For many people the idea of putting in a two weeks’ notice has a negative connotation attached to it, when in reality it can be seen as a step in the right direction. If a job is not working for you, don’t feel obligated to work in misery. Miserable workers are not exactly the most productive workers. Do keep in mind that I am by no means advocating that people put in a two weeks’ notice at the first sign of discomfort. Instead I am suggesting that people consider moving on if solutions to issues have been given a fair shot. Once you have established that things just are not working out, you can take comfort in knowing that finding a new job that better suits you is beneficial for all involved. Obviously, eliminating the daily debate of whether or not to call in “sick” to work helps you achieve a healthier mental state, but also remember that when the right job for you has been secured, the company or organization you’re working for will also benefit from your enthusiasm to contribute. Additionally, leaving a job provides room for someone else who might be a better fit for the position to come in.

Now that we have established that leaving a job is not the worst thing in the world, the actual process of leaving can now be addressed. Just like any other type of relationship, there is definitely a bad and a best way to put an end to things. Here are a few things to keep in mind when going through the motions of putting your two weeks in…

  1. At the very least notify your employer two weeks before your intended last day keeping in mind that the more time you give them the better.
  2. Type up a short letter clearly stating when your last day of availability will be.
  3. In your letter stating your last day of availability do offer to help your employer out by training new personnel, passing along unfinished tasks etc. in order to create a smooth transition for all.
  4. Before notifying your boss, plan ahead deciding what you would like to say. This will ensure that the conversation is kept professional and eliminates the potential for emotions to arise.
  5. If possible, notify your boss in person. Give them the typed up letter for future reference.
  6. In your conversation with your boss or in your letter stating your last day of availability, don’t feel like you have to explain why you’re leaving.
  7. Finish up any projects or figure out who will finish them once you are gone.
  8. Only notify your colleagues that you’re leaving once you have told your boss.
  9. Finish strong. Don’t peter out on your daily attendance, tasks or termly goals.
  10. Ask your boss if they would mind being a future reference for you. Of course only do this if your overall time at the company/ organization consisted of a positive experience.

With a little bit of careful planning, the seemingly scary task of putting in a two weeks’ notice can be viewed from a completely different angle. I’m sure many of us have heard the saying “when one door closes another door opens”. It’s important to realize that you have the power to close the door. Don’t wait for someone else to close it for you. Instead know that submitting a two weeks’ notice can get you one step closer to your career goals and give you the potential to thrive.

posted by Adriana Aguilar, Career Assistant

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