Author Archives: edmunsot

Pearl Spears Gray: OSU’s Director of Affirmative Action 1973-1987

Thanks to Mary Williams, SCARC student worker for this post on Dr. Pearl Spears Gray!

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Pearl Spears Gray, born August 19, 1945 in Selma, Alabama, worked with OSU as an instructor for the Education Department for the Portland Urban Teach Education Program and the Affirmative Action Director from the years 1973 to 1987.  Her time at the school allowed for great strides in the Affirmative Action program, and aided Oregon State in becoming a more diverse and inclusive campus.

Dr. Gray was born in Alabama but grew up and went to high school in Washington D.C. After graduating she attended Wilberforce University for her undergrad then Antioch Putney University, where she got her Master’s in Secondary Education with an emphasis on African American history. Dr. Gray then went on to teach government, history and sociology at different high schools in the Washington D.C. area from the years of 1968 to 1973. In 1969. She received a grant from Rockefeller Family fund to study at different African universities  such as University College Cape Coast, along with Ghana and University of Ibadan. During this time she met her then husband, Eddie Gray, and had two children, Don and David Gray.

She came to work for Oregon State University as an instructor for the Portland Urban Teaching program in 1973.  This program was a “cooperative effort between the OSU school of Education and the Portland public schools to train minority students in education for teach in urban schools”. After three years, Dr. Gray decided to move to Corvallis and take the position as Affirmative Action officer, where at the time there were 250 African American students. In an article from the Oregon Stater she states, “I view this office as a service to the university…we can broaden the awareness of the university population about what is discriminatory. We can be a source of information, a force of change, and in integral part of this university in terms of developing programs that speak to the needs of women and minorities.” Through her hard work and dedication she the Black Journal placed her on a list called “100 Most Influential Friends” in 1977. Around this same time, she began to create a report for Oregon State’s compliance with Title IX and found that there were some shortcomings in the athletic department, requiring that they change their department to be more inclusive.

During this time Dr. Gray was also working to complete her PhD. Between 1976-1979 she took multiple courses including Statistical Methods, Historiography, Anthropology of Africa, and Adv. Cultural Anthropology Reading & Conference. In 1985, she completed and presented her thesis African-American Folkloric Form and Function in Segregated One-Room Schools, earning her a PhD in Philosophy in Educational Foundations at Oregon State University.

In 1986, Dr. Gray was appointed as ACE Fellow, and was selected to spend most of her fellowship at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville. Oregon State granted her a two year leave in order to fulfill her fellowship, but she ultimately decides to take position offered to her as Associate Provost for Policy and Assistant to the President at the University of Virginia in 1987.

Dr. Pearl Spears Grey was and extremely active advocate for diversity in academia. During her career she was a part of Delta Sigma Theta and “instrumental in beginning a new chapter…at OSU”, a part of African Heritage Studies Association, National Council for Social Science, Associate for the Study of Negro Life & History, Daughter of Isis, Order of the Eastern Star, Urban League of R.I. (board member), and served on the Governor’s Commission on Black Affairs. She pushed Oregon State University to open the doors to those who were not originally given the opportunity and allowed them to feel accepted on a predominately white campus.

Jeanne Dost, Economics, and Women at OSU

Thanks to SCARC student Mary Williams for this post on Jeanne Dost, who among many other things was a Professor of Economics and Director of Women’s Center AND Director of Women Studies. 

Cover of "The Birth of the Women's Center," MSS MC 57.20: Dost, Jeanne, 1990.

Cover of “The Birth of the Women’s Center,” MSS MC 57.20: Dost, Jeanne, 1990.

Born in Walla Walla, Washington on August 12, 1929, Jeanne Dost is well known as the warrior at the front lines of women’s rights in the state of Oregon’s universities. She spent most of her career fighting for her rights on Oregon State’s campus opening up opportunities for all women entering the world of academia.  Dr. Dost came to OSU in 1967 as a part-time Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics and was given the title of Professor Emeritus when she retired in 1991 after helping to start the Women Studies program and Women’s center.

Jeanne and Frank Dost married in 1950 after meeting at Washington State University where she completed her undergraduate degree in Economics.  From there the two moved to Massachusetts for Dr. Dost to complete her A.M. in Economics at Harvard University between the years if 1951 and 1953.  Once obtaining her graduate degree, Dr. Dost continued to work for her PhD at the same university, which she completed six years after her A.M. Between the years of 1953 to 1959, she worked as a Research Assistant at Harvard, an Instructor in Economics at Kansas State, and gave birth to her two children Karen, 1955, and Frederick, 1959. Finally, the family found their way to the Pacific Northwest when Dr. Dost acquired as position as an instructor at Washington State University in Economics.     

The Dost’s ultimately came to Oregon State University when they were both offered positions in their field of academia, but Dr. Dost was only hired as a part-time instructor for Introductory Economics.  This differed highly from her other at WSU, where she recalls teaching graduate level courses. From the years 1967 to 1972 she attempted to be hired in a full-time position as an Associate Professor for Economics.  In 1969, the opportunity arose when a position opened up for a full-time Associate Professor in Regional and Urban Economics, which she focused on when study for her PhD at Harvard. With multiple years of experience, involvement in different committees, and a vast education background, it was easy to assume that she would get the job. To her dismay, Dr. Dost was passed up for a man who was completing his Master’s degree in economics, and only after he decided to pass on the offer she was offered the position at part-time.  After this she began to research the treatment of female faculty for University of Oregon, Oregon State, and Portland State, to see if this was a common flow in Oregon’s academia. She returned with dismal results which showed how widespread this epidemics was. For Jeanne Dost, this was blatant sex discrimination and she voiced her opinion, to which she was fired soon after.

She formerly filed a complaint about the ordeal with Oregon State’s Faculty Review and Appeals Committee, the Federal Department of Health, Education and Welfare, and Oregon’s Bureau of Labor Civil Rights Division.  Oregon State’s Faculty Review and Appeals Committee found to no discrimination based on sex but rather on personality, claiming that she was considered “pushy” from others in the department, meaning they felt nothing needed to be down. In late 1971 though, the Bureau of Labor Civil Rights deemed it as obvious sex discrimination and highly recommended they hire Dr. Dost as a full-time Associate Professor with tenure. Six months later she was hired in that role but without tenure.

After this experience Dr. Dost knew there needed to a change on campus, she and colleagues advocated for the Women’s Center which opened the academic year of 1972-1973. In August 1973 she and the OSU President, were about able to create a position for her as Director of Women’s Center and Director of Women Studies. From there she pushed for the much needed change by making the Women Studies program grow so much that by 1978, a student could gain a graduate degree in the program.

Dr. Dost continued to make change on Oregon State’s campus until her retirement as Emeritus Professor in 1991.  Although she continued to be involved, her experiences left Jeanne Dost with a bad taste in her mouth when it came to OSU.  She decided to remove herself from the university completely, offering all of her works to the Archives at the University of Oregon.  After her retirement, she and her husband Frank moved to the British Columbia for about four years but finally settled into a home in Freeland, Washington around 1995.  During her retirement she wrote the book Women: Two Decades of Discovery where she examined the wage gap and other economic disparities between the sexes. Dr. Jeanne Dost passed away in 2012 from Leukemia and Alzheimers and is survived but her loving family, Frank, Karen and Frederick.

Lois Sather McGill ~ the Food Science and Technology change maker!

Thanks to SCARC student worker Mary Williams for this blog post!

Sather in 1947, President's Office Photographs (P092:0522)

Sather in 1947, President’s Office Photographs (P092:0522)

Lois Sather McGill, born Lois Ann Young, was born in 1923 in Wilsonville, Oregon. During her long career at Oregon State University, Sather McGill started and ran the food testing program, wrote or co-wrote over 50 technical papers from her studies, paved a path for women in the Department of Food Sciences and Technology, and maintained a strong connection to the scientific community in her involvement with multiple committees.

At the time of her retirement she was given the title of Emeritus Professor and recognized as major contributor to the Department she dedicated nearly forty years to.

From the years 1941-1945 Sather McGill studied for a B.S. in Home Economics and was hired as an Instructor and Research Assistant for the Department of Food Sciences and Technology right after graduating, making her the first woman to be hired in the program. Her job was to “set up a sensory evaluation program” at Oregon State University, and by 1946 she had the program up and running. During her time in this position, Sather McGill helped to conduct flavor tests and research various case studies in taste. She chose to leave three years later in order to dedicate her time to “family matters.”

On September 1, 1946, Sather McGill married her first husband, Glenn V. Sather. The couple had three children between the years of 1948 and 1952 named Alan, Ronald, and Larry. At this point, Sather McGill chose to stay at home and “devoted [herself] mainly to family responsibilities.” After the birth of her third child, Larry, she resumed her position at Oregon State University as Instructor and Research Assistant as a replacement for Ruth M. Smith. After rejoining the faculty in 1953, Sather McGill remained at the university until her retirement.

Two years after rejoining the Department of Food Sciences and Technology, Sather McGill was given the position of Assistant Professor. Within her first year back in charge of the Flavorium, or food testing panel, it had grown to nearly 100-200 faculty or staff judges. The program was also given its own specific building along with expanded kitchen facilities and flavor booths. She began to focus much of her research on frozen packaging, with special attention to recipes for green beans and other produce.

Lois Sather at a food research meeting, 1958. Extension Bulletin Illustrations Photograph Collection (P 020)

Lois Sather at a food research meeting, 1958. Extension Bulletin Illustrations Photograph Collection (P020:1627)

In the April of 1966, Sather McGill’s husband, Glenn V. Sather, passed away, leaving her with three sons at the ages of about eighteen, sixteen, and fourteen. She married her second husband, Thomas E. McGill on August 10, 1969 who had three sons of his own, Patrick, Timothy and Dennis. Together they had a family of six children all varying in age.

From 1963 to 1972, she held the position of Associate Professor and earned the title of Professor of Food Science and Technology in 1973, which she maintained until her retirement. During her career, Sather McGill had been a part of flavor studies, took part in of 50 published technical papers, developed multiple dried fruit and vegetable recipes, and researched the factors that influence consumers preferences for beef.

While working at Oregon State she was extremely involved in multiple programs, both on campus and within the community, often earning her recognition for her work. In April of 1971, she was named as one of Corvallis’ Women of Achievement, and in May she was named “Employee of the Year” by the faculty chapter of the Oregon State Employees Association. She was a recognized member of National Institute of Food Technologies, and was in 1983 was elected as a Fellow after having held every office in the Oregon Section of the institute. Sather McGill was also a part of American Home Economics Association; American Dairy Science Association; American Society for Testing Materials; Sigma Xi, Science Honorary; Corvallis Chamber of Commerce; Altrusa; Century Club; Eastern Star; and the Kappa Delta Sorority.

In her 1983 retirement announcement, Sather McGill was described as having “an important role in the development of the curriculum, in developing [the] internship program and has been the leader for [the] undergraduate advising program.” In that same year she was offered the title of Emeritus Professor and was later honored with Earl Price Award of Excellence for Student Advising. After her retirement, she continued to be involved in the department and in 1989 was recognized as Early Contributor in Sensory Evaluation by Committee E-18 on Sensory Evaluation of Materials & Products, ASTM.

Mina McDaniel was hired to replace Sather McGill. Listen to or read McDaniel’s oral history online.

New University Advancement videos online!

Film projection demonstration, P082:78-1053

Film projection demonstration, P082:78-1053

Here’s our latest release of digitized videos, all mined from the University Advancement Videotapes (FV 210). Thanks to Brian Davis in the SCARC Digital Production Unit for the heavy lifting to get these online!

Alumni

Athletics

  • Fiesta Bowl pageantry, 2000-2001. (1:02:57) Raw footage of activities surrounding the 2001 Fiesta Bowl football game contested between OSU and the University of Notre Dame on January 1, 2001. Included are clips of the OSU pre-game pep rally held in Wells Fargo Arena on the campus of Arizona State University, the Fiesta Bowl Block Party, a pre-game parade, musical performances, and assorted Beaver fans reveling in the occasion.
  • OSU Pep Band and Felicia Ragland film, circa 2001. (0:07:11) Footage of the OSU Pep Band playing at Gill Coliseum followed by (at minute 0:02:05) a highlights and interview package on OSU women’s basketball player Felicia Ragland, the Pac-10 player of the year in 2001.

Campus Life

  • Dibble Garden dedication ceremony, October 30, 2000. (0:14:01) Footage includes presentations made by OSU President Paul Risser and First Lady Les Risser, OSU Foundation representative Kim Thompson, friend of the Dibble family Estora Moe, and representatives of the Associates Students of Oregon State University. The Dibble Garden is located near the southeast corner of the Valley Library.

Classroom Footage

Hatfield Marine Science Center

Multicultural Communities

Natural Resources

  • Careers in Forestry, circa 1990s. (0:11:37) Promotional film featuring interviews with US Forest Service District Ranger Nancy Graybeal, OSU Forestry professor Norm Johnson, Legal Defense Fund resource analyst Andy Stahl, Starker Forests manager Gary Blanchard, environmental interpreters Linda Paganelli and Mike Giannechini, quality control supervisor Mike Babb, and forest ecologist Peter Frenzen.
  • Conservation Farming Field Day, circa 1990s. (0:59:49) Field Day gathering focusing on conservation of internal resources

Promotional Films

 

SCARC Internship Program: Architectural drawings inventory and appraisal project

We’re looking for an intern to work with our collections archivist on an architectural drawings inventory and appraisal project!

architectural plans

 

Working with the SCARC Collections Archivist, this intern will appraise, inventory, and preserve architectural drawings for campus buildings and structures. Transferred from Facilities Services, this collection of 100-200 drawings created from 1920 to 1990.

As a part of this internship, you will learn how to assess informational and evidentiary value of a document, appraise archival materials, and gain processing and description skills. There will also be opportunities to share your work or discoveries through blog posts, social media, or events.

There are two main stages in this project. 
Appraise and inventory

  • Orientation to SCARC collections, with special focus on other processed collections with architectural drawings.
  • Learn basic principles in the evaluation and appraisal of archival material.
  • Review and make recommendations for the deaccessioning of drawings based on appraisal criteria.
  • Inventory drawings.

Preservation work and description

  • After initial appraisal, create project workflow to track the drawings in the process of being weeded, preserved, and stored.
  • Learn about best practices for preservation and proper storage for oversized materials.
  • Hands on practical experience with preservation.

Projects Available: Architectural drawings inventory and appraisal project

Internship Time Period: Winter and/or Spring Terms, 7-10 hours per week.

Deadline to Apply: November 16, 2018

It is unpaid, but can be done for course credit.

Qualifications:

  • Attention to detail is required.
  • Interest in building construction, university history, architectural evolution, paper materials preservation is preferred.

To apply, please complete the following:

  • 2018 SCARC Internship Application: http://bit.ly/SCARCinternshipapp
  • Resume, including at least 2 references
  • Writing sample, 2-3 pages (can be something you submitted for a class assignment).
  • Cover letter that addresses these items:
    • What interests you about this project?
    • What do you hope to gain in an internship with SCARC?
    • Describe the coursework, subject interest/expertise, and skills that make you a good match for the internship project.

Completed applications should be submitted to Tiah Edmunson-Morton, SCARC Student Internship Program Coordinator (edmunsot@oregonstate.edu).

The SCARC Internship Program is intended for students, both undergraduates and graduates (OSU and non-OSU), to have an immersive experience in understanding the full workings of an academic special collections and archives department. Intern(s) will work on one or possibly two main projects, while also experiencing the various functions of the department (i.e. job shadowing, meetings with staff members, attendance and participation in relevant meetings).

It’s Oregon Archives Month 2018!

OSU 150: Hops history open house: Oct 3rd 10:00-2:00 (SCARC foyer)

40082911160_14c5bb1059_oDid you know that Oregon State University has the first archive in the country dedicated to saving and sharing the history of hops and brewing? Visit the OHBA in the Valley Library to learn more about the history of research at OSU and hops throughout the state through a variety of photographs, memorabilia, oral histories, research reports, homebrew club newsletters, books, industry periodicals, and art from breweries throughout the state.

The Oregon Hops and Brewing Archives (OHBA), established in 2013, is the first in the U.S. dedicated to collecting, preserving, and sharing materials that tell the story of Northwest brewing. We document the regional hops and barley farming, craft and home brewing, cider, mead, and the OSU research that dates to the 1890s! Learn more about what you’ll find in the collections at https://guides.library.oregonstate.edu/brewingarchives.

4-H fashion revueLike, let’s do lunch! 1980s film showing: Oct 12 12:00-1:00 (Willamette East)

Like, let’s do lunch! Step back in time with News and Communications Service totally awesome film footage from the 1980s. Clips include DaVinci Days activities (1989), Art professor Harrison Branch talks with OSU Art students (1986), eavesdropping on curious campus conversations (1986), and aerial footage of campus (1983).

OSU Women exhibit reception Oct 17 4:00-6:00 (SCARC reading room)

Join us to celebrate, consider, and be curious about women’s work, words, communities, professional barriers, heartbreaks, contradictions, achievements, and perseverance. Learn more about the history of women at Oregon State University at the “Women’s Words : Women’s Work” exhibit opening and reception.

  • Treats, coffee, and exhibit tours 4:00-6:00.
  • Exhibit introduction and talk 5:00.

Glitter in the Archives! Using History to Imagine Queer and Trans Futures October 26 2:00-4:00 (SCARC reading room)

osqa glitterJoin the OSU Queer Archives (OSQA) for our annual crafting event using archival materials! Come learn about OSU and Corvallis area queer history and be inspired to imagine, create, and “craft” queer and trans futures.

The Great Beaver Bake Off Oct 31 12:00-1:00 Willamette Rooms.

Join us for the 12th annual archival recipe cooking event! Bring your favorite sweet treat to share. This year will be a baked good bake-off and tasting competition, so bring your best beaver spirit and dress up as your favorite baked good! Get inspired by historic recipes posted on our blog (bit.ly/2019OAMrecipes).

#dogaday: vintage dog photos all month long! Instagram @osuscarc

Missing your best canine friend? Celebrate archives this month with some of our very favorite historic dog photos.

Great Beaver Bake-off Recipes!

Mark your calendars for October 31st noon-1:00 for the 12th annual Taste of the ‘Chives! Meet us in the Willamette Rooms on the 3rd floor of the Valley Library and bring your best baked treats.

Men making donuts at the Sugar Crest Donuts Company in Portland

Here are some ideas:

folk club recipe book

 

  • folk club babka and beer rollsfolk club fried rice and rye breadfolk club pineapple custard and coconut cookiesfolk club sunsets portuguese sweet bread
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  • Citations
  • Men making donuts in Portland, Oregon. P217:34:65
  • Oregon State University Folk Club. Gateway to Our Kitchens : The Oregon State University Folk Club Cookbook. Corvallis, Or.: Printed by Franklin Press, 1981.
  • Oregon State Fair Cookbook Featuring Award-winning Recipes from past Years. Salem, Or.: Oregon State Fair & Exposition Center, 1983.

New guides for January and February!

The month isn’t quite done, but we’re excited to share the 8 new/updated finding aids completed in January and February 2018.

It’s an eclectic set! And you’ll see several links to Oregon Digital, where you’ll find all sorts of cool digital content.

DPDlogoDifference, Power, and Discrimination (DPD) Program Records, 1970-2011  (RG 250)

The DPD Program Records document the establishment and functioning of the DPD Program at Oregon State University as well as the topics of diversity, discrimination, racism, minority students and faculty, and women in higher education.  The DPD Program at Oregon State was established in the early 1990s as a means to deliver courses to address cultural and ethnic diversity as well as racism, discrimination, and their origins.

TL HeaderTeam Liberation Records, 2002-2004 (RG 287)

These records document the establishment and functioning of this organization during its first two years.  Team Liberation was established at Oregon State University in 2002 to provide interactive human relations workshops to the Oregon State community.  All the materials in the collection are born-digital records that are available to researchers in the Special Collections and Archives Research Center Reading Room. 

mss-centuryfarms-600wOregon Century Farm and Ranch Program Records, 2006-2016 (MSS ORCFRP)

The Oregon Century Farm and Ranch Program Records document farms and ranches in Oregon that have applied for and received recognition as Century or Sesquicentennial farms or ranches.  The records consist primarily of application materials and administrative files related to the awards ceremonies; a database listing all the farms and ranches accepted into the program is also included.  The Oregon Century Farm and Ranch Program was established in 1958.  All available application files and select administrative files are digitized and available in Oregon Digital. 

pride-center-600wPride Center Records, 1973-2013 (RG 236)

These records document the establishment of the Queer Resource Center (later known as the Pride Center) at Oregon State University and the programs and activities of this resource center for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) members of their OSU community and their allies.  The collection administrative records, publications, educational materials, posters, photographs, and digital copies of scrapbooks that are available in Oregon Digital.

Coed Code CoverAssociated Women Students Handbooks, 1924-1963 (PUB 010-23d)

These handbooks (commonly known as the Coed Code) consist of guides for women students at Oregon State University regarding regulations and expectations.  The first handbook was published in 1924 for the 1924-1925 academic year.  The Coed Code ceased publication in 1963 with the 1963-1964 issue.  The Associated Women Students was established at Oregon State in 1924 with the purpose of furthering the educational, social, and cultural aims of women.  Most of the items in this collection are available online in Oregon Digital.

oregon_countryman_191202-coverOregon Countryman, 1908-1922 (PUB 010-14a)

The Oregon Countryman was written, edited, and published by students in agriculture and home economics at Oregon Agricultural College from 1908 through 1929.  This archival collection consists of 11 unbound issues of the magazine published between June 1908 and February 1922.  These issues are available online.  An index for the magazine was prepared in the 1970s or 1980s and is also available online. 

 

 

hc1888-homen-600wHomer Maris Collection, 1918-1946 (MSS Maris)

This small collection contains correspondence and manuscripts relating to the Oregon State University alma mater, Carry Me Back, which was written and composed by Maris.  Also included in the collection are photographs and an Oregon Agricultural College student handbook.  In addition to incorporating an addition to the collection, this guide has been revised to reflect current descriptive standards and practice.

 

 

Persiani-002Paul J. Persiani Papers, 1938-2009 (MSS Persiani)

The Persiani Papers document the career of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) physicist Paul J. Persiani.  The collection includes research data related to neutron radiation, reactor development, and fuel analysis; administrative files, photographs, and memorabilia from Persiani’s time at ANL; records of his participation in the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START); publications, lectures, and teaching materials generated by Persiani; and reference materials including conference proceedings and scientific publications.  This guide has been updated to incorporate additions to the collection received in 2017.

Happy 2018 – look at the finding aids we did last month!

Thomas and Margaret Meehan, ca. 1980.Margaret Meehan Papers, 1961-1987 (MSS Meehan)

The Meehan Papers consist of materials created and assembled by Honors Program Director and History Department Instructor Margaret Meehan, a staff member at Oregon State University from 1970 to 1986.  The collection chiefly consists of materials relating to women in American history and culture and items documenting the assassinations of John F. Kennedy and Robert Kennedy.  

 

Helen H. Marburger Photograph Album, 1920-1926 (P 341)

This album documents the interests and activities of a woman tentatively identified as Helen Marburger – an Oregon Agricultural College student – between 1920 and 1926.  The album includes images of Marburger’s friends and family, campus buildings and views, recreational activities, and Oregon landscapes and landmarks,  The collection includes about 400 prints and 50 nitrate negatives.  This album was formerly part of Harriet’s Collection and was separated in order to allow for enhanced description.

Oregon Agriculture, 1944-1972 (PUB 006-43d)

These publications consist of two groups of reports issued in the late 1940s-early 1950s and in the early 1970s that summarize the status of agricultur3e and other natural resources in Oregon, identify trends, and recommend future directions.  The reports were published by the Oregon State University Extension Service.  All of the publications are available online in Oregon Digital. 

Nuclear Science Technical Reports Collection, 1946-1979 (MSS Reports)

This collection includes papers issued by a variety of both government and government-contracted organizations focused on the research, application, and development of nuclear energy and reactor design.  The finding aid describes items held in original paper form and those that are available online.  The original finding aid (created in 2009) was substantially revised in 2017.

Four Oral History Websites Released by SCARC!

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Four new oral history websites comprising more than 550 hours of content have been released by the Oral History Program at the Oregon State University Libraries Special Collections and Archives Research Center (SCARC). Three of these websites were built using open source resources that are available to other repositories seeking to provide online access to their own oral history collections.

OSU 150

The largest of these sites, The OSU Sesquicentennial Oral History Project, celebrates 150 years of OSU history by presenting 276 interviews conducted with OSU alumni, faculty, staff, current students and supporters. The project’s web portal is comprised of more than 400 hours of media and over 3.4 million words of transcription. About 1.8 TB of born-digital content were collected in building what is the largest oral history project ever conducted at Oregon State.

The vast majority of the interviews presented on the site were video recorded and all are contextualized with full-text transcripts, interview abstracts and biographical sketches. Users also have the option of sorting interviews by interviewee affiliation or interview theme, and are free to download .mp3 audio files of all interviews as well.

OHMS/Omeka Sites

In addition, three websites using a combination of the Oral History Metadata Synchronizer (OHMS) and the Omeka web publishing platform are also now available. These websites are:

All three of these websites utilize a combination of OHMS, the Omeka Seasons theme, the OHMSObject plug-in, and custom .css and .php modifications that have been released by the OSU Libraries on GitHub. Additional details on how the sites were created are provided in Technical Notes appended to each project.

For more information on any of these initiatives, please contact Chris Petersen, Senior Faculty Research Assistant in SCARC.