The SEC Construction Committee received a tour of the Linus Pauling Science Center.  The tour was conducted by Andersen Construction the general contractor for the LPSC and will also be the general contractor for the SEC.  The Andersen’s principal plays for the SEC project were all there to answer question. 

1. One of the upright blue cylinders produces all the hot water for the MU West end.

2. This is what building grounding systems look like. The MU does not have this.3. This series of conduits contains the total electricity requirement for LPI.

4. Electrical distribution systems at LPI.

5. Some day the MU will upgrade to this technology.

6. Overhead electrical branching and distribution, including emergency circuits.

7. Bob checks out the cardboard covering the new doorjambs to protect them prior to handover of the building from Contractor to Owner.

8. Terrible photo of the largest steel beam I have ever seen.

9. Electrical distribution room. Transformers mounted overhead to save space.

10. Electrical distribution room. Transformers mounted overhead to save space.

11. Electrical distribution room. Transformers mounted overhead to save space.

12. Electrical distribution room. Transformers mounted overhead to save space.

This room as well as the lab on the right are almost complete. The tegular ceiling and furniture are all that’s missing. The hallway in the middle is 50% done. Anderson has mastered the complexity of installing building systems according to schedule.

14. I almost cried when I saw these neatly segregated energy piping systems. These will all be represented on a 3D Building Information Management (BIM) tool that gets handed over to the Owner upon job completion. The SEC gets its own BIM set. Can we find how a system gets its energy supply on the first try? We can with BIM!

14. I almost cried when I saw these neatly segregated energy piping systems. These will all be represented on a 3D Building Information Management (BIM) tool that gets handed over to the Owner upon job completion. The SEC gets its own BIM set. Can we find how a system gets its energy supply on the first try? We can with BIM!

16. I almost cried when I saw these neatly segregated energy piping systems. These will all be represented on a 3D Building Information Management (BIM) tool that gets handed over to the Owner upon job completion. The SEC gets its own BIM set. Can we find how a system gets its energy supply on the first try? We can with BIM!

17. Gary stands next to red colored conduits denoting the power path for the fire system.

18. Part of the seismic support system for LPI. This brace is filled with concrete and should it be needed during an earthquake, it is designed to move and allow the building to bend and move some while staying standing. It would need to be replaced after the event if the building was deemed safe and returned to full use.

19. Given the many labs in the building there is a significant amount of moving air needed. All this ducting is stainless steel, the longest lived and most impermeable ducting available right now.

20. Mike and the guys take in the sights of the atrium and the highly coveted (soon to be) offices to the right.

21. This beam will remain visible to the public for years to come and is a great way to commemorate and honor the work it takes to raise a building in the 21st Century.

22. This is a 2 hour fire rated wall. It has two thicknesses of 5/8” drywall. Each drywall sheet is 4’ x 12’ and weighs 120 lbs. In this 12 foot wall section there are 6 sheets totaling 720 lbs. Throw in the studs, fasteners, tape and texture and the wall weight approaches half a ton per 12 foot span.

 

23. One of the results of Historic review, this screen wall started its design life as metal and, after review, became a cast stone screen. It’s made with screen inside in such a way as to remain under tension, making it thinner, stronger and less likely to crack. It’s also able to take on thermal loads on a west facing wall with less maintenance over time. Beauty part: It completely conceals the HVAC systems behind it. Better design over time = changed expectations for Owner.

24. Jay and Bob are grinning after Wendell told them they could touch the shiny metal. Actually, they’re looking at the leading edge HVAC system. The overhead ducting was designed and built with BIM technology. It was created off site and trucked in pieces up to 35 ft long, instead of the usual 5 – 7 foot pieces that then had to be welded in the air and hung on the job site. This represents a significant savings in installation time to the Owner.

25. This is the construction “laydown” area where tools, equipment, materials and logistical activities such as deliveries are made to the jobsite. This example displaces a significant amount of space. Our building will not have the complexity of LPI nor will our laydown area need to be as large. This area also supports a second building.

26. This is the construction “laydown” area where tools, equipment, materials and logistical activities such as deliveries are made to the jobsite. This example displaces a significant amount of space. Our building will not have the complexity of LPI nor will our laydown area need to be as large. This area also supports a second building.

27. These metal bands across the studs are backers for hanging things like pictures, cabinets, etc., that the owner typically does during the 6 – 12 months of outfitting that comes after construction. We want these everywhere that something can conceivably be hung or mounted.