Gabriel Nowak is a Junior in the Physics program at Oregon State.  He’s been in the Schellman group for 6 months and is writing a data comparator for the MINERvA and MicroBooNE experiments at Fermilab.

 

Gabriel Nowak working on the data comparator in the Fermilab neutrino control room.
Gabriel Nowak working on the data comparator in the Fermilab neutrino control room.

 

This link compares two versions of the MINERvA simulation code.  It combines  the CDF data validation code with Gabriel’s histogram generator.

We just posted our new postdoctoral scholar position.  The location is most likely Fermilab but we’ll consider people interested in working in Corvallis.

 

MicroBooNE/MINERvA (AJO-5824)

Oregon State U. – Postdoc

Field of Interest: hep-ex, nucl-ex
Experiment: FNAL-E-0974, FNAL-E-0938
Deadline: 2015-10-01
Region: North America
Job description:
Oregon State University is seeking a postdoctoral scholar to participate in the MicroBooNE and MINERvA experiments at Fermilab. The Oregon State group’s expertise is in data handling, validation and algorithms and our physics interest is in precision measurements of neutrino cross section in the energy regimes relevant to future neutrino oscillation experiments. The position will most likely be at Fermilab in Illinois.

We are looking for someone with prior experimental experience in either high energy physics or nuclear physics, not restricted to neutrino physics. Significant expertise in modern scientific computing and data analysis is a plus.

For full consideration, please apply by 10/1/2015

Please apply via academicjobs online at https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/5824
Contact: Heidi Schellman
Email: schellma@fnal.gov
More Information: https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/5824

http://inspirehep.net/record/1386441

Brandon Walker graduated from Northwestern in 2010 with Bachelor’s degrees in Physics and Astronomy and in Mathematics.  He did his honors thesis in the Schellman group on `An Algorithm for Particle Tracking and Analysis of Muons in the Main Injector Experiment v-A (MINERvA).”

BWalker6

He is currently a doctoral student in Medical Physics at the University of Wisconsin at Madison.

Brandon Walker (center) helps assemble the MINERvA detector 300 feet below Fermilab
Brandon Walker (center) helps assemble the MINERvA detector 300 feet below Fermilab

For his PhD, he’s designing and building a modular multi-source electron beam scanner for high speed computed tomography and 3D printing applications. The system would enable ultra-fast CT scans for improved image quality in cardiac imaging and could be a game changer for 3D printing. The Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF) has filed two patents for the project, one in 2014 and another in 2015 (patents pending).

He has also co-founded 2 startup companies. Formula Database, GelCombs and has his own consulting company that does quality assurance for radiation and diagnostic imaging products.

 

 

Emily Maher, a Physics Professor at MCLA, who was doing the night shift, has kindly documented the official setup in the Fermilab control room. This is on the MINERvA shift wiki but that makes it hard to post pictures so I’m reposting here.

 

Layout of all 8 screens
Layout of all 8 screens
MINOS DCS status and MINOS Run Control
Top 1: MINOS DCS status and MINOS Run Control
Run Control and MINOS DAQ summary
Top 2: Run Control and MINOS DAQ summary
Event display
top-4:HV control and beam
ECL – logbook
Shift checklist – processed data
GMBrowser – live data
Minervacam

 

The MINERvA experiment at Fermilab is currently running 24×7 in the NuMI neutrino beam.

We have set up a Remote Operations Center (UROC) at Oregon State where we can run remote shifts monitoring data acquisition and controlling data taking. This frees up the experts at Fermilab for emergency repairs.

IMG_2398

The screen on the far left shows neutrino interactions as they are logged at Fermilab.

screenshot

This is a picture of an anti-neutrino interaction in the MINERvA detector. The invisible neutrino entered from the left, hit a nucleus and produced a muon particle which exits to the right. The color scale of the far right shows the amount of energy deposited in each pixel of the detector.  The detector is about 10 m long and 2 m across.

I found out at shift turnover that Chris M. at Rochester had diagnosed a problem using a screen I didn’t know about.  So we agreed to document our displays to see if we’re looking at all the displays we need to look at.

Here is my general layout:

 

 

Overview of the OSU Uroc configuration
Overview of the OSU Uroc configuration
On the far left is the event display
On the far left is the event display
Top-left is run control for MINERvA and MINOS
Top-left is run control for MINERvA and MINOS
On the top-right is the Veto wall HV and 2 beam monitors
On the top-right is the Veto wall HV and 2 beam monitors
The MINERvAcam and Bennie the Beaver
The MINERvAcam and Bennie the Beaver
Bottom-left is the ECL logbook and a web browser for checking other site logs
Bottom-left is the ECL logbook and a web browser for checking other site logs
bottom-right are the monitoring plots.
bottom-right are the monitoring plots.
video feed
Far-right – a live video feed to the Fermilab control room. with the nu_2 and nu_3 – nu_1 seems to have wandered off somewhere.