Prof. Janet Tate has been named a Fellow of the American Physical Society.

“For contributions to structural, transport, and optical properties of a wide variety of electronic and superconducting materials.”

The American Physical Society is the national representative for the 50,000 industrial and academic physicists in the US.  Only 0.5% of APS members are Fellows of the Society at any given time.

Prof. Janet Tate and graduate student Bethany Matthews.
Prof. Janet Tate and graduate student Bethany Matthews.

On Monday Prof. Janet Tate received the F.A. Gilfillan Memorial Award for Distinguished Scholarship in Science.

 

Janet Tate receiving the Gilfillan Award
Janet Tate receiving the Gilfillan Award

Her research interests are in thin-film semiconductors for energy-related applications. Her group deposits thin films by physical vapor deposition, mostly pulsed laser deposition, and studies their structural, optical and electrical and thermal transport properties.

Over the past few years her group has created new methods of doping conductors to achieve a wide range of conductivities, with applications from solar cells to transparent transistors and have demonstrated some of the highest conductivities in p-type transparent oxides and sulfide thin films. Such behavior is more difficult to achieve with positive (p-type) carriers, than with negative (n-type) carriers, and her work has been very important in developing the field of transparent electronics, a major technology based partially on basic research done by Prof. Tate and her collaborators at OSU.

For more details on the award, see the College of Science story about the awards ceremony:

http://impact.oregonstate.edu/2015/09/celebrating-staff-and-faculty-excellence/

For more details on Prof. Tate’s research see her lab site:

http://www.physics.oregonstate.edu/~tate/

 

ppms_ec-II

Physics faculty Ethan Minot and Janet Tate are part of a team of 6 investigators who have been awarded an NSF grant to acquire a $700,000 instrument for materials science research. The instrument, known as a physical properties measurement system (PPMS), will be located in the Kelly Engineering Building and will support materials research across campus, and across all of Oregon. The PPMS allows researchers to study material properties (electrical/optical/magnetic) at extreme temperatures and magnetic fields.

Jeremiah Hauth is the recipient of the 2015 Hetherington Scholarship in the Department of Physics.

 

The Hetherington Scholarship was established by Ann and Bill Hetherington.  Bill is an emeritus faculty member in physics who realized while teaching that some of his students were working many hours to support themselves while also studying and doing research.  This scholarship  is intended to reduce the need for highly talented students to work so that they can focus on scholarship.

Instructor KC Walsh has received two awards to support his innovative teaching.

If I flip my classroom, maybe I can do this with animations?
If I flip my classroom, maybe I can do this with animations?

He has been awarded an ESTEME@OSU Action Research
Fellowship and an L.L. Stewart Faculty Development Award to support his research on the effectiveness of flipped classroom materials.

For details on the program please go to http://stem.oregonstate.edu/ad-action-research-fellowship

Congratulations to Janet Tate!

Prof. Janet Tate
Prof. Janet Tate

Physics Prof. Janet Tate is the 2015 recipient of the OSU Alumni Association Distinguished Professor Award.

The OSU Alumni Association Distinguished Professor Award recognizes a faculty member each year for superior academic performance, professional renown, and service to the University and to the public. She will be recognized at several events at the beginning of Fall quarter.

more details on the Award program can be found HERE .

Brian Johnson (Ostroverkhova group) has received the 2015 Physics Graduate Research Award in recognition of his work on organic semiconductors.

Brian_in_lab
Brian Johnson with optical setup.

He describes his work as follows.

I have focused on studying the charge photogeneration, carrier transport, and carrier trapping mechanisms in small molecule organic semiconductor materials, specifically, functionalized derivatives of pentacene and anthradithiophene. I developed a computational model which simulates experimental data and fits those simulations to measured data to extract quantitative material parameters. My work helps to answer one of the most important open questions in organic semiconductor material physics: what, exactly, is the process by which charge photogeneration happens? Classic models have been shown to be incomplete, and my work fits into gaps in the current research towards this topic, as much more work has been done on polymers than in small molecules, and investigations of nanosecond time scale carrier dynamics are rare. This work is important to the development of new materials for organic LEDs, solar cells, and transistors.