150 Species Sustained

OSU’s Department of Fisheries and Wildlife has been operating since 1935, helping to manage the conservation of species through their research. The goal of faculty and students is to provide the public with knowledge to help make more informed decisions on “issues of conservation, sustainable use and ecosystem restoration”, and to contribute to the conservation […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

June 16, 2018

OSU’s Department of Fisheries and Wildlife has been operating since 1935, helping to manage the conservation of species through their research. The goal of faculty and students is to provide the public with knowledge to help make more informed decisions on “issues of conservation, sustainable use and ecosystem restoration”, and to contribute to the conservation of natural resources. The Department continues to grow every year — providing “comprehensive research, education, and outreach programs” pertaining to the management of fish and wildlife resources and conservation biology.

As part of OSU 150, the department created 150 Species Sustained Project – a slideshow that encompasses 150 species that have been influenced by OSU researchers through policy, management decision, or conservation plans. Each slide contains photos, facts, and the names of the researchers behind these accomplishments. For example, see the entry for Red-Legged Kittiwake, influenced by Rachael Orben:

Latin name: Rissa brevirostris: Red-legged kittiwakes are endemic to the Bering Sea. In the 1980s populations of this seabird declined, prompting the IUCN to list the species as ‘Vulnerable’. Reasons for the decline are unknown. In 2010, Dr. Rachael Orben began tracking this species during its winter migrations so that its year-round spatial ecology could be considered when assessing factors influencing populations changes.  Additionally, she is studying carry-over effects to better link migration behavior to egg laying and reproductive success to the winter migration. This approach will help to understand the trade-offs individuals might make during suboptimal environmental conditions.  

Did you know? The majority (~70%) of red-legged kittiwakes nest on the tall sea cliffs of St. George Island.  They specialize on foraging for myctophid fishes and squids in the waters to the southwest of the island. They are smaller than black-legged kittiwakes with larger eyes, shorter legs, shorter bills, and red legs. Red-legged kittiwakes winter in the Bering Sea and western North Pacific. They sound like squeaky toys. “

Red Legged Kittiwake – Department of Fisheries and Wildlife

Check out the full slideshow here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

CATEGORIES: Uncategorized


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *