African-Americans are among the top owners of mobile devices, but aren’t being considered when it’s time for social media and technology companies to hire.

The National Urban League is highlighting this new technology gap in its 2018 State of Black America report released Thursday, and pushing social media and technology companies to put in place safeguards and corporation solutions to make sure minorities don’t get left behind in the digital revolution.

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In the past few weeks, a black student at Yale University had the police called on her for napping in a common room, and two Native American teenagers, prospective students at Colorado State University, were stopped on a campus tour after another parent was reportedly nervous, calling them “creepy” in a 911 call.

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University of California at Los Angeles and University of Arizona researchers released data this week that examined how colleges and universities often steer clear of poor communities and communities of color in off-campus recruiting.

While most colleges and universities present themselves as institutions open to a diverse range of students, regardless of race or socioeconomic status, research gathered by EMRA Research (Enrollment, Management, Recruiting & Access) shows a decided trend in off-campus recruiting.

Utilizing digital data collection techniques that “webscrape” public websites, EMRA discovered that off-campus recruitment, such as visits to high schools and college fairs by representatives of colleges and universities, prioritized wealthier communities and White communities and often overlooked poor communities and communities of color.

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As college tuition continues to rise at a staggering rate, people tend to worry about how much harder it becomes for students and families to pay for college.

In an article in The Conversation online, researchers who focus on higher education said they found a different reason to worry.

“We examined tuition hikes at public four-year colleges and universities over a 14-year period. We wanted to see if tuition increases at public colleges and universities changed the racial and ethnic makeup of students on campus,” according to their study report. “What we found is that for every $1,000 increase in tuition at four-year non-selective public universities, diversity among full-time students decreased by 4.5 percent.”

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“Dear Nigger Professor.” That was the beginning of a message that was sent to me. There is nothing to be cherished here, despite the salutation. Years ago, Malcolm X asked, “What does a white man call a black man with a Ph.D.?” He answered: “A nigger with a Ph.D.”

The message came in response to an op-ed I published in The New York Times in December 2015.

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Orchestras are among America’s least racially diverse institutions. African-American musicians accounted for only 1.8 percent of the nation’s orchestra players in 2014, according to an industry study, which found that the figure had not grown in over a decade.

Three national organizations aim to change that, announcing on Wednesday that they are joining forces to try to help more African-American and Hispanic musicians audition for and land coveted orchestra jobs.

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A week after two black men were arrested at a Starbucks store in Philadelphia, the company announced plans to close 8,000 stores across the country on May 29 for an afternoon of racial bias education.

Many people remain skeptical if such training will actually work and prevent further incidents like this, and it’s not entirely known what the afternoon of training will include.

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Everyday acts of systemic racism such as racial profiling, racial microaggressions and racial violence are a terrifying reality for racially and ethnically minoritized students, faculty and staff at predominately White institutions across the United States. As these occurrences continue, these institutions have attempted to address the violence and blatant racism through hiring diversity consultants, offering workshops and establishing multicultural affairs departments.

Yet, the insidious and blatant forms of racism remain intact. As Black women scholars who have been invited to serve as campus consultants around issues of racial diversity, we often grapple with this work, knowing that despite our efforts, racism and White supremacy are here to stay.

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