Author Archives: Funmi Amobi

About Funmi Amobi

Funmi Amobi is an instructional consultant and College Liaison in Oregon State University’s Center for Teaching and Learning. Funmi provides consultations to faculty in individual and small group settings to support teaching excellence and student success. Funmi holds a doctorate degree in secondary education with major emphasis in curriculum and instruction from Arizona State University. As a reflective practitioner, she is a life-long student of the scholarship of teaching and learning. To schedule a Sparkshop call Funmi @ 541 737 1338 or email: Funmi.Amobi@OregonState.edu

Elevating Student Engagement in Breakout Rooms

Students want to interact with each other. In fact, they learn better when they do. In a national survey of undergraduate students during the COVID-19 pandemic, 65% of participants identified the opportunity to collaborate with other students as one of … Continue reading

Posted in Center for Teaching and Learning | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Four Strategies for Facilitating Group Activities in Remote and Hybrid/Blended Classes

One of the biggest pedagogical shifts in moving in-person classes to remote learning involves modifying active learning activities. Online courses which are designed from the ground up without face-to-face meetings have many ways to engage students (Forbes, 2020). The challenge … Continue reading

Posted in Center for Teaching and Learning | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Should You Require Students To Turn On Their Zoom Cameras?

Getting students actively engaged in learning is the desired goal of instruction in all modalities. The pivot to remote teaching has rekindled productive inquiry about evidence-based strategies for fostering student-instructor, student-content, and student-student forms of interaction in the virtual classroom. … Continue reading

Posted in Center for Teaching and Learning | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Reassessing Assessment in Covid-19 Crisis: The Importance of Discursive and Performative Reflection

The Covid-19-forced pivot to remote teaching has upended productive discourse about evidence-based pedagogical practices. The recurring theme in the myriad of recommendations and best practices for engaging students in remote learning is the need to communicate care and hope, and … Continue reading

Posted in Center for Teaching and Learning | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Bringing out Students’ Best Assets in Remote Teaching: Questioning Reconsidered

To say that these are unprecedented times in higher education is becoming an understatement. Across the country, traditional face-to-face classes are now in remote delivery. University teachers are working assiduously to approximate as much as possible the best practices of … Continue reading

Posted in Center for Teaching and Learning | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Going Far Together: The Benefits of Participating in a Faculty Learning Community

“If you want to go fast, go alone; if you want to go far, go together.” Faculty learning communities (FLCs) provide a fail-safe place for university educators with a common interest in innovative teaching and learning practices to go far … Continue reading

Posted in Center for Teaching and Learning | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Two Heads Are Better Than One: Tips for Making Group Work Work

Group work is a critical element of active learning (Freeman et al. 2014; Brame & Biel, 2015, Hodge, 2017; Tombak & Altun, 2016). The benefits of group work range from promoting learning, metacognition and academic success to developing social interaction, … Continue reading

Posted in Center for Teaching and Learning | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

It’s OK to Lecture: Tips for Priming Lecture With Active Learning Structures and Techniques

The lecture method has come under serious criticism in recent times (Haave, 2019). A body of research attests to the benefits of active learning (Freeman et al., 2014; Deslauriers et al., 2019). In view of the upsurge of support for … Continue reading

Posted in Center for Teaching and Learning | Leave a comment

Lesson Planning Matters: Learning Points from Tuesday Teaching Talk

Lesson Planning Matters: Learning Points from Tuesday Teaching Talk “Teaching in a university classroom requires preparation and a redirection of focus. The teaching is not about us; it’s about the students” (Hara, 2010). I recently facilitated my first Tuesday Teaching … Continue reading

Posted in Center for Teaching and Learning | Leave a comment