Interviews- Week 5


While this may be titled chapter 1, it’s far from the beginning. It’s actually no particular starting point of reason. I started a new job, in a new town where I have to use my maps to get from my house to my office, and the only people I know are my new coworkers. I have a lot riding on this job, it’s all I have for the time being to set me up in this new chapter of my life. Over the past 6 years I have had a variety of jobs in several industries. Each with their own enjoyment and challenges. But the most important things I have taken away from all of these experiences is, if you like the people you work with and there is a good management dynamic, you can look forward to going to work each day instead of dreading it. While you can learn to like your job, you typically know right off the bat if you like your manager or not. Liking your manager doesn’t mean your friends or hang out on the weekend, but they have earned your respect as a person you can count on to execute tasks needed for you to be successful. Managers care about the people they are overseeing, the physical and mental health in and out of the worksite is a top priority. As I read on “Fortune 100 Best Companies to Work for 2020”, all of the employees share stories of how they know their company cares about them and establishes a work site that became their support system. People want managers that they can talk to, receive affirmation and guidance and are inclusive of all the dynamics of life that effects people’s ability to work. Companies cannot succeed with poor management. But managers are faced with the challenge of living up to all of these expectations. The greatest managers sacrifice the most and neglect the very same thing they are fighting to give their workers. They have to provide trainings, stay up on policy’s, schedule work and so much more depending on the job. They are the backbone to the company.

I one day will be the manager that makes my workplace a safe space where people feel like they matter. The wellbeing of the people around me are critical in today’s world. Balance between work and homelife is the most important thing I could stress. People can be replaced at work, but never at home.

Works Cited: Fortune 100 Best Companies to Work For® 2020 | Great Place to Work®

A lot of important events in my life have started with a simple interview. I say simple because they are so common, not because they are easy. I bet I have done 50 plus interviews over the last 10 years between awards, scholarships and jobs. Out of those 50 I could tell you my best and worst interview without a second thought. With interviews being so common it’s only fair we looked deeper into the effectiveness behind them when relating to reliability, validity and utility. While we hear so much about how to be successful as an interviewee, what we don’t hear about is how to be a successful interviewer. My best tips would be, review the applicants material. They put a small amount on their resume, but they have more skills they can expand on if asked. Nothing makes me feel more confident and recognized than when asked to expand on something off my resume. Interviews need to have structure, there should be questions that are open ended and about the company. Going in with a plan is a must but entertaining conversation and letting the pace flow will let it naturally develop. Interviewees feed of your body language and comments. There needs to be eye contact when they are speaking without starting into their soul. Smile and nod your head when they are talking. Things I discourage that an interviewer does it have pre interview judgement based off the given applicant material or word of mouth. This will affect how you act in the interview even if you’re not trying to. Lastly, while I can agree first impressions are extremely important on both ends, try to conduct a fair and positive interview because sometimes first impressions are altered by the circumstances or environment and can be faulty.

Sources: Lecture 3: Improving Interview Effectiveness

Week 5 – Learning Materials: HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT (MGMT_453_X400_U2022) (oregonstate.edu)

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