Job Interviews

I have had a number of job interviews for various positions over the past few years. I would say that the most effective interview process that I participated in was the one for Operations Representative for the Department of Recreational Sports. This was the first job I got since coming to college and I found that the whole system to be very efficient. Although this was for a minimum wage on campus job, the hiring process was designed to be very professional and mimic that of a corporate setting. The whole system was very well run and I felt that they were effective in picking out candidates. One aspect of the hiring process that stood out to me was the informational session they had before the actual interviews. In this meeting, they went over the specifics of the job and expectations. I felt that this was a good way to have clear communication and weed out any potential candidates that had a different idea of what was expected. When looking through the learning materials for this week, it is clear that strong understanding between both the interviewer and interviewee is critical to the success of the process (Module 4, Lecture 3: Improving Interview Effectiveness). In regards to reliability, validity, and utility, I believe that the Department of Rec Sports did a great job in their interview process. They asked insightful questions and were very good with communication. I would say that if I had to give any advice to this hiring team for the future is to watch out for subconscious bias. According to an article from the Harvard Business Review, “Replicating ourselves in hiring contributes to the prevalent gender segregation of jobs, with, for example, male bankers hiring more male bankers and female teachers hiring more female teachers” (Bohnet, 2016). This is important to keep in mind when hiring people because we may try to fill the roles with people we identify with. I have worked with the Department of Rec sports for nearly three years now and I can say that almost all the upper admin staff is made up of white males.

Sources:

Module 4, Lecture 3, Improving Interview Effectiveness

Iris, Bohnet. (April 2016) “How To Take Bias Out of Interviews” The Harvard Business Review. https://hbr.org/2016/04/how-to-take-the-bias-out-of-interviews

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