Science Department, first with Darrell Ross, and then as a member of the Quantitative Sciences Group with Susan Stafford, doing any and all manner of computer support and administration. Many of you may not realize Penny White’s retired because we’ve been lucky enough to continue to keep her busy for a while longer! Most recently she was in the Business Office as the Finance and Accounting Manager continuing her long service to the College.

Northwest Hardwoods donates $25,000 of lumber

OFSC construction

Northwest Hardwoods, Inc. (NWH), the leading manufacturer of high quality hardwood lumber in North America, donated $25,000 worth of lumber to the new Oregon Forest Science Complex. The lumber donation of alder wood will be used as cladding for the outside of the new building.

“The Oregon State University College of Forestry is an internationally-recognized leader in education, research and policy for managing and sustaining working forest ecosystems,” says Don Barton, vice president of sales and marketing for Northwest Hardwoods. “It’s a natural fit for us to be a part of the next metamorphosis of forestry management and sustainability.”

Oregon State University and the College of Forestry officially launched a $79.5 million initiative in January 2015 to build the Oregon Forest Science Complex. Once completed, the state-of-the-art facility will provide current and future students with a transformative educational experience across a full range of forestry and natural resources degree programs.

“Northwest Hardwoods’ gift and in-kind donation will enable us to build a new, engineered wood facility that will inspire students and create a beautiful, inviting and healthy space for them to learn,” says Acting Dean Anthony S. Davis. “Grown and made in Oregon, the facility will reinforce our status as a place where students go to find innovative solutions to complex challenges, so they can improve our forest landscapes, ecosystems, and communities.”