share and reflect giffyWhat frameworks do we use when considering technology integration to support learning? What does digital literacy mean in education? Our January Learning Educational Technologies (LET) meeting focused on discussion surrounding these types of questions. Here are some highlights and resources.

Did you know the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) has new standards for K-12 students? Check out the 2016 ISTE Standards for Students (scroll to bottom) and compare them to the 2007 ISTE Standards for Students. The ISTE Standards for Teachers are due for a refresh. Compare the draft to the current ISTE Standards for Teachers. What are your thoughts?

What frameworks aid in guiding considerations surrounding learning technologies? We tapped the surface in our discussion, leaving more to explore! In my presentation, Brainstorm: Why, How, When, Which Tools, slides 3-7 explore a few such as the SAMR model, TPACK, critical pedagogy, considerations with English Learners, and more. We also had a rich discussion piggybacking off The Office of Educational Technology’s Educational Technology in Teacher Preparation Challenge (2016).

What does the term “digital literacy” mean? We began discussions and collecting related resources, while keeping in mind our ongoing conversation surrounding equity and inclusiveness in online spaces. Here are few resources promising to ignite conversation: From Written To Digital: The New Literacy in Educause Review (March/April 2016); Kathy Schrock’s Resources for the Digital Age; and sources I aggregate on my When Tech Met Ed Digital Literacies page. I highly recommend Kevin Kelly’s book, The Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technology Forces that will Shape our Future (2016) as food for thought in the context of education.

Let’s continue these discussions! Add to the resources and conversations by joining one of our upcoming LET meetings. Share in the Tech’d Out Learning Facebook group.

Box

Did you know OSU has Box? In short, Box is unlimited, secure cloud data storage. It allows anywhere, anytime, any device accessibility. It makes sharing and collaboration easy. Learn more at Box for Oregon State University and use the Getting Started With Box information.

The Learning Educational Technology (LET) Community gained an overview of the new Box for Oregon State University in our November meeting. We will continue to explore it!

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My screenshot taken yesterday between the LBJ Boyhood Home and the visitor center. It’s everywhere!

Guest Post by Rhonda Wise – My name is Rhonda Wise and I am currently working as a Seasonal Interpretive Park Ranger at Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Park in Johnson City, TX. As an Interpretive Ranger, my job is not only to educate but to connect our visitors, on a personal level, to the cultural and natural resources associated to the Johnson Presidency. The National Park Service is embarking on its second century of service. I want to make sure that I am prepared to represent the agency while adapting to meet the needs of our future visitors in a way that is relevant to them.

Pok’ewhat?!? Social media is swamped with the reports and posts, both good and bad, about the new Pok’emon Go mobile app and game.  The mobile app takes gamers to historical sites and markers in a quest to ‘catch’ the Pok’emon creatures.  The National Park Service is embracing it, with our current director producing a video welcoming Trainers, as the gamers are called, to the parks.  With his endorsement, I added his video to our facebook page and welcomed trainers to Lyndon B. Johnson National Historik Park (but inside I am cringing). 

Is this how we get millennials into and experiencing the parks?  I read an article today that made a statement that took my attention. ”Pok’emon Go managed to accomplish something that museums, historic sites and others have struggled with for years:  Getting a generation of nerds into the world to discover it, and its stories, anew.”

The positive… Pok’mon Go Live article

And the negative… Holocaust Museum

I will be anxiously watching as this plays out. Will we find new connections with this Pok’emon generation or will parks be a nondescript backdrop for the game? Is this or can this be used as a digital educational tool?  Thoughts? 

(Stay tuned. Rhonda is working on a project for the Educational Technology course. When it’s complete, an update will be made here to direct traffic to more of her engaging posts like this.)

recommendsWant to explore some learning technology resources? In our last LET Community meeting, we shared some of our favorites. Here are a few that represent an array of topics.

  • Cub Kahn suggests Teaching in a Digital Age. It is a new open, online textbook by Tony Bates, a long-time leader in the online learning world. Here are some sample chapters titles: Ch. 7 – Pedagogical Differences between Media, Ch. 8 – Choosing and Using Media in Education, Ch. 9 – Modes of Delivery, Ch. 11 – Ensuring Quality Teaching in a Digital Age.

Asking me for my one recommendation is like asking me if I’ll take a chocolate or coffee. My response is “Yes please to both.” Here’s a variety that serve different purposes.

  • Free Technology for Teachers is a must if you are interested in online learning technology tools. Richard Byrne shares and reviews free resources that teachers can use in the classroom. His short posts often include suggestions of how to incorporate the technologies and how to guides.
  • EdSurge is a site I subscribe to and enjoy updates on everything from product reviews for education, to research, to ed tech start ups.
  • Audrey Watters writes in many places, including Hack Education. I enjoy her insight, wit and candor in reporting on ed tech.
  • Steve Hargadon is also at the top of my list. He is behind many projects such as The Learning Revolution and free online conferences like the Global Education Conference.

If this isn’t enough, check out more of my recommendations at When Tech Met Ed/Blogs, Podasts, Social Networking as PD.

Don’t get overwhelmed as you explore! Organize in a RSS reader, such as Feedly or Inoreader and return to your favorites at your leisure.  

What are a few of your favorites?  Join us in sharing at our next LET Community or on the Tech’d Out Learning Facebook Group!

https://prezi.com/uxvomw8eo92a/tech-with-language-learners/#
https://prezi.com/uxvomw8eo92a/tech-with-language-learners/#

Here’s access to my presentation Why? How?When? and Which Tools? Learning Technologies with Language Learners. It’s divided into two parts. Part 1: Frameworks to view technology integration. (The why, the when and a bit of the how.) Part 2: The tools with some examples.

Don’t miss the “challenge” at the end.  1. Explore one of the categories interesting to you under the toolbox on When Tech Met Ed Resources. 2. Create something that may be used in your instructional setting. 3. Share your creation and the tool’s usefulness in supporting learning on this Padlet! Enjoy!

What framework(s) do you use to guide your integration of technologies in supporting language learning and/or content learning?

*This presentation was given to a group of university English instructors and to pre-service teachers in the College of Education.

Guest post by S. Horton, a K-12 educator in Cheridy Aduviri’s Winter 2015 Ed Tech class.

Web literacy is important for students to learn, regardless of their age.  Alan November’s website has a ton of resources on web literacy. When tackling this topic in the classroom, my students were falling asleep at the thought of reading another article. They demanded pop, fun, interaction, and creativity. I needed a way to get the information across while engaging them.  What was I to do? Create it!  My students and I created this user friendly, super fun Thinglink using a joined effort of Easel.ly and Thinglink.  It’s interactive. Click on the icons and explore!

 

How to use the Thinglink The tags have the answers to 13 questions on web literacy.  Some of the tags have follow-up activities that the students perform while reading the Thinglink creation. They click on an interactive link and then interact. Thus, the once bored students are no longer bored, but happily participating in web literacy skill improvement.

 

How I created the Thinglink First, in Easel.ly, an infographics site, I made the base picture. Then, using the snipping tool on the computer, to take a “picture” of the Easel.ly poster, I saved it as a jpeg file. Next, I uploaded the picture into Thinglink, a great site for creating interactive images. Then, I used the information on the November’s learning website to create tags on the poster.

You too can bring topics such as web literacy alive.  Give it a try! Check out related posts on When Tech Met Ed: Exploring Social Justice with Thinglink and Ways to Use Thinglink in EducationA thank you to S. Horton and her students!