In this week’s issue:

 

Webinar tomorrow: Be Ready, Be Set, Go!

On April 28th at noon, we will host our fourth webinar on “Be Ready, Be Set, Go.” I hope you will help spread the word for that webinar too! Here are the details…

Title: Wildfire Wednesdays: Be Ready, Be Set, Go!

Date: April 28

Time: 12:00-1:00pm

Description: Wildfire evacuations are becoming a reality that individuals and communities throughout Oregon are face each fire season. Want to learn how you can prepare for evacuation from a wildfire? Join us as we hear from fire and emergency managers in Oregon about what you and your community can do to be the most prepared to evacuation from a wildfire. We will talk about where to get updates and information on wildfire evacuation, how to create a 72-hour bag, and what to consider when creating an evacuation plan including contingencies for children, the elderly, pets, and livestock.

Registration: https://oregonstate.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_vlJQw4n1Rgq3l38Ipdyy1g Register once for one or ALL webinars!

MailChimp flyer: https://mailchi.mp/oregonstate/bereadybesetgo

Professional Development Fund Application Deadline: May 1, 2021

The next quarterly deadline for Extension Professional Development Funds is May 1. Applications that will be considered must be submitted BEFORE the deadline and BEFORE the professional development opportunity. For more information, visit the fund webpage.

Nos gustaría saber si a usted le interesaría, y tiene disponibilidad de participar en una sesión de escucha en español

Nos gustaría saber si a usted le interesaría, y tiene disponibilidad de participar en una sesión de escucha en español con Ana Lucia Fonseca. Esta sesión es para todos los hispanos hablantes del sistema de Extension de OSU! Queremos saber su opinion acerca de que puede hacer la Administración para mejorar en tres temas: Gente, Ambiente de Trabajo y Acceso a programas. Esta sesión será el miércoles 28 de abril de 10 a 11 de la mañana. ¡Su opinión cuenta mucho! Por favor llene la encuesta antes del 30 de abril del 2021. Zoom: https://oregonstate.zoom.us/j/93904164275?pwd=NXlBRXVqTjk2MWpZelhSSTJGMFJpUT09

Professional Development Resources

Please check out the upcoming statewide professional development sessions, plenty of interesting sessions, past, present and future here.
Sessions for the next two weeks are:

Friday, May 7, 2021 @ 10:30 am: Ask Anita

Thursday, May 13, 2021 @ 12:00 pm: Extension Teaching Network (monthly meeting)

New Additions to OSU Extension Catalog

WEED, 2021 PNW Weed Management Handbook
Ed Peachey
Revised. This comprehensive guide to weed management in the Pacific Northwest covers biological weed control agents; pesticide safety and disposal; agrichemicals and their properties; and control of problem weeds. Sections include subjects such as weed control in cereal grain crops; grass seed crops; forage and seed crops; legumes; oils and fiber; corn; hops; potatoes; sugar beets; aquatics; forestry; orchards and vineyards; small fruits; vegetable crops; vegetable seed crops; Christmas trees; nursery, greenhouse, and bulb crops; professional landscape maintenance; turfgrass; home landscapes and gardens; pasture and rangeland; and noncropland and right-of-way.

FS 304, Cover Crops for Home Gardens has been removed from the catalog. Please refer clients to WSU publications:

  1. Cover Crops for Home Gardens West of the Cascades
  2. Cover Crops for Home Gardens East of the Cascades
  3. Successful Cover Crop Management in Your Home Garden

Extension News and Impact Stories

Producing news and impact stories is the No. 1 priority for the Extension Communications’ news team, as we help you share how Extension is actively serving communities. This story was published in the last week:

We encourage active sharing of this story across Extension’s social media accounts and inclusion in appropriate newsletters. We will include recently published stories in Extension ConnEXTion each week. Feel free to browse the Extension website news section and Our Impact site as well, for stories that are relevant to your communities.

Do you have a story that you want to share? Contact Chris Branam, Extension Communications’ news and public issues education leader, chris.branam@oregonstate.edu.

Navigator Digital Strategy Update

Communications to broaden your reach

Do you have a local initiative, new publication or program priority that could have statewide interest? This past quarter Extension Communications teamed up with others to coordinate such campaigns with good results.

Zebra mussels invasive species arrive in Oregon

    • Sea Grant wrote a web article, Master Gardeners did website and Instagram announcements, Extension Communications posted on Facebook and PACE shared in the gardening e-newsletter.
    • This helped to quickly get the word out with over 1000 website pageviews and 130 Facebook clicks and other engagements.

Livestream of chicks hatching over one week

    • Clatsop county worked with OSU IT and Extension Communications to get the webcam on YouTube and the campaign webpage set up, then did social media posts, news releases and other outreach statewide.
    • Over 5,400 pageviews with 44 minutes average watch time and 1000 clicks to explore other related resources.

Trees to Know in Oregon and Washington book launch

    • Extension Communications collaborated with PACE, ECTU, OSU University Press, the author and others across Extension to promote the new version of this book in newsletters, Facebook ads and a book launch webinar.
    • Over 15,000 pageviews of the campaign and catalog pages, more than 900 people registered for the book launch webinar, asked more than 400 questions upon registering and close to 1500 books sold so far. (Book sales raise funds for OSU Extension.)

Thank you to those who helped to get the word out in your communities by featuring these campaigns on your county web pages, on your social media or in your newsletters.

We also are hearing about successes led by programs in online webinar series from gardening to forestry. Please share these successes and other shout outs in Teams.

Do you have other ideas for statewide campaigns? Let’s talk.

Diversity Highlights

Please contact inclusive.outreach@oregonstate.edu with any questions, or suggestions for Diversity Highlights content.

Statewide Events & Resources

Cabildos Speaker Series presents: A ‘Common Spectacle of the Race’: Garveyism’s Visual Politics of Founding, a talk by Adom Getachew, Neubauer Family assistant professor of political science at the University of Chicago. She is a political theorist with research interests in the history of political thought, theories of race and empire, and postcolonial political theory. In July 1920, just a month before the first annual convention of the Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA), the association’s co-founder, Marcus Garvey, announced, “We are a new people, born out of a new day and new circumstance.” The convention, he argued, was a moment of political founding on the model of the Philadelphia Convention in 1787. This talk will examine the UNIA’s conception of political founding, with particular attention to central role of images, theatricality and performance. Wednesday, April 28 at 4 p.m. Register.

Trans Story Circles: Hosted by the HRWGC and the Pride Center. Happening Monday, May 3 from 5-7 p.m., for folx who identify within the trans umbrella to gather in a safe and brave space to share their stories and create connections. There is a mandatory Qualtrics form to participate: https://oregonstate.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_1ZGJFrP1Ckjq3cO.

OSU ADA30 Celebratory Symposium: Registration is open! The symposium is the culmination of a year-long celebration of the 30th Anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act at Oregon State University. This symposium combines poster and paper sessions with community-oriented workshops and facilitated discussions to create opportunities for dialogue across spheres of experience. This is a digital event that will be held on Zoom May 4-27. This symposium is free and open to the public, but registration is required. Visit the OSU ADA30 Blog for more information about symposium accessibility, registration and sessions.

DEI In the News

OSU to recognize Juneteenth as a university holiday (KTVZ)
Oregon State University said Friday it will recognize Juneteenth as a university holiday on June 18, underscoring the university’s commitment to leading change and dismantling systemic racism. (see also The Skanner)

Report: Faculty Diversity Falling Behind Student Diversity (Diverse Edu)
Rates of underrepresented faculty in higher education have not been keeping up with the increasingly diversifying student demographics, according to a new report from the Southern Regional Education Board (SREB).

Extension in the News

Gale Gingrich, longtime ag researcher and extension agent, dies at 77
Capital Press
Gale Gingrich, a retired Oregon State University Extension agent who spent the last 15 years with Marion Ag Service, has died. He was 77.

LeCocq: OSU Extension Services is educating Oregonians about COVID-19 vaccine access, listen to them
The Daily Barometer
One group working to clarify information about COVID-19 and vaccines for Oregonians is the Oregon State University Extension Services.

Burning to protect and restore forest
The Nugget
While it makes citizens nervous to see the Forest Service burning on days with wind, the fires are fully staffed with wildland firefighting crews. And wind is actually essential to doing the work effectively, according to Oregon State University Extension Service Regional Fire Specialist Ariel Cowan.

Blue Mountain Land Trust sets virtual film dates
Walla Walla Union-Bulletin
Panel conversation will be moderated by Oregon State University Extension Forester John Punches.

Getting started with digital mapping tools
The News-Review
A column by Alicia Christiansen.

In this week’s issue:

OSU Extension vaccination outreach and education updates

We Want to Hear From You

Be on the lookout for a request to complete a Qualtrics Survey of 10 short questions related to what you are hearing in your counties related to gaps/barriers to fuller vaccination, what you might be doing, and additional resources you may need to do that work more successfully.

Update of Vaccine Lower Among Older Adults in Seven Counties

With the state’s average vaccination rate at 70% for those over 65, seven counties have less than 50% uptake for older adults: Douglas, Gillam, Grant, Lake, Malheur, Morrow and Umatilla. The Oregon Health Authority thinks this is due to vaccine hesitancy, not access, and suggests we have more work to do to help people over the hump of vaccine hesitancy.

These counties are performing better than the average: Benton, Deschutes, Hood River, Lane, Lincoln, Multnomah, Polk and Tillamook.

Vaccine Eligibility

All individuals 16 and older in Phase 2 are eligible to be vaccinated for COVID-19 in Oregon, joining individuals in Phases 1A and 1B, groups 1-7. The Oregon Health Authority has a Get Vaccinated Oregon tool that helps you create an account and find a vaccination provider when you are eligible to receive a vaccine.

What’s Different for 16- and 17-Year-Olds

  • Pfizer is the only vaccine that is authorized by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use by people under the age of 18.
  • Sixteen and 17-year-olds should look for appointments in locations that have access to the Pfizer vaccine.
  • VaccineFinder.org allows you to search for locations that provide the Pfizer vaccine. Not all vaccine websites tell you what kind of vaccine is available. OHA is working to increase information about the type of vaccine that’s available.
  • There are some areas of the state where the Pfizer vaccine isn’t readily available. OHA is working to expand the availability of Pfizer throughout the state.
  • Under Oregon law, minors 15 and older may give consent to medical treatment, including vaccinations, provided by a physician, physician assistant, naturopath, nurse practitioner, dentist or optometrist, or others operating under the license of these providers, without the consent of a parent or guardian.
  • Most locations where COVID-19 vaccinations are provided have oversight by a medical provider who would meet the definition of the provider types listed above, and therefore consent of a parent or guardian shouldn’t be required for a 16- or 17-year-old who wishes to get the Pfizer vaccine. Providers administering COVID-19 vaccinations to 16- or 17-year-old people should make it clear at the time a vaccine appointment is made whether consent from a parent or guardian will be required.
  • The vaccine is free. You don’t need to have insurance to use it. If you do have insurance, you may be asked for an insurance card so that an administration fee can be billed to the insurance company.
  • You don’t need to bring proof of eligibility, identification, social security number or health insurance. Vaccine providers may ask if you live in Oregon or what kind of work you do.

For more information on vaccination for 16 and 17-year-old people, see the FAQ on OHA’s webpage.

About the Get Vaccinated Oregon (GVO) Tool

  • The GVO no longer accepts landline phone numbers as a method of contact. Using these automated calls as a response for the GVO was confusing to landline users who have been warned by the Oregon Department of Justice to be careful of automated calls. (For more on COVID-19 fraud schemes, consult this guidance from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General).
  • Anyone who registered for the GVO tool with a landline will be contacted for support with vaccine access. Many of those who registered in the GVO with a landline registered through 211. Anyone whose preferred method of contact is a landline can continue to call 211 for support in accessing vaccine (or toll free, 1-866-698-6155 or TTY dial 711 and 1-866-698-6155).

No Documentation Needed

It’s important to share these facts with your communities:

We’ve learned that some providers are asking for documentation at the time of vaccination. This isn’t allowed. While a request for your insurance provider is permissible, you don’t have to share that information nor need to be insured to receive the free vaccine. If you have insurance, the insurance company can be charged for the visit fee. For those who have insurance you may be asked to provide the name of the insurance company so they can be billed for that visit.

If you need support or information on resources for help you can call the Safe + Strong Helpline: 1-800-923-HELP (4357).

Information on documentation and cost of the vaccine has been added in English and Spanish on the OSU Extension COVID-19 topic page.

Pause in Johnson & Johnson Vaccine Continues

The Oregon Health Authority has asked all of the state’s vaccine providers to immediately stop administering the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, per the announcement from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Federal Drug Administration. This is out of an abundance of caution as they review a handful of cases of a rare and severe type of blood clot in women ages 18-48 after vaccination with the Johnson & Johnson vaccine.

Cleaning and Disinfecting Your Facility

Another resource added to the COVID-19 topic page describes CDC guidelines on when disinfectant cleaning is needed and when soap/detergent and water will suffice.

Case Counts Rise Across the State

In the latest Oregon COVID-19 update on April 16, it was shared that daily cases of COVID-19 have more than doubled in just over a month.

  • Over the previous two days, OHA reported 1,576 new cases, the highest two-day total since early February.
  • The largest increased illnesses in Oregon are in people in their 20s.
  • The second biggest increase is in people in their 30s.
  • According to the CDC, hospitals around the U.S. are seeing more people in their 30s and 40s who have been admitted with severe cases as the virus continues to mutate.
  • Much of the spread we’re seeing in Oregon has been caused by large social gatherings where people aren’t physically distanced and aren’t wearing masks.
    • A multi-night karaoke event led to 36 cases, three hospitalizations and one death.
    • An indoor concert at a small music venue resulted in 15 cases.
    • All 10 people who attended a backyard gathering fell ill.

Please encourage those whom you speak with to stay safe.

In Memoriam

Gale Gingrich passed away Saturday night. He was the Marion County Field Crops Specialist until 2004.

Upcoming Wildfire Webinars

Jacob Powell, General Ag Extension Agent for Wasco / Sherman Counties is putting on a series of wildfire webinars for Ag communities coming up during May, which is National Wildfire Awareness Month. The first webinar is April 27th from noon to 1 pm on Wildfire Defensible Space for the Farm and Ranch, you can register here: https://beav.es/J9w

Additional webinars, also from noon to 1 pm include:

Livestock Evacuation during Wildfires – May 11, register here: https://beav.es/34E

Beat the “cheat”: dealing with cheatgrass – May 18, register here: https://beav.es/34a

Mitigating Wildfire Risk through Grazing and Taking an Inventory – May 25, register here: https://beav.es/34R

Branded Extension Zoom backgrounds are now available

Branded OSU Extension Zoom backgrounds – mostly land, garden and seascapes – are now available for downloading in the “Marketing Templates, Tools and Inspiration/Ready-to-Use” Box folder (you will need to be logged in). Several of the backgrounds also include the 4-H emblem or Sea Grant logo. If you have suggestions for additional designs, please contact Ann Marie Murphy.

Professional Development Resources

Please check out the upcoming statewide professional development sessions, plenty of interesting sessions, past, present and future here.
There are currently no sessions planned for the next two weeks.

Digital marketing series – Going live on Instagram

Jen Rouse from University Housing and Dining Services will host a conversation on April 23 at 2 p.m. about going live on Instagram. Jen will share examples of what UHDS has done over the last few years and some of the tricks they have picked up along the way. The monthly sessions in the digital marketing series are intended to be low stress and opportunities for us to learn from each other. You don’t need to register in advance and can find the link to the Zoom session, at any time, on the series page.

Extension News and Impact Stories

Producing news and impact stories is the No. 1 priority for the Extension Communications’ news team, as we help you share how Extension is actively serving communities. This story was published in the last week:

We encourage active sharing of this story across Extension’s social media accounts and inclusion in appropriate newsletters. We will include recently published stories in Extension ConnEXTion each week. Feel free to browse the Extension website news section and Our Impact site as well, for stories that are relevant to your communities.

Do you have a story that you want to share? Contact Chris Branam, Extension Communications’ news and public issues education leader, chris.branam@oregonstate.edu.

Navigator Digital Strategy Update

Thank you so much to the Extension faculty and staff who updated your web images to include the necessary photo credits. By the April 15 deadline your efforts led to 1200+ updated images!

Did you know that you can reuse images on the website or mark images not for reuse?

To reuse an existing image – search by keyword, title or filename – instead of uploading a new one.

When you find it, click the checkbox next to it. Then click the “Select” button at the bottom of the window.

Next, check if the image you want to reuse has a photo credit or if the caption it has works for your content.

 

If not, “remove” and select another image to reuse. When all set, save the page for the selection to take effect.

The web team will be cleaning up duplicate uploaded images for those who didn’t know about this “reuse” feature in the past. This will make it easier when browsing all the images in the future.

Finally, if you decide to upload a new image, you can select the don’t allow reuse checkbox before saving. This prevents others from using the image in other places. Use this if there are limited permissions to use the image.

Learn more about using images on the website.

Diversity Highlights

Please contact inclusive.outreach@oregonstate.edu with any questions, or suggestions for Diversity Highlights content.

Statewide Events & Resources

Combating bullying and anti-LGBTQ attitudes in sports: April 21 Webcast
Former Beaver, NFL defensive tackle and LGBTQ advocate Esera Tuaolo believes in a more inclusive and diverse world of sports — from pro football to youth athletics programs. Hear about his personal challenges during a successful nine-season NFL career and about his anti-bullying work and education delivered through his nonprofit, Hate is Wrong. Join College of Liberal Arts Professor Susan Shaw in conversation with Tuaolo on April 21 at 5 p.m. PT. Register at osualum.com/Changemakers.

Show Me Your Colors: Sexual Violence & Its Impacts On LGBTQ+ Men: April 22 at 6 p.m. This event will focus on the lived experiences of men and men-adjacent people who are LGBTQ+ and survivors of sexual assault. We will be discussing the impacts of sexual violence on men and men-adjacent folks, as well as the sexualization of people across the LGBTQ+ spectrum. Register here.

Demonstrating a Culture of Care: Join us as we explain the meaning of a Culture of Care and share the resources at OSU that are available to employees and supervisors to demonstrate a culture of caring and support. This session is geared toward university employees and supervisors. Part of the Spring 2021 FYI Friday series: Friday April 23, 10-10:30 a.m. via Zoom. Registration required.

DEI In the News

OSU study: Rural-urban divide compounds racial disparities in COVID-19 deaths (KTVZ)
While Black, Hispanic, Latino, Indigenous, Asian and Pacific Islander people are more likely to die of COVID-19 than white people nationwide, a recent study from Oregon State University found the risk was even greater for racial and ethnic minority groups living in rural areas, compared with urban areas.

Working to bring equity, understanding to vaccination process (Unsung Heroes)
Oregon pharmacies are better equipped to bring empathy, equity, and effectiveness to the COVID-19 vaccination process and Latinx patients thanks to Oregon State University third-year pharmacy student Daniela Olivas Shaw.

Extension in the News

Starlings in Oregon are an invasive pest to some, a fascinating species facing ‘bio bigotry’ to others
The Register-Guard
On farms, starlings are most noticeable among the pest birds, said Jenifer Cruikshank, who works for the Oregon State University Extension Service focusing on dairy farms.

Mid-Willamette Valley Food Trail
Corvallis Gazette-Times
Proximity to Corvallis was a must because of the cooperative work Mason does with Oregon State University’s Extension Service.

Biological control of invasive weeds in pastures: A primer
Western Farmer-Stockman
Shelby Filley, Professor, PhD, PAS (Oregon State University Extension, Douglas County Regional Livestock & Forages Specialist) says some of the “bugs” that feed on a certain weed may already be there but we don’t notice them.

Prevention: Reaping the healthy benefits of gardening
The Register-Guard
You can also find lots of resources online, in books or by contacting Oregon State University Extension Service master gardeners.

Growing a garden correctly
Curry Coastal Pilot
Growing your own vegetable garden might seem like a daunting task, but with these tips and tricks from Oregon State University Extension Service, your homegrown carrots and tomatoes will be the talk of the neighborhood.

Interview: Author ‘Eileen Garvin’ Talks Her Debut Novel The Music Of Bees

Red Carpet Crash
I’m currently enrolled in the Master Beekeeper Apprentice Program with the Oregon State University Extension Service.

Douglas County School Garden Hub
The News=Review
This role is housed at Douglas County OSU Extension Service and serves any school or organization in the county who is interested in a school garden.

Warnock: Proper livestock handling a powerful tool
Capital Press
A team of experienced educators, led by Chris Schachtschneider, Oregon State University Extension range and livestock specialist, conducted the workshop.

Associate professor studies historical landscapes to prepare for future
Nevada Today
She is hoping to start a project in collaboration with her colleagues in Extension and Oregon State University to gather and distribute information to ranch owners to ensure they are prepared for rangeland fires.

In this week’s issue:

OSU Extension vaccination outreach and education updates

Starting April 19, all individuals 16 and older in Phase 2 are eligible to be vaccinated in Oregon. Individuals in Phases 1A and 1B, groups 1-7 are currently eligible to be vaccinated for COVID-19. The Oregon Health Authority has a Get Vaccinted Oregon tool that helps you create an account and find a vaccination provider when you are eligible to receive a vaccine.

Pause in Johnson & Johnson Vaccine

This morning, the Oregon Health Authority has asked all of the state’s vaccine providers to immediately stop administering the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, per the announcement from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Federal Drug Administration. This is out of an abundance of caution as they review six cases of a rare and severe type of blood clot in women ages 18-48 after vaccination with the Johnson & Johnson vaccine.

About the Get Vaccinated Oregon (GVO) Tool

  • The GVO no longer accepts landline phone numbers as a method of contact. Using these automated calls as a response for the GVO was confusing to landline users who have been warned by the Oregon Department of Justice to be careful of automated calls. (For more on COVID-19 fraud schemes, consult this guidance from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General).
  • Anyone who registered for the GVO tool with a landline will be contacted for support with vaccine access. Many of those who registered in the GVO with a landline registered through 211. Anyone whose preferred method of contact is a landline can continue to call 211 for support in accessing vaccine (or toll free, 1-866-698-6155 or TTY dial 711 and 1-866-698-6155).

No Documentation Needed

  • All eligible individuals in Oregon can get the vaccine.
  • You don’t need to have identification.
  • You don’t need to be a U.S. citizen.
  • Getting the vaccine will not affect your immigration status or count as a public charge.
  • You don’t need to have or provide a Social Security number.
  • If you need support or information on resources for help you can call the Safe + Strong Helpline: 1-800-923-HELP(4357).

Vaccines Are Free

The vaccine will be given to everyone for free. The dose is paid for by the federal government and you cannot be charged a visit fee. However, if you have insurance, the insurance company can be charged for the visit fee.  Therefore, for those who have insurance you may be asked to provide the name of the insurance company so they can be billed for that visit.

County Risk Levels

As vaccinations increase, case counts and percent positivity won’t be adequate indicators on their own for measuring the threat COVID-19 poses to public health. Oregon is adding a statewide hospitalization metric for Extreme Riisk counties.

Beginning this week, for counties to move to – or remain in – Extreme Risk, they must meet the county metrics for case rates and percent positivity, plus COVID-19 positive patients occupying 300 hospital beds or more, and a 15% increase in the seven-day average of hospitalizations over the past week.

Counties that meet the criteria for Extreme Risk but not for the statewide trigger will be assigned to High Risk. This week there are three counties that qualify for Extreme Risk based on their county metrics, but are assigned High Risk because the statewide trigger has not been met: Josephine, Klamath, and Tillamook.

The first week’s data will provide a “warning week” to prepare counties for potential risk level changes. The next assignment of risk levels will be announced April 20 and take effect April 23.

Updates to Warning Week data and county risk levels will be posted to coronavirus.oregon.gov.

Disinfectant Cleaning Not As Important As Originally Thought

The CDC has issued new guidelines that suggest cleaning with soap or detergent and water will suffice in killing the virus. Disinfectant cleaning isn’t needed.  Soap/detergent and water suffice. According to a recent article in The New York Times, money for COVID-19 prevention in shared facilities, excluding health care, is better spent on securing air filtration systems.

“This should be the end of deep cleaning,” said Dr. Joseph Allen, a building safety expert at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, noting that the misplaced focus on surfaces has had real costs. “It has led to closed playgrounds, it has led to taking nets off basketball courts, it has led to quarantining books in the library. It has led to entire missed school days for deep cleaning. It has led to not being able to share a pencil. So that’s all that hygiene theater, and it’s a direct result of not properly classifying surface transmission as low risk.”

Breakthrough Cases

There has been a very low rate of “breakthrough” cases – instances in which an individual received a positive COVID-19 test result at least 14 days after the final dose of their respective COVID-19 vaccine. At best the vaccines are only 95% effective so wearing face coverings, social distancing and handwashing still matter. On April 8, the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) announced that it had identified 168 COVID-19 vaccine breakthrough cases in Oregon through April 2, including three deaths.

First Monday Update

In case you missed it! First Monday Up is about statewide mental health first aid initiative. Check it out here.

Professional Development Resources

Please check out the upcoming statewide professional development sessions, plenty of interesting sessions, past, present and future here.
Sessions for the next two weeks are:

Thursday, April 15, 2021 @ 10:00 am: Extension communications, informational technology and noncredit education: Orientation and refresher

Friday, April 16, 2021 @ 10:30 am: Ask Anita

New Additions to OSU Extension Catalog

EM 9155, How to Control Slugs in Your Garden/Cómo Controlar a las Babosas en su Jardín
Neil Bell, Amy J. Dreves
Revised (Replaces EC 1536-S). Practical tips on how to deal with slugs in your garden, given in both English and Spanish.

Consejos prácticos sobre como tratar las babosas en su jardín, dados en inglés y español.

Extension News and Impact Stories

Producing news and impact stories is the No. 1 priority for the Extension Communications’ news team, as we help you share how Extension is actively serving communities. These stories were published in the last week:

We encourage active sharing of these stories across Extension’s social media accounts and inclusion in appropriate newsletters. We will include recently published stories in Extension ConnEXTion each week. Feel free to browse the Extension website news section and Our Impact site as well, for stories that are relevant to your communities.

Do you have a story that you want to share? Contact Chris Branam, Extension Communications’ news and public issues education leader, chris.branam@oregonstate.edu.

Navigator Digital Strategy Update

Effective writing for easier reading

Plain language for me has been one of the most humbling and aspiring components of my career in recent years,” says Weston Miller, Community Horticulturist for Extension in the Portland metro area. “It’s been about stepping aside from my own beliefs in how content should be written – looking at it from the eyes of the reader and adapting the content.”

The average American reads at the 7th or 8th grade reading levels. So, it’s best we write in the clearest, simplest way possible to reach all people. “If people hit a wall of text, it’s probably not going to go very well. They are probably not going to get the information they need,” says Weston. Also, adding icons or photos can help show and reinforce your message.

In this recording, Weston (12:22-20:45) and Janet Donnelly (6:30-12:20) from Extension Communications show how to quickly break up a densely written paragraph to make it plain language. And they share tools you can use to check final reading level.

Start your plain language editing by taking 5 minutes to focus on:

  • Shorter words
  • Shorter sentences
  • Shorter paragraphs

Then learn more plain language tips on the Virtual Extension employee intranet.

Diversity Highlights

TONIGHT! BIPOC in STEM Career Conversation: The College of Science BIPOC student group is hosting a discussion with BIPOC STEM professionals on Tuesday, April 13 at 5 p.m. Kim Tran from Integrity Bio, Dawn Wright from Esri, Jacob Benson III from Innovator Semiconductor Solutions and Shaznin Daruwalla from CAPS join us for a 30-minute student Q&A followed by breakout sessions.

Provost’s Lecture Featuring Ibram X. Kendi, National Book Award Winner, Historian and Leading Anti-Racist Voice in America
Oregon State University invites you to join a virtual event on Wednesday, April 14, featuring Ibram X. Kendi – National Book Award Winner (2019), Guggenheim Fellow, historian, three-time NY Times best selling author and journalist. Kendi is the Andrew W. Mellon Professor in the Humanities at Boston University, and the founding director of the BU Center for Antiracist Research for a conversation about How To Be an Anti-Racist. Register here.

Registration now open for the OSU ADA 30th Anniversary Symposium
The ADA30 Celebratory Symposium is the culmination of Oregon State University’s year-long celebration of the 30thanniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act. This symposium combines poster and paper sessions with community-oriented workshops and facilitated discussions to create opportunities for dialogue across spheres of experience. Rather than holding a conventional conference in a shorter (1- or 2-day) timeframe, the symposium aims to increase accessibility and reduce “Zoom burnout” by spreading out sessions over the entire month of May.

Call for Applications – Inclusive Excellence@OSU 2021 Cohort: Each year IE@OSU welcomes STEM faculty from OSU, Linn-Benton and Lane Community Colleges to participate in a yearlong fellowship. Inclusive Excellence@OSU seeks to transform STEM education by creating a thriving community of peers who are invested in inclusive excellence in STEM, challenging fellows to develop equity and justice-oriented mindsets and exploring pedagogical practices that fellows can implement in their own classrooms. Click here for application and more info. Deadline to apply is May 3.

DEI In the News

Why we need new benchmarks for AI (Wall Street Journal)
“The focus of all AI development was all on accuracy, especially when it came to benchmarks,” says Youjin Kong, an associate visiting professor of philosophy at Oregon State University who works on ethics and social philosophy in AI. “But what’s the purpose of competition to increase accuracy if the data set itself is biased?” (OSU faculty, staff and students can access the WSJ for free from the OSU Libraries website)

Chief Diversity Officers Play Critical Role in Effecting Lasting Change on Campus (Diverse Edu)
“In many places, the conversation starts with reexamining the role of the chief diversity officer, who is often charged with helping institutions develop “cultural competency and expand the social bandwidth of their respective institutions,” says Elizabeth Moore, interim chief diversity officer at Gallaudet University.”

Extension in the News

Everyday People: An avid gardener helps others grow
The Astorian
Wentzel is the new master gardener and small-farms program coordinator on the coast for the Oregon State University Extension Service.

Fact check: Bell peppers do not have a gender; false claim based on number of lobes is a myth
USA Today
“The bumps or lack thereof are primarily related to the variety and growing conditions,” according to the Oregon State University Extension Service. 

Garden Plots
The Chronicle
A column by Chip Bubl.

Through the Eyes of an Elder: Staying strong — and connected
Hood River News
Locally, a national program called Strong Women/Strong People (developed by Tufts University, designed for people middle-aged and older, and supported by Oregon State University Extension) has been the answer for many older adults seeking a way to exercise safely in a non-competitive setting.

Oregon State University looks to help address mental health in farming, ranching
RFD-TV
“I think there is a perception that if you’re struggling with those sorts of problems, it’s maybe a character flaw,” OSU’s Cassie Bouska states. “I would encourage people to take a step back and realize that mental health problems like chronic depression, anxiety, things like that can actually be, I would consider them like an illness. I just think of it as having the flu basically, you’re not feeling well.”

In this week’s issue:

Professional Development Fund

Next Application Deadline — May 1, 2021

The next quarterly deadline for Extension Professional Development Funds is May 1st. Applications that will be considered must be submitted BEFORE the deadline and BEFORE the professional development opportunity.

  • “Growing the Endowment Fund”

Extension faculty and staff may help “GROW the Fund” at any time during the year. Keep the following in mind:

  • The principal of the OSU Extension Professional Development Fund is an endowment.
  • The earnings from the endowment feeds into the current-use-fund.
  • Each quarter, the amount in the current-use-fund pays for the professional development requests selected for funding.
  • The fund supports on average, about 100-160 different professional development opportunities a year.
  • Exciting Update related to the amount currently in the endowment!

The two ways individuals may currently contribute throughout the year are:

  • Through payroll deduction (deductions could range from $5.00 a month to any larger amount)
  • Through individual contributions (payable by check or credit card)
  • Either of these types of contributions may be processed on-line through the OSU Foundation at: http://www.osufoundation.org/s/359/foundation/index.aspx?sid=359&gid=34&pgid=4353
  • Contributions may be made to the endowment as you complete the on-line process. Be sure to note the following information when completing the on-line process section called Gift Information (where it asks which program you would like your gift to support—please enter the following number and fund name): 6220-820450 OSU Extension Professional Development Fund.

New Employees and New Positions

Teagan Moran, Benton, Ag Small Farms Coordinator (Promotion)

Maria Zamora Re, Campus, Biological & Ecological Engineering Extension, Assistant Professor-Water Irrigation

In Memoriam

In 1967, Lloyd Wayne Martin began working in Corvallis, Oregon as Extension Specialist for Oregon State University.  In 1970, Lloyd moved to Canby, Oregon and worked as Superintendent of North Willamette Experiment Station in Aurora until 1992. Obituary is here.

Professional Development Resources

Please check out the upcoming statewide professional development sessions, plenty of interesting sessions, past, present and future here.
Sessions for the next two weeks are:

Thursday, April 8 2021 @ 12:00 pm: Extension Teaching Network

Friday, April 9 2021 @ 10:00 am: Child Abuse Prevention in Youth Programs Webinar

Thursday, April 15 2021 @ 10:00 am: Extension communications, informational technology and noncredit education: Orientation and refresher

Extension News and Impact Stories

Producing news and impact stories is the No. 1 priority for the Extension Communications’ news team, as we help you share how Extension is actively serving communities. These stories were published in the last week:

We encourage active sharing of these stories across Extension’s social media accounts and inclusion in appropriate newsletters. We will include recently published stories in Extension ConnEXTion each week. Feel free to browse the Extension website news section and Our Impact site as well, for stories that are relevant to your communities.

Do you have a story that you want to share? Contact Chris Branam, Extension Communications’ news and public issues education leader, chris.branam@oregonstate.edu.

Navigator Digital Strategy Update

Creating buzz with content marketing

All of us produce content for the Extension website and other outlets, but we don’t always promote that content. This six-minute recording shows you how to build interest in your work.

Enhancing Urban and Suburban Landscapes to Protect Pollinators (EM9281) came out in June 2020, and recently earned a silver award from the national Association of Communication Excellence. How did we make sure this excellent information got noticed?

By dividing this 41-page publication into easier to read chunks, we could create infographics or short videos to promote and share with partners and during National Pollinator Week.

Here’s a pretty simple idea. Take a snapshot of just a portion of beautiful two-page table spread and post on Facebook. This reached 31,000 people and 4,065 liked or shared that content.

Another bee graphic faculty developed for the publication turned into a short “5 common bees in Oregon” video to share on the web and social media. The video provides educational content, but also is entertaining. It reached 17,000 people and had 5,800 views (and you all helped share that further).

Our takeaways – promote your work. Don’t quit once you have that PDF in your hands. Reach out to other people to help share it. And repurpose that content online by using key pieces to engage audiences. Learn more in this six-minute professional development webinar.

Want to explore your ideas directly with Extension Communications, ECTU and PACE? Join us on April 15 at 10 am for an orientation and refresher conversation.

Diversity Highlights

Please contact inclusive.outreach@oregonstate.edu with any questions, or suggestions for Diversity Highlights content.

Statewide Events & Resources

WorldOregon Speaker Series: The Office of Global affairs has announced the last of the lineup for the 21st Annual International Speaker Series, streaming live online. This year’s theme: Changing Course. Tom Colicchio, acclaimed restauranteur and Top Chef lead judge, is featured on Wednesday, April 7 with “Hunger, Food, & Human Rights.” To attend one of these events, or for questions, email the Office of Global Affairs.

OMSI-OSU Virtual Workshop: “How to communicate about controversial issues”: Thursday, April 8, 3-4:30 p.m., “Controversial Subjects: Don’t avoid tackling controversial issues anymore.” Participants will learn and practice strategies for writing and talking about controversial topics in a productive and hopeful way. Subjects include: framing, the power of metaphor, explanatory chains and solutions. Registration closes April 6. Register/learn more at: https://omsi.edu/science-communication-services.

Kognito: Recognizing and Supporting Students in Distress Training for Staff, Faculty and Student Assistants: Students today face increasing pressures that can lead to emotional distress, depression, anxiety, substance abuse and even thoughts of suicide. This is never more true than now with the additional stressors of police brutality, racism and a global pandemic. Visit beav.es/Zzp to access the faculty/staff online training so you can recognize and support OSU students in distress. Student assistants should visit: beav.es/ZD3. For questions contact Tessie Webster-Henry: tess.websterhenry@oregonstate.edu

DEI In the News

Portland residents create Black Resilience Fund to meet local need (OPB)
“the organization is committed to a minimal screening process, without requiring extensive paperwork or proof of income in the form of paystubs, eviction papers or bank statements. Black Portlanders, Whitten says, have long been in crisis.”

Making Higher Education A Possibility For All – An Interview with Chancellor Eloy Ortiz Oakley (Divere Edu)
“Growing up in Southeast Los Angeles, Chancellor Eloy Ortiz Oakley never thought that the struggles he had faced and overcome in his youth would bring him on a path to leading the largest college system in the country. As the 2021 recipient of the Diverse Champions Award, Oakley joins us in this episode to talk about his approach to diversity, equity, and inclusion issues in higher education.”

Extension in the News

OSU’s FRSAN Looking To Address Growing Problem Of Mental Health In Farming Community
Pacific Northwest Ag Network
OSU Extension’s Cassie Bouska said currently there’s a stigma associated with mental health in the farming community that needs to be overcome.

States Are Growing Fewer Trees. Forest Owners Say That’s a Problem.
Pew Charitable Trusts
“We’re scratching our heads over this trying to address the need from the fire,” said Glenn Ahrens, a forester with the Oregon State University extension service.

Lane County garden resources: A primer and a planner for planting season
The Register-Guard
“It’s definitely good to do a little research as to timing, bed prep, when and how to fertilize,” OSU Commercial and Community Horticulture specialist Erica Chernoh said. “There’s a lot of information available.”

Clackamas County Fairgrounds hosts drive-thru inoculations
Volunteers from the Oregon State University Extension Service helped guide a steady stream of cars and pedestrians through the process.

OSU Extension Offers Regular Fire Season Preps
Jefferson Public Radio
Oregon State University’s Extension Service is getting a head start, offering “Fire Aware. Fire Prepared” webinars on alternate Wednesdays through the spring.

Why More Gardeners are Starting to Grow Native Plants
Greenhouse Grower sat down with Gail Langellotto, professor of horticulture at Oregon State University, to see why native plants and pollinators have begun to trend with gardeners.

If You’re New Here: Gardening In The High Desert 
The Source Weekly
Oregon State University Extension Service in Deschutes County has a host of resources designed to help people grow and preserve food, including its “Growing Vegetables in Central Oregon” video class, a one-hour tutorial.

Gardening trivia returns at the Klamath County Library
Herald and News
Nicole Sanchez – an assistant professor in horticulture at the extension center and a favorite recurring guest speaker at the library – will test trivia skills in a variety of topics on Thursday, April 15, with a focus on cold season vegetables; and Thursday, April 29, with a focus on warm season vegetables; both at 7 p.m.

In this week’s issue:

OSU Extension vaccination outreach and education updates

Letters to the editor in your local or regional newspaper are a great way to reach a large audience with your message. Generally, letters to the editor are short (150-200 words) and respond to an article in the paper or a current news event. This template encouraging COVID-19 vaccinations can be used as a jumping off point for a positive, solution-focused letter. Personalize it and make it your own or share with partners who may want to do the same. The template has been added to the COVID-19 communication toolkit and templates on the COVID-19 resources page for OSU Extension employees.

The Oregon Health Authority announced on Friday that Oregon’s vaccine eligibility timeline is being moved up. Group 7 will be eligible for vaccination starting April 5. Group 7 includes frontline workers, people ages 16 to 44 with underlying conditions and people living in multigenerational homes.

Also on Friday, OHA also announced changes to its vaccination tools:

  • All vaccination registrations and notifications will be handled through the Get Vaccinated Oregon (GVO) tool.
  • The GVO tool no longer accepts landline phone numbers as a method of contact. Using these automated calls as a response for the GVO was confusing to landline users who have been warned by the Oregon Department of Justice to be careful of automated calls. (For more on COVID-19 fraud schemes, consult this guidance from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General).
  • There are approximately 200 people in the GVO who registered with a landline as their primary contact and no other way to contact them. In addition, approximately 300 people provided a landline and some other form of contact.
  • Anyone who registered for the GVO with a landline will be contacted for support with vaccine access. Many of those who registered in the GVO with a landline registered through 211. Anyone whose preferred method of contact is a landline can continue to call 211 for support in accessing vaccine (or toll free, 1-866-698-6155 or TTY dial 711 and 1-866-698-6155).

Finally, nationwide, white Republicans are more hesitant about getting the COVID-19 vaccine than any other demographic group. OPB’s Think Out Loud discussed the topic with Malheur County Health Department Director Sarah Poe and Chunhuei Chi, professor and director of the Center for Global Health at Oregon State University.

New Publishing Project Request Process

Starting in April, Extension Communications is changing its process for submitting project requests to its Extension Catalog publishing team.

Going forward, we ask that authors wait to submit project requests until their materials have been peer reviewed and are ready to submit.

We are also asking program leaders to confirm the project is approved and has been peer reviewed before we begin work on it. (In the past, program leaders received only a courtesy notification when project requests were submitted.)

How it will work:

When an author submits a project request to Extension Communications, the appropriate program leader will automatically receive an email alerting them to the submission. If the project has been approved and peer-reviewed, the program leader will notify Extension Communications and we will assign a project manager. The project manager will contact the corresponding author with details on how to submit project materials and an estimate of when we are able to start work on the project.

If the program leader does not confirm their approval and indicate that the peer review has been completed, a project manager will not be assigned and work on the project cannot start.

These changes are necessary due to an increase in both the volume and scope of the project requests we have received over the last two years. The workload for our publishing managers has doubled since 2019, and these changes will make our process more efficient.

The changes will also allow us to give authors more precise timetables for completing their publishing projects. We still encourage authors to contact us anytime to discuss an upcoming or potential project. Just contact Sandy Reichhuber, and she’ll arrange for you to talk with a publishing manager.

Thanks for your support in helping us with this essential part of Extension’s work in Oregon. If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to contact Publishing Leader Jim Sloan.

Professional Development Resources

Please check out the upcoming statewide professional development sessions, plenty of interesting sessions, past, present and future here.
Sessions for the next two weeks are:

Friday, April 2 2021 @ 10:30 am: Ask Anita

Thursday, April 8 2021 @ 12:00 pm: Extension Teaching Network (monthly meeting)

Friday, April 9 2021 @ 10:00 am: Child Abuse Prevention in Youth Programs Webinar

New Additions to OSU Extension Catalog

EM 8840, Phytophthora ramorum: A Guide for Oregon Nurseries
Hazel Daniels, Jennifer Parke, Jay W. Pscheidt, Chris Benemann
Revised. The funguslike organism Phytophthora ramorum has been causing severe plant disease problems for nurseries and homeowners in California and, now, in Oregon and Washington. This guide helps wholesale nursery personnel identify possible P. ramorum infections and advises on managing them.

EM 9312, Pest Alert: Spotted Lanternfly is an Invasive Insect That May Impact Oregon
Serhan Mermer, Gabriella Tait, Josh Vlach, Jana Lee, Man-Yeon Choi, Heather Leach, Linda J. Brewer, Vaughn M. Walton
New. Spotted Lanternfly has a broad range of plant hosts, including grape, stone fruits, apple, ornamental species, maple, black walnut, willow and rose. Nymphs and adults are phloem feeders.

EM 9313, Tasas de Aplicación de Estiércol para la Producción de Forraje en el Oeste de Oregón (Manure Application Rates for Forage Production)
Troy Downing, Dan M. Sullivan
New. En esta publicación se supone que el manejo de N se basa en un método conocido
como equilibrio de masa; el objetivo es mantener un equilibrio entre el N suministrado por el estiércol y la extracción de N mediante la cosecha de forraje.

EM 9316, How to Do Regular Maintenance on Air Blast Sprayers to Ensure Proper Care for Specialty Crops
Brent Warneke, Jay Pscheidt, Lloyd Nackley
New. Air blast sprayers are one of the most common sprayer types used in specialty crop production. These machines are designed for heavy use on farms, and like all machinery, require regular attention to function effectively. This publication highlights periodic maintenance tasks for air blast sprayers. This is a general maintenance guide meant to complement the manual that comes with many sprayers.

PNW 507, Growing Kiwifruit: A Guide to Kiwiberries and Fuzzy Kiwifruit for Pacific Northwest Producers
Bernadine Strik, Amanda Davis
Revised. Oregon is a leading producer of kiwiberries, also known as hardy kiwifruit. Learn what cultivars work best for commercial production, and study research-based techniques for site selection, planting, maintenance, harvest and storage.

PNW 736, Fruit Pie Fillings for Home Canning
Lizann Powers-Hammond
New. Imagine using home-canned fruits in pies, pastries, parfaits, cobblers, crisps, or even as a topping for pancakes. Recipes for home-canned fruits found here!

Extension News and Impact Stories

Producing news and impact stories is the No. 1 priority for the Extension Communications’ news team, as we help you share how Extension is actively serving communities. These stories were published in the last week:

We encourage active sharing of these stories across Extension’s social media accounts and inclusion in appropriate newsletters. We will include recently published stories in Extension ConnEXTion each week. Feel free to browse the Extension website news section and Our Impact site as well, for stories that are relevant to your communities.

Do you have a story that you want to share? Contact Chris Branam, Extension Communications’ news and public issues education leader, chris.branam@oregonstate.edu.

Navigator Digital Strategy Update

Trying to find something online? Top 4 tips for better search results

1. Use quotes around search terms for results that exactly match the terms.
(e.g. “Managing Moss in Lawns in Western Oregon”)

2. Add “site:” followed by a website URL in your search and it will only search that site.
(e.g. Pruning site:extension.oregonstate.edu)

3. Use a hyphen to exclude words from search results.
(e.g. Preserving jam -strawberry)

4. Use a wildcard placeholder by adding an asterisk if you don’t remember a word or need different endings.
(e.g. Better Bones and *; vaccin* could mean vaccine, vaccines, vaccination, vaccinated)

For more tips watch the past professional development webinar Internet Brower and Search Tips and Tricks. Also, Google’s Refine web search “cheat sheet” is also recommended.

Diversity Highlights

Please contact inclusive.outreach@oregonstate.edu with any questions, or suggestions for Diversity Highlights content.

Statewide Events & Resources

New CORA Learning programs, including “Dismantling Anti-Blackness on Your Campus: Core Competencies for Allies,” and “Course Design for Racial Equity.” Learn more and register here.

Webinar for Child Abuse Prevention Month: Join higher education and youth development professionals from throughout the U.S. for a free webinar on April 9 at 10 a.m. Expert panelists from Boys & Girls Clubs of America, YMCA USA, American Camp Association and The Salvation Army will address challenges they faced in 2020 related to child safety and youth protection, and lessons learned for 2021 programming and beyond. Register here

Nominations open: The President’s Commission on the Status of Women, Office of Institutional Diversity, Office of the Provost and OSU Athletics are accepting nominations for the Breaking Barriers awards. Categories include Breaking Barriers in Education, Breaking Barriers in Research, Breaking Barriers in Athletics, the PCOSW Community Builder and the Harriet “Hattie” Redmond awards. Learn more and submit nominations at beav.es/Jby. Nominations close Tuesday, April 6. For questions, contact pcosw@oregonstate.edu.

DEI News

‘Fifteen boxes, 15 families.’ Hermiston groups bring supplies to thousands of essential farmworkers (East Oregonian)
“It’s an effort to help a community that has been disproportionately impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic,” Garcia says. In 2020, residents reporting Hispanic ethnicity accounted for 41% of Umatilla County’s total COVID-19 cases.

AC&U Diversity Conference Kicks Off With Several Truth and Dares for Academia (Diverse Edu)
The theme of this year’s three-day, virtual conference was “Upholding These Truths: Equity, Diversity, and Democracy.” Keynote speaker, Dr. Lori Patton Davis, professor of higher education and student affairs and chair of the Department of Educational Studies at The Ohio State University, began by issuing uncomfortable truths about the current reality of diversity work in academia. She posed the question: When it comes to diversity work, who is actually doing the work?

Extension in the News

OSU Extension Service chickcam returns: 3 chicks hatched so far, 21 more to go
Oregon Fox 12
The popular “chickcam” has been set up at the OSU Extension Service in Clatsop County for the eighth year.

Above The Surface
Eugene Weekly
Amanda Gladics, a coastal fisheries extension agent for Oregon State University’s Oregon Sea Grant, says the market for dungeness crab in Oregon has become increasingly important due to its high value, especially as other stocks begin to account for a lower percentage of total catch.

Researchers study spent hemp biomass as animal feed
Capital Press
Jenifer Cruickshank, who works with OSU Extension Service as the regional dairy faculty for the Willamette Valley, said she is also contacting ranchers and consumers to gauge public acceptance of consuming products from animals fed with hemp.

Oregon’s post-wildfire reforestation efforts hampered by tree seedling shortage
OPB
Ryan Gordon is with the Oregon Department of Forestry. He says the agency is teaming up with the Oregon State University Extension Service and other organizations to help landowners meet their goals.

Eastern Oregon Livestock Show rides again
The Observer
The Eastern Oregon Livestock Show’s Main Street parade also is returning and starts at 2 p.m. June 11. Youth FFA and 4-H events will go on this year, but their schedules will be announced later.

Traditional county fair is in the works for 2021
Madras Pioneer
Plans are underway for the 4-H and FAA youth livestock show and sale as well as all of the traditional fair activities such as the rodeo, exhibit entries, food and commercial vendors, beer garden, concerts, and a carnival with all safety guidelines in place.

‘Trees to Know in Oregon and Washington’ turns 70 with new edition
KTVZ
Trees to Know in Oregon and Washington,” the most popular publication in the Oregon State University Extension Service catalog, celebrates 70 years with a new edition.

OSU Master Gardeners offer virtual Q&A on growing vegetables in C. Oregon
KTVZ
The class also includes the free 24-page book, “Growing Vegetables in Central Oregon”, https://catalog.extension.oregonstate.edu/em9128), published by the OSU Extension Service.

How to Prune Roses
Family Handyman
“Neglecting to prune your roses will lead to unproductive shrubs,” says Oregon State University professor and extension horticulturist Amy Jo Detweiler. Pruning roses promotes new growth and flowering, helps maintain plant health, and on some species encourages repeat blooming.

AG DAY: A day in the life of a ranching family
The Blue Mountain Eagle
McCracken’s wife, Didgette, the Open Campus coordinator at Oregon State University Extension office, is there to feed the cattle before her 9 a.m. conference call.

‘Kale master’ finds joy in helping fledgling gardeners
East Oregonian
Diana Romero, formerly OSU Extension’s master gardener program coordinator, called Hodge a “huge asset” to the program.

Clatskanie Grows
The Chief
A column by Chip Bubl.

New OSU Extension Fire Program to support wildfire preparedness, prescribed burning
The News-Review
A column by Chris Adlam.

In this week’s issue:

OSU Extension vaccination outreach and education updates

On March 19, the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) released additional details about the vaccine rollout in Oregon. According to OHA, about 58% of Oregonians age 65 and older have been vaccinated. The state is on a trajectory to vaccinate more than seven out of 10 older adults by March 29, which is the next date that new groups become eligible statewide.

According to OHA, some counties are ready to move on to the next eligibility groups. OHA doesn’t want appointment slots to go unfilled if areas have reached critical mass on currently eligible people. This week, counties will have the opportunity to confirm that they are ready to move on to Phase 1B, Group 6 to ensure available vaccine doses are reaching Oregonians. In addition, this week vaccinations will begin for migrant and seasonal farmworkers who are currently out in the fields working.

March 29 remains the statewide date for Phase 1B, Group 6, which includes:

  • Adults 45-64 with one or more underlying health conditions with increased risk
  • Migrant and seasonal farmworkers
  • Seafood and agricultural workers
  • Food processing workers
  • People living in low-income senior housing, senior congregate and independent living
  • Individuals experiencing houselessness (sheltered and unsheltered)
  • People currently displaced by wildfires
  • Wildland firefighters Pregnant people 16 and older

On April 19, Group 7 will become eligible:

  • Frontline workers as defined by the CDC
  • Multigenerational household members
  • Adults 16-44 with one or more underlying health conditions with increased risk

If the state receives the promised 250,000 or more prime doses per week, vaccinations will become available to everyone 16 and older in Oregon by May 1.

Reminders from previous weeks’ updates:

  • Subscribe to OHA COVID-19 Health Talking Points. This document is updated and distributed regularly on Tuesdays and Fridays with occasional updates on other days as needed.
  • From the CDC Vaccinate with Confidence Campaign, Six Ways to Help Build COVID-19 Vaccine Confidence:
    • Encourage leaders in your family, community, or organizations to be vaccine champions.
    • Have discussions about COVID-19 vaccines where people can openly discuss their views and ask questions.
    • S hare key messages through multiple channels that people trust and that promote action.
    • Help educate people about COVID-19 vaccines, how they are developed and monitored for safety, and how individuals can talk to others about the vaccines.
    • L earn more about finding credible vaccine information. When you come across COVID-19 information, cross-check with CDC.gov and learn how to respond to misinformation you encounter.
    • When vaccine is offered to you, make visible your decision to get vaccinated and celebrate it!

Recently we encouraged that you can extend our reach particularly to harder-to-reach populations.  You might use this letter written by Lauren Kraemer to her StrongWomen and StrongPeople groups as an example for how you might engage other groups.

  • Know your audience
  • Select and adapt as needed materials appropriate to the audience and their needs and concerns – language, literacy level, organizational vs individual, any specific-vaccine related concerns.
  • Messaging tips
  • Evidence suggests that it is best to focus on the positive reasons for getting vaccinated and to avoid restating misinformation or “myths.” For examples, refer to this resource. 

‘Trees to Know’ book launch party and book sales

For the first time, Extension Communications is launching a paid Facebook ad campaign to promote “Trees to Know in Oregon and Washington,” a book published by OSU Extension! This 70th anniversary edition of the book features updated maps, easy-to-follow identification keys for native trees (and 50+ ornamental trees) and a new chapter on how a changing climate may affect Northwest forests.

Information and registration about the upcoming book launch Zoom (and YouTube Live) party at 6 to 7 p.m. on March 30, can be found on the campaign landing page. The launch party will be recorded and available on the campaign landing page for future viewing. Books also can be purchased on the site. All profits from book sales help fund OSU Extension.

Facebook ads for the webinar were launched on March 17. Ads to promote book sales will begin appearing the week of March 22 and are anticipated to run for four weeks. Organic posts on the OSU Extension Facebook page also will promote books sales. You are encouraged to share the posts on county and program social media. If you have questions, please contact Ann Marie Murphy.

Child Abuse Prevention in Youth Programs Webinar

Join higher education and youth development professionals from throughout the United States for a free webinar on April 9. Expert panelists from Boys & Girls Clubs of America, YMCA USA, American Camp Association and The Salvation Army will address challenges they faced in 2020 related to child safety and youth protection, and lessons learned for 2021 programming and beyond.  Oregon State University is proud to be a member institution of Higher Education Protection Network (HEPNet), an international association that seeks to advance the interactions of higher education institutions with children and youth. For questions, contact Eric Cardella, OSU director of youth safety and compliance.

Symposium on emergency preparedness and response

Extension professionals are encouraged to take advantage of the May 7 virtual symposium on emergency preparedness and response. The fee to attend the daylong symposium sponsored by the League of Oregon Cities and the Oregon Mayors Association is $75 for Extension employees (the government employee rate). To elevate awareness of OSU Extension’s emergency preparedness training and resources, we will be a session sponsor of the event. Mayors, city councilors, city managers, city administrators, public safety leaders, emergency managers, and more will be in attendance.

Professional Development Resources

Please check out the upcoming statewide professional development sessions, plenty of interesting sessions, past, present and future here.

Digital Marketing Series – Logistics of Instagram and Facebook Stories

University Marketing is hosting a series on Digital Marketing that is free and open to anyone. The next one will be March 26 at 2 p.m. and will do a deep dive into the logistics of Instagram and Facebook Stories. Tanya Randhawa and Tiffany Cochran, from University Marketing and Ecampus Marketing, respectively, will discuss how Stories can be utilized on both platforms, talk about the elements of what makes a good Story and how to get engagement, as well as go over some of the fun features. You don’t need to register in advance and can find the link to the zoom session, at any time, on the series page.

New Additions to OSU Extension Catalog

EM 8203, 2021 Pest Management Guide for Tree Fruits: Hood River, The Dalles, White Salmon, Rogue Valley
Ashley Thompson, Rick Hilton, Achala KC, Marcelo Moretti, Jay W. Pscheidt, Nik Wiman, Chris Adams, Andony Melathopoulos
Revised. This guide provides tree fruit growers with the latest information on pesticides and herbicides for fruit trees. People who grow apples, pears and cherries can learn application rates and recommendations for each stage of tree growth.

Extension News and Impact Stories

Producing news and impact stories is the No. 1 priority for the Extension Communications’ news team, as we help you share how Extension is actively serving communities. These stories were published in the last week:

We encourage active sharing of these stories across Extension’s social media accounts and inclusion in appropriate newsletters. We will include recently published stories in Extension ConnEXTion each week. Feel free to browse the Extension website news section and Our Impact site as well, for stories that are relevant to your communities.

Do you have a story that you want to share? Contact Chris Branam, Extension Communications’ news and public issues education leader, chris.branam@oregonstate.edu.

Navigator Digital Strategy Update

How to get better search results for your web content

If we don’t fill out metadata on our web content – such as tagging and descriptions – search engines won’t know what our content is about and won’t provide good results.

What you need to do as content authors:

1) Describe what people will find by creating short, unique, and meaningful page titles.

  • For example, Trunk diseases for grapes in Oregon. Or, Apply now for 4-H Ambassador Scholarships.

2) Remember to add a teaser description in concise, plain language.

  • If you don’t write teasers, then a search engine looks at the web content and makes guesses at what it’s about.

3) Use headings in your content and add alterative descriptions for your images.

  • Accessibility and search engine optimization go together – the more accessible you make your content the better it is for search engines.

The Extension website also does work to help search engines find your content, such as creating human readable URLs, submitting sitemaps and adding additional metatags.

Learn more in the recent 30-minute professional development webinar.

Diversity Highlights

Please contact inclusive.outreach@oregonstate.edu with any questions, and if you have suggestions for Diversity Highlights content.

Statewide Events & Resources

Asian Pacific Network of Oregon (APANO) Resilience Series
The Asian Pacific American Network of Oregon is a statewide, grassroots organization, uniting Asians and Pacific Islanders to achieve social justice using collective strength to advance equity through empowering communities.

DisOrient 2021 Film Festival (March 19-28)
DisOrient is the premiere Asian American independent film festival of Oregon, celebrating films with authentic Asian Pacific American voices, histories and stories, and highlighting social justice themes that translate to universal human experiences and broaden the narrative of who is American.

Crucial Conversations: The Learning & Organizational Development team, in University Human Resources office, offers open enrollment for University employees interested in Crucial Conversations courses. Crucial Conversations is a 10-hour course that teaches skills for creating alignment and agreement — by fostering open dialogue around high-stakes, emotional or risky topics — at all levels of your organization. By learning how to speak and be heard (and encouraging others to do the same), you’ll surface the best ideas, make the highest-quality decisions and then act on your decisions with unity and commitment. This program consists of a series of five live, online sessions on Thursdays, 9-11 a.m. April 15 through May 13. There is a $100 fee to attend Crucial Conversations. Learn more and register here.

DEI In the News

Lynette de Silva looks at the Vanport disaster through a new lens (OSU CEOAS)
Those familiar with Oregon history are likely to cringe when they hear the word “Vanport.” The story of this Multnomah County housing development, once the second-largest “city” in the state, and the epic flood that washed it away in 1948, is central to understanding the Black experience in Oregon. Lynette de Silva, co-director of the CEOAS program in Water Conflict Management and Transformation, is taking a new look at this historic event through the lens of transformative conflict analysis.

Disproportionate: The impacts of COVID-19 on Oregon’s Latino community (Gazette Times)
“In Oregon, one group has continued to bear the brunt of COVID-19 regardless of gender, socioeconomic standing or employment status. Oregon’s Latino community makes up about 13% of the state’s population but, for the last year, has accounted for anywhere from 25% to 30% or more of the state’s virus cases.”

Social justice for toddlers: These new books and programs start the conversation early (Washington Post)
Children must use cues from their parents to interact with the world around them, says Shauna Tominey, an assistant professor at Oregon State University and the author of “Creating Compassionate Kids.”

Extension in the News

Growing a Green Thumb
Eugene Weekly
So I reached out to Oregon State University’s Erica Chernoh, an assistant professor of practice with the Department of Horticulture and Master Gardener coordinator in Lane County.

Oregon wildfires leave smaller landowners scrambling for seedlings as demand spikes
The Register-Guard
While large-scale logging companies can and are moving operations to focus on burned timber while it’s still usable, including replanting with seedlings already on hand, Oregon State University Extension Service Forester Glenn Ahrens said smaller landowners are having a harder time adapting to the needs of an unexpected, wildfire-caused harvest.

Proponents revise Oregon forest eminent domain bill
Capital Press
Roughly half the forested watersheds that community water systems rely on are owned by private landowners who are subject to the state’s forest practices regulations, said Jon Souder, an Oregon State University forestry extension agent, speaking on behalf of himself.

Free Web Series Emphasizes Wildfire Safety
KLCC
OSU Extension Fire Program Manager Carrie Berger said she’s offered these workshops before.

Researcher uses electricity to zap weeds
Capital Press
With support from a USDA grant, Marcelo Moretti, OSU assistant professor of horticulture and Extension specialist, is starting experiments this month as part of a three-year project to evaluate the effectiveness of electric weed control in Oregon.

OSU Extension develops publication to identify, report Asian giant hornet
Capital Press
Andony Melathopoulos, pollinator health specialist for Oregon State University Extension Service, said he fielded 30 inquiries about possible Asian giant hornet sightings — 10 times as many reports as he gets for other invasive species.

Water Under the Bridge
The Astorian
For the past few weeks, 4-H members prepared speeches and practiced delivering information on a particular subject.

It’s about health and wellness: Gardening is an activity with multiple benefits
Wallowa County Chieftain
A column by Ann Bloom.

StrongPeople Program resumes after hiatus
Lake County Examiner
Oregon State University Lake County Extension Office and Lake County Senior Center will soon be starting the next session of the Lakeview StrongPeople Program.

Are Coffee Grounds Good for Plants?
Treehugger
Compost specialists at the Oregon State University Extension Service concluded that coffee grounds help sustain ideal temperatures in a compost pile in order to accelerate decomposition.

In this week’s issue:

OSU Extension vaccination outreach and education updates

Informative COVID-19 safety and vaccination videos for Spanish and Mam speakers are available in Box and on the COVID-19 employee resources page under Resources to Use (Covid 19: communication toolkits and templates). The videos were created by Juntos en Colaboración in Lincoln County, a partnership between Lincoln County Health and Human Services, Olalla Center, OSU Extension and community members.

Thanks to Dusti Linnell, Beatriz Botello and their Juntos en Colaboración team and to Aracelly and Abelina for recording these messages.  If you are interested in editing the videos to include local resources, please contact Victor Villegas. If you serve Mam-speaking community members, the Colaboración is able assist with editing the Mam videos.

The videos are also available on YouTube.

Here is some more information and ideas for you:

  • Some of you have shared concerns raised in local faith communities related to COVID-19 vaccines. These resources may be useful as you work to support your faith-based community partners to enhance vaccine confidence.
    • A statement from Roman Catholic leadership.
    • FAQ from the HHS Center for Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships
    • PBS Newshour segment on faith leaders support for vaccines.
  • President Biden is requiring states to make every U.S. adult eligible for the coronavirus vaccine by May 1. Here is an informative piece from The Washington Post addressing whether or not this is legal, realistic, the rate of vaccinations, etc. However, note that at Gov. Brown’s press conference on March 12, she and her staff noted that eligibility does not translate into every Oregonian getting shots by May 1, since this is still dependent upon supply. There was also some hesitancy expressed about overruling the governor’s current carefully determined eligibility timelines. Without enough vaccines, it appears that the governor would still want to implement distribution priorities.

Reminders from previous weeks’ updates:

  • Subscribe to OHA COVID-19 Health Talking Points. OHA updates these frequently and it’s a great way to stay on top of this changing landscape.
  • From the CDC Vaccinate with Confidence Campaign, Six Ways to Help Build COVID-19 Vaccine Confidence:
  1. Encourage leaders in your family, community, or organizations to be vaccine champions.
  2. Have discussions about COVID-19 vaccines where people can openly discuss their views and ask questions.
  3. Share key messagesthrough multiple channels that people trust and that promote action.
  4. Help educate people about COVID-19 vaccines, how they are developed and monitored for safety, and how individuals can talk to others about the vaccines.
  5. Learn more about finding credible vaccine information. When you come across COVID-19 information, cross-check with CDC.gov and learn how to respond to misinformation you encounter.
  6. When vaccine is offered to you, make visibleyour decision to get vaccinated and celebrate it!

Recently we encouraged that you could extend our reach particularly to harder-to-reach populations. You might use this letter written by Lauren Kraemer to her StrongWomen and StrongPeople groups as an example for how you might engage other groups.

  • Know your audience
  • Select and adapt as needed materials appropriate to the audience and their needs and concerns – language, literacy level, organizational vs individual, any specific-vaccine related concerns.
  • Messaging tips

Evidence suggests that it is best to focus on the positive reasons for getting vaccinated and to avoid restating misinformation or “myths.”  For examples, refer to this resource.

You’re Invited: Extension Employee Listening Session in March!

Join this Zoom session to learn about current efforts, and provide input in three key areas to help shape Extension’s diversity, equity and inclusion goals. This focus area has been developed over the past year, based on your feedback and institutional priorities:

  • Session 3: Expanding access to Extension programs and services
    March 17, 2021, 3-4:30 p.m., register

Past and current participants of the Diversity Champion program are invited to sign up to volunteer as facilitators and/or note takers for breakout group activities during the session. Anyone who is unable to attend, or wishes to share feedback anonymously, may do so any time using this form.

OSU Annual Gerontology Conference

Registration is open for the OSU’s 44th Annual Gerontology Conference, which will occur March 31-April 1 as a virtual event. More than 30 virtual educational sessions for those working with older adults. Topics include dementia, Parkinson’s disease, international innovations in care for older adults and social isolation during Covid. SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE – Please contact Teresa Crowley.

Professional Development Resources

Please check out the upcoming statewide professional development sessions, plenty of interesting sessions, past, present and future here.
Sessions for this week are:

Thursday, March 18 2021 @ 10:00 am: How to get better search results for your web content

Friday, March 19 2021 @ 10:30 am: Ask Anita: A bi-monthly connection opportunity

Extension News Stories

Producing news and impact stories is the No. 1 priority for the Extension Communications’ news team, as we help you share how Extension is actively serving communities. These stories were published in the last week:

We encourage active sharing of these stories across Extension’s social media accounts and inclusion in appropriate newsletters. We will include recently published stories in Extension ConnEXTion each week. Feel free to browse the Extension website news section and Our Impact site as well, for stories that are relevant to your communities.

Do you have a story that you want to share? Contact Chris Branam, Extension Communications’ news and public issues education leader, chris.branam@oregonstate.edu.

Navigator Digital Strategy Update

Are you curious about how people access web content using assistive technology? What is it like to navigate a webpage only by listening?

Extension Communications has created a series of short (3-5 minute) videos demonstrating the use of both screen reader software and assistive style overrides.

After watching these demos, what did you learn? What questions do you still have?

The Extension Communications Web and Content Strategy team is happy to talk with you about digital accessibility. Please use our support ticket form if you have any questions or would like advice or assistance. You can also watch the 30-minute “How content authors can improve digital accessibility” webinar.

Diversity Highlights

Please contact inclusive.outreach@oregonstate.edu with any questions, or suggestions for Diversity Highlights content.

Statewide Events & Resources

Webinar recording: Building Power and Change for Native People with Savannah Romero
Presented by COCC’s Season of Nonviolence, and Bend’s High Desert Museum as part of a series of events honoring nonviolent advocacy for human rights. Reference the resources shared by the speaker: Indigenous Futures Survey Report IFS Covid-19 Report http://indigenousfutures.illuminatives.org/ , and the Reclaiming Native Truth Report https://illuminatives.org/reclaiming-native-truth/.

OSU Changemakers webinar recording: Laura Galindo: Advocating for Oregon’s farmworkers
Laura Galindo was raised in The Dalles, Oregon, but has farmworker roots that stem back to Jalisco, Mexico. She is the former director of communications and strategic partnerships at Pineros y Campesinos Unidos del Noroeste (PCUN), Oregon’s largest Latinx labor union with a mission to empower farmworkers and working Latinx families to take action against systemic exploitation. Galindo studied political science and women, gender and sexuality studies at Oregon State, fueling her passion for advocacy and leading to her previous roles in electoral organizing, immigration services and undocumented workers’ rights.

DEI In the News

OSU units issue “Dear Survivors” letter: In an open letter from faculty and staff at the OSU Survivor Advocacy and Resource Center, Student Health Services, Counseling and Psychological Services and the Hattie Redmond Women and Gender Center, OSU units reaffirm their support for all survivors of sexual and interpersonal violence. The full letter is available here.

COVID testing clinics connect mid-valley Latino community to resources (Democrat-Herald)
Greater Albany Public Schools was on site providing goodie bags for kids, as well as resources on how to get educational assistance. The Community Services Consortium was there pushing for more Latino families to utilize the RideLine service, which helps transport people to doctor’s appointments at no cost. The Oregon State University Extension Service was also on hand, providing dietary health resources and information about how to get state food assistance.

Extension in the News

OSU shares guide on Asian giant hornets to promote public awareness
The OSU Extension Service’s publication includes a guide on how to properly identify the species, as well as information on its life cycle and predatory habits.

What’s Blooming? Springtime Plants Are Popping Up in Portland
Portland Monthly
Distinguished by its trumpet shape and “happy” yellow hue, the daffodil is a spring classic, says OSU extension community horticulturist Weston Miller.

Elusive vectors for grapevine red blotch
Good Fruit Grower
“The sense that the sky is falling is no longer there,” said Alexander Levin, a viticulturist who joined the Southern Oregon Research and Extension Center in 2016, as many young vineyards were starting to see symptoms.

Ag Distance Toolkit Allows Young People To Learn About The Farm During Pandemic
Pacific Northwest Ag Network
According to OSU’s 4-H program the funds allowed them to implement an innovative Ag Distance Education Toolkit, which Maureen Hotsy said allowed them to continue with the importance farm to table message.

OSU’s Wildfire Wednesdays Offer Tips to Avoid Another 2020
Oregon State University’s Forestry and Natural Resources Extension Fire Program is taking steps to help Oregon communities be ready for the 2021 fire season.

4-H Sportsmanship for Youth, Parents and Spectators
The News-Review
A column by Laurie Michaels.

Extension Spotlight: Planting season is varied in Western Oregon
The News-Review
A column by Steve Renquist.

Column: Garden Plots
The Chronicle
A column by Chip Bubl.

In this week’s issue:

OSU Extension vaccination outreach and education updates

Thanks to those of you already sharing educational materials or your time at vaccination clinics, and those still considering ways that we in Extension can respond to local needs while supporting public health and other community partners to increase vaccine uptake and speed us all toward recovery from the pandemic. This connection between education and actual distribution of vaccines is critical.

We’d like to make you aware of the following updated resources available to you:

COVID-19 topic page

  • CDC has issued new safety protocol guidance for those who are fully vaccinated. It has been added to the COVID-19 top page under Health and Well-Being.

Here is some more information and ideas for you:

  • A new process for Portland metro area appointments for adults 65 and older.
  • Johnson & Johnson vaccine
    • The U.S. Federal Drug Administration approved the single-dose Johnson & Johnson vaccine on Feb. 27. About 34,000 doses were delivered to Oregon the week of March 1.
    • The Western States Scientific Safety Review Workgroup has concluded that “the Johnson & Johnson (Janssen Biotech) COVID-19 vaccine is safe and effective for use in the Western States.” The workgroup, composed of nationally acclaimed scientists with expertise in immunizations and public health, has been independently reviewing the safety and efficacy of all FDA approved COVID-19 vaccines, and previously approved the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines late last year.
    • The vaccine requires regular refrigeration, and a single dose makes wider distribution possible in shorter timeframe.
  • The CDC has a new resource, “Finding Credible Vaccine Information.”

Reminders from previous weeks’ updates:

  • Subscribe to OHA COVID-19 Health Talking Points. OHA updates these frequently and it’s a great way to stay on top of this changing landscape.
  • From the CDC Vaccinate with Confidence Campaign, Six Ways to Help Build COVID-19 Vaccine Confidence.
  1. Encourage leaders in your family, community, or organizations to be vaccine champions.
  2. Have discussions about COVID-19 vaccines where people can openly discuss their views and ask questions.
  3. Share key messagesthrough multiple channels that people trust and that promote action.
  4. Help educate people about COVID-19 vaccines, how they are developed and monitored for safety, and how individuals can talk to others about the vaccines.
  5. Learn more about finding credible vaccine information. When you come across COVID-19 information, cross-check with CDC.gov and learn how to respond to misinformation you encounter.
  6. When vaccine is offered to you, make visibleyour decision to get vaccinated and celebrate it!

Recently we encouraged that you could extend our reach particularly to harder-to-reach populations. You might use this letter written by Lauren Kraemer to her StrongWomen and StrongPeople groups as an example for how you might engage other groups.

  • Know your audience
  • Select and adapt as needed materials appropriate to the audience and their needs and concerns – language, literacy level, organizational vs individual, any specific-vaccine related concerns.
  • Messaging tips
  • Evidence suggests that it is best to focus on the positive reasons for getting vaccinated and to avoid restating misinformation or “myths.” For examples, refer to this resource.

You’re Invited: Extension Employee Listening Sessions in March!

Join one or more of these Zoom sessions to learn about current efforts, and provide input in three key areas to help shape Extension’s diversity, equity and inclusion goals. These focus areas have been developed over the past year, based on your feedback and institutional priorities:

  • Session 1: People: Building capacity and supporting professional development
    March 10, 2021, 3-4:30 p.m., register
  • Session 2: Work Environment: Creating and sustaining an inclusive organizational culture
    March 11, 2021, 3-4:30 p.m., register
  • Session 3: Expanding access to Extension programs and services
    March 17, 2021, 3-4:30 p.m., register

Past and current participants of the Diversity Champion program are invited to sign up to volunteer as facilitators and/or note takers for breakout group activities during the sessions. Anyone who is unable to attend, or wishes to share feedback anonymously, may do so any time using this form.

New Training Resources

New OSU Training Portal on MyOregonState.com

The home page of each employee’s MyOregonState dashboard now features an OSU training portal, where faculty and staff can discover information about internal training resources that showcase the excellent work of OSU colleagues and departments. These resources span a range of topics related to academics and teaching; diversity, equity and inclusion; social justice; supervision and management; web and computing skills; compliance matters, and many others.

New online learning library pilot

OSU is collaborating with LinkedIn Learning to provide external online learning resources to the entire OSU community, including faculty, staff, graduate assistants and students, as a pilot program during 2021. LinkedIn Learning provides on-demand access to thousands of video-based courses on a wide variety of professional and personal development topics, with content developed, vetted and produced to meet specific quality standards.

First Monday Update

In case you missed it: Forty percent of Oregon’s family forests are managed, or co-managed, by women. The Women Owning Woodlands Network (WOWNet) provides participatory, hands-on peer learning to build technical skills and knowledge for its members. See the complete blog here.

Professional Development Resources

Please check out the upcoming statewide professional development sessions, plenty of interesting sessions, past, present and future here.
Sessions for the next two weeks are:

Thursday, March 11 @ 12:00 pm: Extension Teaching Network

Thursday, March 18 @ 10:00 am: How to get better search results for your web content

Register for the Ecampus Faculty Forum

On May 4-5, the 14th annual Ecampus Faculty Forum is in a virtual format, please share this information with your appropriate department members and encourage them to register today.

The Faculty Forum is a great opportunity for faculty, staff and administrators to engage in discussions about Oregon State’s online teaching excellence, innovative teaching methods and faculty experiences in online course development.

On both May 4 and 5, a half-day series of events will begin via Zoom at 12 p.m. PT. Breakout panel presentations will cover the following topics:

  • Lab work in the online classroom
  • Fostering inclusivity through student success initiatives
  • Applied learning opportunities
  • How to generate enriching discussions online
  • Establishing your presence while teaching at a distance

You can view the complete agenda on the Ecampus website.

This year’s keynote speaker is Thomas J. Tobin, the program area director for distance teaching and learning on the Learning Design, Development and Innovation team at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Through six key takeaways, Tom will share how faculty can observe, assess and strengthen their own online teaching practices in the moment of teaching itself.

Please add this exciting professional development event to your calendar and encourage those in your department to attend online this spring.

New Additions to OSU Extension Catalog

EC 1613, A Pocket Guide to Common Natural Enemies of Nursery Crops and Garden Pests in the Pacific Northwest
Melissa Scherr, Robin Rosetta, Lloyd Nackley
Revised. Learn how to identify some common insects that prey on garden pests. See what they look like at various life stages, and learn how to encourage beneficial insects in your garden or nursery. Print this pocket guide on letter-size paper and cut pages as indicated to make a booklet.

Extension News Stories

Producing news and impact stories is the No. 1 priority for the Extension Communications’ news team, as we help you share how Extension is actively serving communities. These stories were published in the last week:

We encourage active sharing of these stories across Extension’s social media accounts and inclusion in appropriate newsletters. We will include recently published stories in Extension ConnEXTion each week. Feel free to browse the Extension website news section and Our Impact site as well, for stories that are relevant to your communities.

Do you have a story that you want to share? Contact Chris Branam, Extension Communications’ news and public issues education leader, chris.branam@oregonstate.edu.

Navigator Digital Strategy Update

Extension serves as the hub for Walk with Ease in Oregon. In addition to supporting in-person programming, they work with PACE to offer a self-guided virtual program.

“As soon as a person is registered, an email is triggered and the program begins completely on their schedule,” says Allison Harris, Walk with Ease Program Coordinator.

This triggered email after registration is thanks to a constituent relationship management (CRM) system that PACE currently uses. Extension will soon have similar automation for program emails through the Salesforce CRM.

“It really helps us be set up to serve more participants,” says Allison. “We actually saw in 2020 a 483% increase in our participation and because of this partnership and this automation we were equipped to handle that easily.”

Learn more what this efficient process looks like and its benefits in this 10-minute webinar recording.

Diversity Highlights

Please contact inclusive.outreach@oregonstate.edu with any questions, or to submit Diversity Highlights content.

Statewide Events & Resources

TONIGHT! Oregon’s Black History: A Virtual Event and Conversation with Walidah Imarisha: Walidah Imarisha is a writer, activist, educator, and spoken word artist who will be giving a talk about Oregon’s Black History. Following her program, Imarisha will answer questions from the audience. March 9, 7 p.m. Registration is required. Link: https://beav.es/oEx.

TONIGHT! “Queer Resilience in the Era of Climate Change” with Vanessa Raditz: Join a free, public lecture and question and answer session with Vanessa Raditz (they/them), queer educator, activist and filmmaker, on Tuesday, March 9, 6-7 p.m. via Zoom. Registrants to this free event will also receive a link to view the collaborative documentary, “Fire & Flood: Queer Resilience in the Era of Climate Change,” directed by Raditz. Raditz is a queer cultural geographer, educator, and culture-shifter dedicated to community healing, opening access to land and resources and fostering a thriving local economy based on human and ecological resilience. Register here: oregonstate.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_8BOE9dp_Sjuv0wHNM5LV6Q.

Womxn in Science Outside the Lab event: Kishana Taylor, postdoctoral researcher at Carnegie Mellon University, will speak as part of the Ecology, Evolution and Conservation Biology (EECB) seminar series on “Prioritizing Intersectionality in Interdisciplinary Infectious Disease Research: Intersectional identities (and scientists) must inform how we study disease” on March 10, 4-5 p.m., via Zoom (beav.es/eecb) or YouTube: (beav.es/oSs).

DEI In the News

UO’s new institute fighting the common roots of racial and environmental injustice (OPB)
“The summer of protests for racial justice led to more frank and public discussions about Oregon’s racist history, and September’s wildfires burned 1.6 million acres, illustrating the increasing urgency of climate change. But an increasing number of academics, environmentalists and activists are asserting that these aren’t two disconnected issues; that they’re intertwined, with common roots in the same societal forces.”

The Activists Working to Remake the Food System (NY Times)
“for a number of Americans, the phrase “essential workers,” with its heroic overtones, has revealed for the first time something of the long-ignored lives of the farmers, meat processors and grocery store employees without whom there would be no food on our tables.”

Extension in the News

Safety net offered for depressed, suicidal farmers
Western Farmer-Stockman
QPR (Question, Persuade, Refer) – a new program from Oregon State University Extension Service – teaches farmers, ranchers and their family and friends how to interrupt the process that leads to suicide, according to Cassie Bouska, assistant professor in the OSU College of Agricultural Sciences.

Malheur County’s new 4-H coordinator is a ‘lifelong learner’ who has traveled to 150 countries
Argus Observer
Marti Deyo is still moving into her new position and office at the Malheur Extension Office, but on Friday was busy preparing for a planning session with local 4-H leaders.

County tables decision on funding Cyber Mill project
Blue Mountain Eagle
The Cyber Mill, according to Didgette McCracken, the Open Campus coordinator at Oregon State University Extension Office, is working under the nonprofit Grant County Digital, and the concept was presented to the court last month.

China, Russia benefit U.S. wheat growers
Capital Press
Christina Hagerty, an assistant professor of cereal pathology at Oregon State University’s Columbia Basin Agricultural Research Center, or CBARC, has taken over as the project’s principal investigator. Both the ARS and CBARC share a facility north of Pendleton.

Hobby helps Sisters man find cherished items lost by owners
The Bulletin
Todd Williver, 54, who works as a 4-H Program Coordinator for Oregon State University, was just as excited as the bride-to-be.

Sense of Place lecture features OSU Extension
Columbia Gorge News
Join Mt. Adams Institute for a virtual Sense of Place event, “The Legacy & Promise of Land Grant Universities and Oregon State University Extension in the Gorge,” March 10 at 7 p.m. on Zoom featuring Ann Harris.

Extension gives away free seeds for garden challenge
Polk Cunty Itemizer-Observer
Almost 38,000 free seed packets will be distributed by Oregon State University Extension Service to Oregonians who show no signs of losing the enthusiasm for gardening generated by the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Definition of Free-Range Chickens
Successful Farming
Jim Hermes is a retired extension poultry specialist at Oregon State University. He says the USDA has a legal definition of free range.

Oregon gardeners, here’s your March guide to planting and planning
The Oregonian
The Oregon State University Extension Service offers monthly planners for gardeners. In March, it’s time to plan your vegetable garden and monitor soil temperatures, just to get started.

In this week’s issue:

OSU Extension vaccination outreach and education updates

Thanks to those of you already sharing educational materials or your time at vaccination clinics, and those still considering ways that we in Extension can respond to local needs while supporting public health and other community partners to increase vaccine uptake and speed us all toward recovery from the pandemic.  This connection between education and actual distribution of vaccines is critical.

We’d like to make you aware of the following updated resources available to you:

COVID-19 internal resources page

  • Added a link to new CDC site for all of their “Vaccinate with Confidence” materials, including the toolkits we’ve shared (on their new sidebar).
  • Added an informative, encouraging, and all around splendid video from physicians in southern Oregon that you are free to use or use as an example for your own local providers Thanks Caryn Wheeler for sharing!

COVID-19 topic page

  • Helping Kids Get Comfortable with Masks – Advice for parents on helping kids with mask wearing, including a link to Mask up Oregon Kids video.
  • Coming next week: Links to informative COVID-19 safety and vaccination informational videos for Spanish and Mam speakers. The videos were created by Juntos en Colaboración in Lincoln County, a partnership between Lincoln County Health and Human Services, Olalla Center, OSU Extension and community members.  Thanks to Dusti Linnell, Beatriz Botello and their Juntos en Colaboración team and to Aracelly and Abelina for recording these messages. PLEASE NOTE: If you want to edit videos to exclude the Lincoln County information and replace with resources for your county, please include a final slide in español crediting Juntos en Colaboracion partners for developing the videos.

Here is some more information and ideas for you: 

  • The vaccine rollout
    • All adults older than 65 are now eligible.
    • On Friday, the state announced new groups and their eligibility dates. The following groups will be eligible no later than March 29:
      • Adults 45-64 with one or more underlying health conditions with increased risk (as defined by the CDC)
      • Migrant and seasonal farm workers
      • Seafood and agricultural workers
      • Food processing workers
      • People living in low-income senior housing, senior congregate and independent living
      • Individuals experiencing houselessness (sheltered and unsheltered)
      • People currently displaced by wildfires
      • Wildland firefighters
    • As Vice Provost for Student Affairs Dan Larson outlined in his e-mail to OSU employees on Friday, higher education employees who meet the CDC criteria for frontline workers will be eligible to receive the vaccine no later than May 1.
    • Oregonians age 16 and over will be eligible to receive the vaccine no later than July 1, provided supplies from the federal government continue as planned.
    • All of these eligibility dates are dependent on supplies from the federal government will continue as planned.
    • Many people who are eligible have had trouble getting a scheduled appointment even as pharmacies – including grocery store pharmacies – become official distribution sites. The state continues to ask for patience, expecting the supply chain to speed up. The approval of the one-dose Johnson & Johnson vaccine will boost supply significantly.
  • Possible phone navigator assistance for getting signed up for scheduling vaccinations
    • Most counties have a system where you need to sign up and then are contacted by the county health department for scheduling. For many people, this first step is a big hurdle.
    • We’ve learned that the 211 phone system to navigate scheduling has improved, with shorter wait times and language translators available. Please share this resource with others, especially older adults and those without internet access.
    • Some staff have asked if they also might assist by offering to help community members via phone for this phase of the sign up. The scheduling needs to stay within the purview of those who know the supply availability. Check first with your regional director and county office staff about capacity. If there is such, reach out to your local health department and offer that you could host a phone line for “x hours per day, x days per week,” to support community members to get into the county’s scheduling system.
    • If the health department agrees this could be useful, you might advertise that you are offering this service in volunteer materials, on your social media sites, through radio, etc.
  • You can be an informed spokesperson in all situations where you are in contact with the public. Please consider these key messages:
    • The best protection from becoming infected continues to be a combination of getting a COVID-19 vaccine, wearing a face covering, staying at least six feet away from others and washing your hands often. We need all these tools to end the pandemic.
    • Rates of infections and hospitalizations have been declining since the vaccination effort began.
    • From the CDC’s “Six Ways to Help Build COVID-19 Vaccine Confidence:”
  1. Encourage leaders in your family, community or organizations to be vaccine champions.
  2. Have discussions about COVID-19 vaccines where people can openly discuss their views and ask questions.
  3. Share key messagesthrough multiple channels that people trust and that promote action.
  4. Help educate people about COVID-19 vaccines, how they are developed and monitored for safety, and how individuals can talk to others about the vaccines.
  5. Learn more about finding credible vaccine information. When you come across COVID-19 information, cross-check with CDC.gov and learn how to respond to misinformation you encounter.
  6. When vaccine is offered to you, make visibleyour decision to get vaccinated and celebrate it!
  • Reminders from previous updates:
    • We encouraged that you could extend our reach particularly to harder-to-reach populations. You might use this letter written by Lauren Kraemer to her StrongWomen and StrongPeople groups as an example for how you might engage other groups.
    • Subscribe to OHA COVID-19 Health Talking Points.
      • OHA updates these frequently and it’s a great way to stay on top of this changing landscape.
    • Know your audience
    • Select and adapt as needed materials appropriate to the audience and their needs and concerns – language, literacy level, organizational vs individual, any specific-vaccine related concerns.
    • Messaging tips
    • Evidence suggests that it is best to focus on the positive reasons for getting vaccinated and to avoid restating misinformation or “myths.” For examples, refer to this resource.

You’re Invited: Extension Employee Listening Sessions in March!

Join one or more of these Zoom sessions to learn about current efforts, and provide input in three key areas to help shape Extension’s diversity, equity and inclusion goals. These focus areas have been developed over the past year, based on your feedback and institutional priorities:

      • Session 1: People: Building capacity and supporting professional development
        March 10, 2021, 3-4:30 p.m., register
      • Session 2: Work Environment: Creating and sustaining an inclusive organizational culture
        March 11, 2021, 3-4:30 p.m., register
      • Session 3: Expanding access to Extension programs and services
        March 17, 2021, 3-4:30 p.m., register

Past and current participants of the Diversity Champion program are invited to sign up to volunteer as facilitators and/or note takers for breakout group activities during the sessions. Anyone who is unable to attend, or wishes to share feedback anonymously, may do so any time using this form.

Congratulations Shannon

Shannon Caplan, OSU Open Campus and Family & Community Health Program, Assistant Professor of Practice (New position)

Professional Development Resources

Please check out the upcoming statewide professional development sessions, plenty of interesting sessions, past, present and future here.
Sessions for the next two weeks are:

Friday, March 5 @ 10:30 am: Ask Anita: A bi-monthly connection opportunity (45 mins)

Thursday, March 11 @ 12:00 pm: Extension Teaching Network

New Additions to OSU Extension Catalog

EM 8413, 2021 Pest Management Guide for Wine Grapes in Oregon
Patricia A. Skinkis, Jay W. Pscheidt, Marcelo Moretti, Vaughn M. Walton, Achala KC, Clive Kaiser
Revised. Learn the most effective techniques for controlling insects, weeds and disease on wine grapes in Oregon.

Extension News Stories

Producing news and impact stories is the No. 1 priority for the Extension Communications’ news team, as we help you share how Extension is actively serving communities. These storoes were published in the last week:

We encourage active sharing of these stories across Extension’s social media accounts and inclusion in appropriate newsletters. We will include recently published stories in Extension ConnEXTion each week. Feel free to browse the Extension website news section and Our Impact site as well, for stories that are relevant to your communities.

Do you have a story that you want to share? Contact Chris Branam, Extension Communications’ news and public issues education leader, chris.branam@oregonstate.edu.

Navigator Digital Strategy Update

Level up your county and program websites

We recently held a webinar to share some tips to level up your website. Watch the recording of the webinar.

We’ve added chapters to the video to help you find the sections you are interested in watching. To view the chapters, click the video’s navigation menu (the three lines in the top-left corner).

Some next steps:

  • Review your intro text on your main landing page. See recommended intro text for counties.
  • Add your impact information. Add impact information to “text with background” or “impact stats bar” sections. Here are two great examples: Lane County and Jefferson County (to view, scroll down to the “Investing in a vibrant…”).
  • Review your photos. Are they high quality? Do they have copyright information? Copyright information is now required for all images added to the site (i.e., to save a new image or update an existing image).
  • Check your text: Is it well chunked into small sections with a heading and short, clear paragraphs? Is any of the text or documents out-of-date?
  • Add 2-3 testimonials to your program website. And look through the Design tips for programs blog post to get ideas for different ways you can add content to your page.

Kudos to the many counties who have updated their landing pages since the webinar!

If you’d like some help making updates, please send your questions or requests to the OSU Extension website support system.

Diversity Highlights

Please contact inclusive.outreach@oregonstate.edu with any questions, and to submit Diversity Highlights content.

Statewide Events & Resources

CORA Learning Webinar: Racelighting
Join Drs. Frank Harris III and J. Luke Wood as they discuss their recent article published in Diverse Issues in Higher Education on Racelighting. Racelighting refers to the process whereby People of Color question their own thoughts and actions due to systematically delivered racialized messages that make them second guess their own lived experiences with racism. This webinar will be an informal discussion between Drs. Harris III and Wood on how Racelighting manifests in schools, community colleges, and universities. Wednesday, March 3, 11:30 a.m.

TRIAD: The OSU TRIAD Club’s programs are online and free this term, with all welcome. The next program of the term will be Thursday, March 4 at noon: Joel Zapata, assistant professor, School of History, Philosophy, and Religion, “Latina/os of the Great Plains and America’s Future.” Zoom link: https://oregonstate.zoom.us/j/92941195877pwd=UW00eG51R3NDQUxhY2dkS20vL3ZnUT09 Password: 034032.

Brave Conversations 2021: Celebrating The Black Woman
In honor of Women’s History Month, Dr. William T. Lewis, Sr. is hosting a Brave Convesation focused on Celebrating The Black Woman. In this conversation, Dr. Lewis will discuss with his guests various aspects of their lived-experiences as Black women living in America, covering points such as, navigating racism in work and in business, dealing with the “mad Black woman stereotype, black hair, and allyship. Thursday, March 4 at 3 p.m.

DEI In the News

The Advocate talks to Luhui Whitebear about Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women (Corvallis Advocate)
Luhui Whitebear, Oregon State University’s Native American Longhouse Eena Haws assistant director, said that these numbers are likely an undercount. “The number is definitely higher than that,” Whitebear said. “The problem is that there is not a clear, definitive [way of] knowing of how bad it is in Oregon right now.”

Certificate offers teachers trauma-invested education (East Oregonian)
A new Trauma in Educational Communities Certificate opened for enrollment in fall 2020, and is only one of its kind recognized by the Oregon Teacher Standards and Practices Commission. Teachers who complete the certificate program can add a specialization to their teaching license. With 18 credits, spread over six courses, students can earn the certificate in just less than a year, fully online.

Extension in the News

Fire protection options under debate for Ecola Creek Forest Reserve
The Astorian
Still, it’s a fire that stands out, and one other coastal communities should consider as they think about wildfire risk and the steps they can take to mitigate that risk, said Aaron Groth, an Astoria-based regional fire specialist with Oregon State University’s forestry and natural resources extension fire program.

OSU Extension giving away free seeds for Grow This! Garden Challenge
KTVZ
Almost 38,000 free seed packets will be distributed by Oregon State University Extension Service to Oregonians who show no signs of losing the enthusiasm for gardening generated by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Innovative harvesting system could be a game-changer for blueberry industry
Fruit Growers News
New harvesting technology developed by Wei Qiang Yang, associate professor and berry Extension agent for Oregon State University Extension Service, could reduce the average cost of harvesting fresh blueberries from more than $12,000 to $3,000 an acre.

With good care, asparagus beds produce for decades
Western Farmer-Stockman
Oregon State University Extension Service horticulturists say preparing an asparagus bed properly will reward you for decades.

Garden Plots
A column by Chip Bubl.