Source: Piqsels
Are you keen to learn a new language to add an extra dimension to your resume? It doesn’t matter if you’re close to graduating or you’re just getting started, it’s never too late to embrace foreign language learning. It can add a new string to your bow, giving you the ability to work overseas in countries that speak your new language. While there are some people that will choose to learn a new language simply because of their personal interest in it, there are many others motivated to do so for career purposes. Even those who learn a second language as a hobby soon recognize they can put their knowledge to good use in the form of a new career or vocation. Foreign language tutors will often build bespoke student packages that give discounted language lessons to college students with active university email addresses. That’s because the biggest challenge for students is to fit their linguistic studies around their college programs. It takes time to build your fluency in a new language too. It’s by no means an overnight task, but discounted tutoring can make it a more cost-effective undertaking. If you’re wondering what path your career could take with a foreign language under your belt, read on as we detail four potential vocations that could suit your multilingual talents.

Become a Translator or Interpreter

You could use your new linguistic skills in a full-time or part-time capacity, with the ability to work freelance as a translator or interpreter in your new language. Working freelance gives you the flexibility to take on as much translation work as you wish. There are several core competencies to bear in mind when working as a translator. You’ll have to be highly proficient in the language and some organizations will require you to have an academic background in the language too. You’ll also need literary skills in your native language to be able to translate or interpret with accuracy.

Work in Emergency Services

Source: Piqsels
A career in the emergency services could be hugely rewarding as a multilingual person. A 2018 BMC study demonstrated the value of multilingual and multicultural emergency healthcare. With the world becoming an increasingly smaller place, all kinds of nationalities and cultures mix in our neighborhoods. It’s what enriches the very fabric of today’s society. As an emergency services worker, you may encounter troubled citizens that speak very little English. If you happen to be proficient in their native tongue, you could be the difference in saving someone’s life, just by being able to effectively communicate with them.

Embrace a Customer Services Role

On the surface, a customer service position may not be a dedicated foreign language job. However, today’s customer service roles increasingly require multilingual employees to support customers from all walks of life. Customer service assistant roles for airlines, bus, and train stations increasingly value bilingual or multilingual applicants. Sometimes just knowing a certain language can open doors in customer service.

Get Creative in Localized Marketing

If you have a way with words, you could look to embrace a role in marketing. Global brands increasingly need marketing departments that can localize their messaging and tailor it to their cross-border audiences. Global businesses would not resonate without the ability to speak the language of their target demographic and have a firm grasp on their respective cultural values. Whether it’s blogging, social media, corporate communications, or advertising, your multilingual talents can help businesses speak the language of those they’re marketing to. Native languages aren’t going away anytime soon. As a multilingual professional, your services will always be in demand, whatever the field may be.
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