Oregon State University
Skip navigation

Interactive Communications

OSU YouTube channel

August 25th, 2008
Our YouTube channel currently features a mix of content, from polished commercials and official videos, to lectures and student-genereated pieces.

Our YouTube channel currently features a mix of content, from polished commercials and official videos, to lectures and student-generated pieces.

I’d like to say that we’re breaking new ground by launching an official YouTube channel for Oregon State. But in truth there are plenty other universities already out there. Perhaps the most trafficked and referenced YouTube presence even belongs to a school in our conference.

But I don’t feel like we’re arriving too late to be productive. We haven’t missed the dance; we’re just fashionably late. There’s no evidence that grassroots video is going anywhere. Nearly half the institutions referenced in a recent higher ed study on social media have an official channel. It’s becoming a serious forum for online outreach. Consider this:

Any doubts about the audience for educational video material have been dispelled by the experience of two University of Minnesota math professors, Jonathan Rogness and Douglas Arnold, whose short video, Moebius Transformations Revealed, has been viewed almost 1,300,000 times since its posting on YouTube in June 2007.

or this:

The UC Berkeley channel opened with more than 300 hours of videotaped courses and events on topics ranging from bioengineering to peace and conflict studies. The first video in a lecture series on integrative biology with professor Marian Diamond has been viewed 89,000 times. The first in a course titled Physics for Future Presidents, with professor Richard Muller, has been viewed more than 128,000 times. (Gulf Times)

or this:

Professors are the latest YouTube stars. The popularity of their appearances on YouTube and other video-sharing sites may end up opening up the classroom and making teaching—which once took place behind closed doors—a more public art. (Chronicle)

So we’re making a delayed but serious effort to learn how we can use YouTube to benefit our students and the institution. If you want to be a part of it, just let me know.

Leave a Reply

*

  • Categories

  • Subscribe to our mailing list

    * indicates required
  • University Relations and Marketing Offices

  • join the IMC network

    Join other OSU web communicators on the IMC Ning network.