Upcoming Workshops and Citizen Science

Workshops

Sudden Oak Death In Port Orford Webinar Series

This two part webinar series is focused on the Sudden Oak Death infestation in Port Orford. Join Oregon State University Extension, Oregon Department of Forestry, and other partners to learn more about the Sudden Oak Death infestation in Port Orford. Participants will learn what Sudden Oak Death is, how it spreads, symptoms to watch out for, the treatment approach, sampling and detection strategies, current research, citizen science opportunities and funding opportunities.

Photo by Norma Kline

Webinar Session 1: Tuesday. September 14 (4:00 – 5:30 pm). In session 1 we will provide a general Sudden Oak Death background (what it is, how it spreads, symptoms), treatment approach, what can folks do? NRCS cost share information

Recording of Session 1 can be downloaded here

Webinar Session 2: Wednesday. September 22 (4:00- 5:30 pm). In session 2 we will cover the survey and sampling approach, lab diagnostics and research, citizen science.

Credit voucher for SAF credits can be downloaded here

This webinar is free but registration is required. Register: here


Oregon State University Extension Service prohibits discrimination in all its programs, services, activities, and materials on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, gender identity (including gender expression), sexual orientation, disability, age, marital status, familial/parental status, income derived from a public assistance program, political beliefs, genetic information, veteran’s status, reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs.)

Accommodation requests related to a disability should be made at least two weeks prior to the webinar(s) in which you intend to participate. Contact Norma Kline at 541-808-7771

Citizen Science Opportunities

Bucket with leaf bait. Photo by Norma Kline

Bucket baiting for the early detection of Sudden Oak Death. Tanoaks infested by the pathogen (Phytophthora ramorum) that causes Sudden Oak Death may be symptom free for many months. Infested asymptomatic trees produce spores that are easily carried by wind and rain across the landscape; spreading the disease. Landowners living at the leading edge of Sudden Oak Death infections can help with early detection efforts by placing bucket baits under apparently healthy tanoak trees and collecting the baits every two weeks for analysis by the OSU Leboldus lab. Bucket baiting typically takes place in the fall and winter and has a 6 week duration. Volunteers sign up as OSU volunteer citizen scientists. All supplies are provided. More information to be announced.

Stream bait. Photo by Sarah Navarro.

Stream baiting for the early detection of Sudden Oak Death. Landowners with a stream on their property can choose to participate in the stream baiting project. Infested trees are sometimes difficult to detect in the upper reaches of stream drainages. Infested tanoaks Spores from infested trees can be carried downstream and detected by stream baiting. Stream baits are collected every two weeks for analysis by the OSU Leboldus lab. Stream baiting occurs mainly in the spring and summer months and has a 6 week duration. Volunteers sign up as OSU volunteer citizen scientists. All supplies are provided. More information to be announced.

Searching for disease resistant tanoak. Community members that live, work or play in the generally infested area in and around Brookings Oregon can participate in the search for disease resistant tanoak. Restoring tanoak successfully to infested areas will depend on developing a tanoak genetic resistance program; a long term process involving growing and testing potential seedlings in greenhouse trials. Identifying surviving tanoaks in areas with long term  infestations is the first step in a genetic resistance program. We would like your help in identifying surviving tanoak in infested areas.

Document the locations of potential disease resistant tanoak using the TreeSnap app. The TreeSnap app from the University of Tennessee (2017) allows users to document tree characteristics and locations of candidate trees with their smartphone. This app can be downloaded from your App store.

Users of the TreeSnap app agree to the terms of use policy which includes the following: by using this app you agree that you will not collect observations for trees on private land without permission. Observations may only be submitted for trees on public land, trees on the user’s own private land, or trees on other private land for which the  user has obtained all necessary permissions from the private land owner. For full terms of use refer to: https://treesnap.org

How to identify possible disease resistant tanoak: Your location is important. We are looking for surviving trees in areas that have high levels of tanoak mortality for a number of years. The area referred to as the generally infested area in and around Brookings is a good place to start.

Surviving trees. Do you see a tanoak that appears to be surviving among other tanoaks that are dying? Is it completely healthy or perhaps it seems like it has been suffering for quite a while, but is still alive?  Either of these conditions are interesting to us. Trees in obvious decline and dead trees are not candidates.

Download the Treesnap app from your trusted app store. Once you are in the app, select tanoak, and answer a few short questions about the candidate tree: diameter, canopy health, presence of acorns. Use your smartphone to take a photo of the tree, this automatically geolocates the tree. Find more information on Treesnap here: https://treesnap.org/

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