The Extension website launched in the summer of 2018. At that time, hundreds of faculty and staff needed to learn how to migrate and manage content in the new system. This meant learning the different content types and responsibilities of their designated groups.

Educational content would now be driven by and managed by program areas (via content teams). And, based on topics of expertise, not county locations.

Content teams, made up of subject matter experts, became the core of content coordination. These working groups needed to decide how best to function together. Not always an easy task. Web content priorities often fell through the cracks of busy schedules.

A shift occurred in 2020. Thanks for this goes to the program leaders. They recognized the need for allotted time in one person’s role to support faculty working on the website.

In most cases, these people also serve as a content team leader. The exception is Ag, where a bridge person helps all the 34 content team leaders, although some of their teams are self-sufficient.

These 10 designated people serve as a single point of contact — the liaison between the content team(s) and the program area leader and the Extension web and content strategy team. What does this look like and who are these amazing people?

 

  • Adriene Koett-Cronn works on content strategy for Sea Grant. She makes sure their publications, faculty and events get represented on Extension’s site. She brings good innovations to this role and is a joy to work alongside.

 

  • Amanda Bielenberg-Hayes works with Open Campus to help the counties, where they have a presence, share information about their program. She also is gearing up to coordinate how their program could fit within the Extension site. She brings attention to detail and effusive gratitude to her liaison role.

 

  • Candi Bothum, Jaime Guillén and Trisha Applebee work with the 4-H statewide program area and their local programs across the state to coordinate communication. They also help with consistency in structure, design and program resources. This trio stepped into a big role and navigate it with good intentions and a willingness to listen and learn.

 

  • Jessica Green works with the Ag Extension program teams to show how the Extension website can meet their needs on topic or project pages. She is always willing to fill the gaps from adding images to answering questions to researching new information on request. Her friendly nature helps others to understand and use the tools available.

 

  • Kristen Moore works with the cross-program youth education content team. She thinks through their topic categories and the process to get resources from across Extension on to the site. Her experience with the website structure and the ability to see the big picture is useful to facilitate a way forward for this new and ambitious team.

 

  • LeAnn Locher works with the Master Gardener program statewide, their local programs and the Horticulture content team. She helps to coordinate consistency in messaging, design, content updates and outreach strategies. Her strong communication skills, equity perspective and easy-going nature enhance the work of this dedicated team.

 

  • Teresa Crowley works with the Family and Community Health program area across all their programs. She has been essential in translating needs and setting up content on the site from the very beginning. She brings her wit and experience to know the best route forward, and she candidly persists when requests press in from all sides.

 

  • Shannon Murray works with Forestry and Natural Resources Extension to arrange web training and keep a pulse on content and program pages. She aptly stepped into the role recently to carry on their organized approach to content management in meeting the needs of all their team members.

 

As a season for giving thanks, let us recognize each of their ongoing efforts and contributions. They help to meet a need, come up with new solutions and further the process of Extension’s content strategy. Thank you for all you do!

“There are clear champions related to the digital strategy,” said Anita Azarenko at a quarterly conversation last summer. “Is there a way to capture that enthusiasm, that energy, to help the web and content strategy team help others? I’m not saying put more on your plate because some of you are already doing this, but how can you help others make this transition?”

At our Extension annual conference in December, our web team saw some champions at work. We observed Extension faculty coaching colleagues on producing peer-reviewed educational content. We heard people talking about how topic pages or journey maps function. And we had full rooms of people at our sessions hoping to learn more and get their questions answered.

We also want to recognize the 50 people who were most active in 2019 to keep the content current. They dove in and put things into the new content management system, so it could show up on the Extension website. Thank you!

Looking forward

As we start the new year, we will look for champions who share their best practices or how-to tips with others. Or, implement new processes as a team. Here are 3 ways you can contribute in 2020 to helping your colleagues:

  1. Convene your group or team to put together a content calendar or make decisions about recurring questions
  2. Subscribe to these blog posts to stay up to date, and share as a regular agenda item at your future meetings
  3. Join others to present a peer-based training or contribute your thoughts in a Navigator blog post

Jen Holt, who coordinates Oregon Master Beekeeper and Oregon Bee Atlas programs, shared her experiences with the transition.

“At first, I was a slightly unwilling participant. I had an established program with an existing website that had served us well for many years,” she explained during the Extension annual conference.

“Yet, once I got started I grew in my understanding and use of the new Extension website. I have been using this website for a year now, and the finished product greatly exceeds what we were using in the past.”

She admits the hardest part is learning the terminology, but that the help docs can be your friend. She likes that new pathways of involvement are now available online:

  • The interactive features for the general public to have their questions answered
  • The ability to highlight a list of their publications and events based on tags
  • A way to tie into the larger OSU and Extension community.

View her slides and notes for her presentation.

Would you like to share your experiences in a future blog post? Contact us to let us know.

Roundup of Web Updates during 2019

If you missed out on reading the posts last year or want a recap, this roundup will get you on track with what we did:
  • Launched new designs for county landing pages, local focus areas and the Extension homepage. We also made it easier to show different style formats.
  • Added many new tools groups can see when logged into the site. You can now see feedback from visitors and analytics dashboards to show their activity. Also, review any revisions notes from EESC copyediting.
  • Answered over 600 support requests from Extension faculty and staff throughout the past year. As a result, we made many iterative changes to existing features to make the site work for different situations.
  • Hired a new Salesforce programmer who has met with different groups. He shared how this new constituent relationship management system can apply to Extension’s work in the future.
  • Held trainings around the state, and taught how to use OSU tools like Box or Beav.es for file and link management. We also created new how-to videos to familiarize you with the website.
  • Outlined everyone’s content management roles, and how to count your web activities in Digital Measures. We also integrated your awards and publications from Digital Measures into your profiles.
  • Shared tips on sprucing up newsletters or catching the attention of web visitors. We also added tools or data-informed recommendations for improving content’s readability, accessibility and findability online.

When a change happens, there’s a lot of fluidity in roles with some people pitching in where needed. At a certain point into the transition, clarity is needed to outline current expectations and responsibilities. This helps working relationships and goals be more defined, and taps into the strengths and interests of each member of a group.

Last week we shared our new guide on working on the Extension website, and it included updated roles for all who are involved with the web project and the long-term digital strategy. These roles are shaped by the guiding criteria of the “right people doing the right things”.

Roles and Responsibilities

Focusing in on just a few responsibilities at a time may make the way forward more manageable. Some of the suggested focuses for 2019 are highlighted in “Getting Started with Content” in the new guide. Full roles and responsibilities are also outlined:

Everyone in a content team or program or county office group can learn how to add content to the website. The team or group can also designate a member to be “publishing editor” who does the entry or this assignment can rotate. There is flexibility in how the roles fit for your team or group (see the points of contact for each team or group).

Working on the website can be more effective when you meet as a group and discuss, for example, “How does your content address the questions being asked by your audiences?” This collaborative inquiry can make your content more engaging too.

EESC can facilitate interactive workshops for your team this year to define your website goals, plan your content strategy, or map out your process in making the roles fit for your team or group. Contact the web team with your ideas and requests.

Keeping content fresh, current, and accurate on the Extension website means knowing the tools to keep existing content maintained. In certain cases, you may want your content to be invisible to visitors if it becomes out of date. Or, you might want to review the content another person updated before it gets published.

There are three ways to make content unpublished:

  • Draft: The content needs to be finished/reviewed before it gets published.
  • In Review: The content was published, but has been taken down for review.
  • Archived: The content was published, but is now out of date or no longer needed.

At the bottom of any edit screen, you will see these options in a drop down field above the Save button.

You can also see the status of all content at a glance on your group’s list of content.

Note that if you “Edit” a piece of published content and set its state to “Draft”, the previous version of that content will remain visible. To hide all previous versions, set the state to “In Review” or “Archived” instead.

To see the public version of the content, click on “View” tab. To see the latest draft of the content, click on the “Latest version” tab. These tabs are visible below the title on the content’s page. You can also see a “Revisions” tab, where all the past published versions can be found and reverted back if needed.

When you save a piece of content, you can enter a “Revision log message” to describe the changes you made or why you made them. These messages get displayed in the Revisions tab.

It is recommended for educational content or annual events to “archive” rather than delete. Deleted content will no longer be accessible and cannot be restored. Archived content can still be found on the Group Content page when logged in if you want to update it and republish. It also helps avoid the content being inadvertently added again, since the reason it was “archived” can be noted in the revisions field for future reference.

Read more in the user guide under Managing Content. As you do some housekeeping of your group’s content, reach out to the web team if questions come up. Thanks for your work to keeping the quality of content reflecting the valuable service OSU Extension provides the broader community.

In 2018, Extension faculty were organized into content teams to populate the new Extension website. If you led the review of content from the county and program sites to see what to migrate or facilitated a discussion with your working groups about what content your audiences wanted, report your contributions and outcomes in Digital Measures.

To capture your effort in your P&T CV, document it in Digital Measures under “Other Assigned Duties.” While content you have authored, reviewed, or contributed to can be listed under “Publications,” on a content team you may provide more leadership that strengthens the group process. Here’s some suggested language that could be used; enter the steps that are appropriate to your experience.

The Other Assigned Duties screen looks like this:

screenshot described in text

 

Assignment Title:

Extension Website Content Team Leader or Extension Website Content Team Contributor

Description of issue/situation:

Because older program and county websites were going offline, existing web content was reviewed and if warranted, migrated to the new Extension content management system.

Content teams had opportunities to provide feedback to the Extension website, which was launched in phases. This step-wise launch permitted faculty to become trained in the new content management system and workflow processes.

Description of action taken:

As a content team leader, I convened team members so that we could “divide and conquer” the size of the job.  Content was reviewed for its suitability to today’s Extension audience and then entered on the new website. I coordinated workload with [student workers, research assistants, content team members, etc.] who assisted in content entry.

In addition, I facilitated communication with my teammates, the EESC web team, and with program area leaders to [request topic changes, curate content on the site, enter or review content on the website, tag content appropriately, identify missing content, suggest functionality or design changes, and coordinate or participate in trainings to learn the content management system]. This took approximately ____ hours.

Description of outcome or impact:

___ pieces of content were added and read by ___ visitors.  These requested features were added to website: ____ (Also include any impact statements from people in the community or clients who have benefited from the website content).

Inclusivity of this activity (optional):

Our content team’s content reached an audience under the age of 35, who made up ___% of all visitors to our group’s content.

All our content included subheading formats, alternative text of images, and clear writing to increase the access to its content for diverse audiences. When feasible, PDFs were also made into text articles for improved accessibility.

Scholarship:

https://extension.oregonstate.edu. (Also note whether faculty from other states indicated they had referenced various resources from the website.)

Start Date:

(This can just be the year if you don’t know the month)

End Date:

(Leave blank unless you have rotated off the content team)

There is the ability to link relevant publications, presentations and more to this kind of record. The EESC web team is also working on an analytics dashboard linked to content team group pages when logged into the the Extension website to quantify page and site traffic. Until then, you can contact the web team if you would like this information.