May and June 2019 Guide Additions to SCARC Collections

SCARC completed 2 new finding aids in May and June 2019.  The following is a list and a little information about what we accomplished.

These finalized finding aids are available through the Archives West finding aids database, our Archon finding aids interface, and the OSUL discovery system (a.k.a. “the catalog”).

Both of these guides are for collections that were only minimally described and are now fully processed and described.

All of these materials are now available to researchers!


Collections that were only minimally described and are now fully processed and described:

William F. Groves Photographs, 1888-1942 (P 135)
The William F. Groves Photographs are comprised of photographs assembled by William Franklin Groves throughout his life in Corvallis, and his time as a student at Oregon Agricultural College. Groves graduated from Oregon Agricultural College in 1897 with a degree in Mechanical Engineering. Images from this collection have been digitized and are available in Oregon Digital.

Gerald Hoard Photograph Collection, circa 1890-1915 (P 068) 
The Gerald Hoard Photograph Collection consists of glass plate negatives of Oregon Agricultural College scenes contemporary to the late-19th and early-20th century. Gerald Lester Hoard Jr. was born In Portland, Oregon on October 1, 1931 and attended Oregon State College between 1954 to 1955, where he studied engineering. The images clearly predate Hoard’s time as a student at Oregon State College, having been taken in the 1900s or earlier.  Images from this collection have been digitized and are available in Oregon Digital.

OSU Buildings Histories LibGuide Creation Internship

SCARC’s collections include documentation of nearly all of the hundreds of the OSU Corvallis campus buildings, both existing and nonextant. Over the years, OSU has named buildings after numerous individuals, renamed buildings, and has reused the same name to name different structures. This causes a number of challenges affecting various areas of departmental functions including arrangement and description, metadata for digitized materials, and public services. SCARC decided to create an internship project for an “OSU Building Names Research Project intern” to be responsible for creating a comprehensive LibGuide of buildings and building names on the Corvallis campus.

OSU Building Histories LibGuide

We hired history student and class of 2019 graduate Lydia Parker, and over the course winter and spring terms 2019, and 160 hours of work, she:

  • Read relevant portions of the books A School for the People by Larry Landis and The People’s School by Bill Robbins.
  • Used existing inventories to compile a comprehensive inventory of all current OSU named buildings on the Corvallis campus, along with an inventory of all nonextant OSU named buildings.
  • Used SCARC collections to determine all of the names that have been used for a given building.
  • Created a LibGuide of buildings and building names on the Corvallis campus – this LibGuide includes textual information about each building, SCARC materials citations, building photographs, and campus maps.
  • Created documentation of the process so that other interns and staff can continue with the project as needed.
  • Wrote a blog post about her experiences with the project to publish online via SCARC social media (see below!).

Parker’s work will positively impact various areas of SCARC departmental functions including arrangement and description, metadata for digitized materials, and public services. The compiled list of information will assist with finding aid updates and metadata clean up. And, the LibGuide will more effectively expose SCARC resources to researchers working on class papers and theses, scholars studying various topics related to buildings’ histories, faculty and staff seeking information about Oregon State’s administrative history, as well as the broader OSU community wanting to learn more about local history.

SCARC was absolutely delighted with Parker’s work and though we wish she could continue working for us, we wish her many congratulations on her graduation!

“As a Corvallis native, the Oregon State University campus has always felt like a second home to me. When I entered into my first year of college, I doubted my decision to come to Oregon State. I thought I should have gone somewhere else, somewhere further away from home- but after working in the Special Collections and Archives Research Center, I am so glad I stayed here. I learned more about “my home” than I ever thought possible, and gained experience that will last with me for a lifetime.

In my freshman and sophomore year, I didn’t know what I wanted to do with my life, career, schooling, etc. I changed my major three times before realizing that the only classes I consistently received ‘A’s in were History courses. My junior year, I made the switch to History. This opened a world of opportunities for me. I learned how to research, how to read thoroughly, and how to write. My history classes were fun and challenging, and often forced me to think about things from an empathetic point of view that I never really had before. Dr. Trina Hogg, my professor for History of Africa and my History Capstone, told me that “The act of doing history is looking empathetically at the past.”

I see that empathy in the way the people at SCARC work, and how carefully every collection is taken care of so that this knowledge might be preserved for generations to come. I am thankful for their hard work, and for allowing me to be a part of the Oregon State Buildings history.

Working in the Special Collections and Archives Research Center opened my eyes to things I never knew about a town and a campus that I have called home for 24 years. I often found myself lost in mesmerizing old photographs and memoirs about how things used to be. I am part of the 150th class to graduate from Oregon State. My time in the archives gave me a special view into the history of our campus, and how things have changed so much in the past 1.5 centuries. Working for SCARC gave me a unique outlook, and puts my accomplishment as a graduating senior into perspective. I will forever be grateful for the time I spent working over the last two terms.

Moving forward, I will be applying to graduate school in Indigenous Studies, and hopefully pursuing a career in teaching or journalism. I know that the experience I gained working in the Special Collections and Archives Research Center, learning to search the archives, and feeling comfortable looking through special collections, will be a huge benefit in my future endeavors.

Thank you, SCARC!”

~ Lydia Parker, class of 2019

Rare Books Shift

This post is contributed by Student Archivist Connor Lambert, a senior studying history and education. 


Connor and the “delightfully teal cart”

As a senior with two majors, one in education and one in history, I have managed to keep myself busy these last four years. My dream is to become a secondary school educator. This aspiration began with my mother, who teaches first grade. I always felt proud to tell others that my mom was a teacher, but I wanted to be a biologist. When I was a junior in high school, my thoughts officially turned to teaching because of my outstanding history teacher. His class felt like I was sitting though a movie because the stories that he was telling were so exciting. I had never been so interested in a class. He is the main reason that I want to be a teacher. Once I begin to teach, my goal is to teach history in a way that brings entertainment to students. I want to be able to create an engaging class that can ignite a love for the stories that created the world we live in. This upcoming September I will have the chance to put my plans into action when my student teaching year begins. In order to help fund my student teaching experience, I needed a job. I was lucky to finally find a position that allowed me to experience history firsthand.

Over the last few weeks I have been tasked with shifting all the collections over a few spaces in order to create more room for future expansion. My task involved a lot of loading books onto a delightfully teal cart, moving them a few aisles over, and putting them back onto a shelf. As tedious as this may sound, it was in reality one of the most interesting tasks that I have ever had. As someone who is interested in history and books, I find the sheer number of items within the archive amazing. More amazing than that is the age of many of them. I was moving and touching books that were published before the Civil War, and even many from before the Revolutionary War. The amount of history there is magical. Some items there make me question why things are ever even published. For example, books that are three feet tall and weigh fifty pounds. I cannot see any reasonable person deciding to go to the bookstore and picking themselves up a copy. On the other side of those odd few books, there was a plethora of old scientific journals that were full of hand drawn plants and animals.  Looking through these was by far my favorite part of the shift. It is one thing looking at these images on a computer screen, it is completely different to be feeling the age of the books in your hands while seeing what lays within.

The biggest takeaway from this project is that there is so much more within these archives than I ever thought. It feels as if the archive contains something that relates to any topic you can imagine.

Looking toward the future, I hope to be able to use the sources in SCARC, or any other archive to bring excitement into a classroom.  Much like with the old science journals, holding the item in your hands is a much more interesting experience than just talking about them and looking at pictures. If I am ever able to teach a class that has the opportunity to explore the many items within an archive I will undoubtedly take them there. I feel that it is a way to get interested in history. It allows for you to physically hold history, and that is why, although I was just moving books, it has been one of the coolest experiences I have had.

“Mountain Rescue” Video Now Available

This post is contributed by Student Archivist Genevieve Connolly, an undergraduate Physics major with a particular interest in particle physics and astrophysics. She loves studying languages on the side, and hopes that her future career takes her all over the world. 


The natural beauty of Oregon in the 1920s is a unique sight. Portland-born photographer Ralph I. Gifford (1894-1947) made it his mission to capture Oregon’s trademark scenery. As a photographer for the Travel and Information Department in the Oregon State Highway Commission, his photographs were used to promote tourism. However in addition to his contributions to Oregon’s tourist business, he also took motion pictures. This “Mountain Rescue” video is one such example. Shot on Mount Hood, the production was probably intended to be a search and rescue training video. It portrays a staged rescue during which a man hiking on the mountain falls, injuring his leg. He is then found by a group of rescuers who use a portable radio to call for assistance and then carry the injured man down the mountain and evacuate him. At 3:40, a Crag Rats Hood River patch can be seen on the left shoulder of one of the rescuers. Founded in 1926, the Crag Rats is the oldest mountain search and rescue organization in the United States.

SCARC obtained this footage from a donor in 2009. It came to SCARC out of order and interspersed with other miscellaneous footage of Oregon. In total, the collection consisted of 7 reels of 35mm nitrate film negatives (about 3200 feet). After being digitized it was arranged into the order displayed in the final video by two SCARC student employees: myself and my sister. My sister, Maddie, first watched the entire video containing the mountain rescue footage (about 35 minutes) from start to finish to sort out the timestamps of the mountain rescue. Then she discerned the story line of the rescue and listed the timestamps in the correct order. Using this list, I put together the final video in Adobe Premiere by cutting the footage at the timestamps indicated by my sister and rearranging them into the order she determined. I am happy to have been able to contribute to giving the public a glimpse into this aspect of Oregon’s history.

April 2019 Guide Additions to SCARC Collections

SCARC completed 11 new or updated finding aids in April 2019.  Following is a list and a little information about what we accomplished.

These finalized finding aids are available through the Archives West finding aids database, and the OSUL discovery system (a.k.a. “the catalog”).

  • Three of the guides are for collections that were only minimally described and are now fully processed and described.
  • Four  of the guides are for new collection received in 2014-2018 that were previously unavailable to researchers.
  • Four of the guides are updates to incorporate additions.

All of these materials are now available to researchers.


Collections that were only minimally described and are now fully processed and described:

College of Business Videotapes, 1983-2005 (FV 194)

The College of Business Videotapes principally document the activities of, and coursework related to, the Austin Family Business Program, which was founded at Oregon State University in 1985. The collection consists of recordings of events and trainings sponsored by the program as well as promotional materials used for program outreach and third party productions relevant to the subject of family businesses. The collection likewise includes recordings of Family Business Management course lectures offered to distance students by OSU Business professor Pat Frishkoff from 1997-2000.

Alexander K. Chapman Photograph Collection, 1908-1910 (P 235)

The Alexander K. Chapman Photograph Collection is comprised of photographs assembled by Alexander Kesterson Chapman between 1905 and 1909, when he was a student at Oregon Agricultural College. The collection includes photographs of student groups on campus, but is primarily comprised of individual portraits, both identified and not identified. Chapman graduated in 1909 with a Bachelor of Science degree in electrical engineering. Select images from this collection have been digitized and are available in Oregon Digital.

Ralph VanCleave Photographic Collection, circa 1860-1949 (P 156)

The Ralph VanCleave Photographic Collection contains images of the Horning Carding Mill and F.A. Horning residence, and includes written histories of both subjects. Also held within the collection are images, taken in the 1940s, of public schools from all around the Willamette Valley.

Images from this collection have been digitized and are available in Oregon Digital.

New Collections:

Educational Activities Committee Records, 1972-2015 (RG 293)

The Educational Activities Committee Records document the process for requests and allocations of student fees at Oregon State University.  In addition to information about the administration of the funding process, the records document the programs and activities of many fee-funded units and organizations such as the Associated Students of OSU, Student Media, Music Department, University Theater, and a multitude of students clubs and organizations.

Oregon Higher Education Oral Histories Collection, 2019 (OH 046)

The Oregon Higher Education Oral Histories Collection contains the interviews of 17 individuals sharing the histories and their experiences of 6 community colleges in Oregon including Blue Mountain Community College, Central Oregon Community College, Chemeketa Community College, Lane Community College, Linn-Benton Community College, and Portland Community College. All of the interviews are available online.

Joanne Tynon Papers, 1999-2016 (MSS Tynon)

The Joanne Tynon Papers document Tynon’s research in the area of outdoor recreation and tourism and her career as a faculty member at Oregon State University.  Tynon joined the faculty of the College of Forestry in 1997 and retired in 2017.

 

 

Wilson Room Prints Collection, 1738-1885 (MSS WilsonRoom)

The Wilson Room Prints Collection consists of nearly 200 prints from the late 18th century and early 19th century that were compiled by Norman and Glenville Starr Wilson and represent various printing processes of this period.

 

Finding aids that have been updated to incorporate additions:

Obo Addy Legacy Project Collection, 1970-2018 (MSS Addy)

The Obo Addy Legacy Project Collection consists of records, promotional materials, and various forms of media related to the Homowo African Arts and Cultures organization, later known as the Obo Addy Legacy Project. Obo Addy’s personal materials include correspondence, promotional materials, and photographs. Obo Addy, a master drummer at the age of six, established the Homowo African Arts and Cultures organization with his wife and manager Susan Addy as a way to celebrate and preserve the traditional music of Ghana and Africa. The organization was established in 1986 and closed in 2018.

Hop Growers of America Records, 1956-2011 (MSS HGA)

The Hop Growers of America Records (HGA) document the functioning of the organization. The HGA was founded in 1956 in Washington State. Its mission is to create a healthier and more efficient United States hops industry for corporations and farmers through education, advocacy, promotion, and support for technical and scientific research.

 

Thomas Kraemer Papers, 1908-2018 (MSS Kraemer)

This update reflects a major addition to this collection that was received in 2018.  Oregon State University alumnus Thomas Kraemer helped to found the Gay Peoples Alliance, the first officially recognized gay student group at OSU, in 1976. The Kraemer Papers reflect Kraemer’s decades-long research on LGBTQ+ issues. The collection includes Kraemer’s blog, blog reference materials, and research files; his collection of comics, magazines, and films; and some biographical materials.

Oregon Hop Growers Association Records, 1895-2004 (MSS OHGA)

The Oregon Hop Growers Association Records document the administration of the OHGA and its various activities, including outreach events and the collection of statistical information about hop production in the United States and abroad.  The general membership meeting minutes have been digitized: Oregon Hop Growers Association Meeting Minutes, 1955-1970Oregon Hop Growers Association Meeting Minutes 1971-1983Oregon Hop Growers Association Meeting Minutes 1984-1993.  All of the photographs and slides have been digitized and are available in Oregon Digital.

The videos have been digitized and are available online: Oregon Hop Commission Historical FootageJohn O’ Connell, Hop Growers of America conference presentationHops farming operations.

New! KBVR Video Now Available Online

The Special Collections and Archives Research Center (SCARC) obtained a large collection of audio-visual materials from KBVR-TV in 2015, when OSU’s student television studios moved into the new Student Experience Center. This collection, which was fully processed in 2017, consists of a number of video cassette tapes and DVDs from the KBVR television studio. Included along with the video files are a handful of audio files as well; primarily KBVR-FM radio bumpers and audio CDs. But most prominent are the KBVR-TV shows, all created by Oregon State University students through the years. Comedy shows, newscasts, talk shows, short films, game shows…just about anything the creative Beaver could fathom, KBVR aired.

SCARC is pleased to announce today that 241 items, mostly videos, are now freely available online. While this is only a fraction of the whole collection received from KBVR, it does represent a significant release of content that had previously been available by request only. Here now is your guide to this new cache of fascinating and fun video!

SCARC has released forty-one episodes of The Beaver Sports Show, a half-hour long program that featured student hosts across campus reporting on the latest sports news and interviewing notable Beaver athletes, while providing their take on Oregon State’s sports teams. The Beaver Sports Show episodes obtained by SCARC range from the years 2008-2011.  One episode of interest, from 2009, highlights a “day-in-the-life” of two Oregon State football wide receivers, Taylor Kavanaugh and James Rodgers, who went on to play for the Atlanta Falcons. The show was anchored by several students, including John Hendricks, Kalena Bell, Rick Stella, and Boon Kruger.

Similar to The Beaver Sports Show, KBVR-TV produced KBVR News. This was a thirty-minute nightly news program that detailed happenings around campus including student events, Corvallis and world news, and sports highlights. All of the segments were anchored and produced by students, notably Spencer Smallwood, Kelsey Gill, Mike Card and Marcus Collins. The clips date from 2004 through fall 2011.

Continuing the theme of news programs, Blonde Bombshells on the Hour is also presented in SCARC’s KBVR release. Blonde Bombshells on the Hour was a KBVR TV show that announced the latest music news from hosts, Camille Field and Elle McCracken, as well as Maya Holmes and Brittany Wooten. All of the anchors in this 2011 show shared the same hair color: blonde! Back to the Theatre was a 2010 show preceding Blonde Bombshells, with a somewhat similar theme: movies. Movie news and movie reviews were discussed on this talk show, six episodes of which are available online. The show was hosted by students Mike Card, Kelsey Gill, and Jay Lee, and in one episode of prominence, hosted special guest, OSU Distinguished Professor of Film Studies Jon Lewis.

Letting your voice be heard was a popular trend among students creating programming for KBVR-TV, and a few shows highlight this: Campus View (2008), No Big Whoop (2004-2008), and Questions on the Quad (2011.) These shows, usually airing in the late night, all hosted by two or more students who share their opinions on campus issues and encourage viewers to call in and either ask their own questions or share their own views. They typically focus on a guest who can speak to a topic the hosts are discussing in the episode. Questions on the Quad focused on student hosts roaming around the Memorial Union Quad, interviewing students on various topics. The show Open World (2008) shined a spotlight on international students discussing different aspects of their culture: geography, family dynamics, and the differences they’ve experienced since becoming an international student. SCARC has released three episodes of this show, hosting students from Africa, Japan, and Vietnam. Similar in style to Open World is Dr. Haydrogen German Vids (2013) which presents fascinating interviews with German instructors on their backgrounds in the German culture and language.

Another popular trend among students was producing their own sitcom, reality show, or game show. The two sitcoms in the collection, Anchors (2012) and The Jota Show (ca. 2000s) stars a large cast of students portraying characters in silly scenarios. Anchors is about a group of college-aged news anchors who constantly find themselves in trouble. The Jota Show is about a group of friends navigating young adult life. The reality shows presented in the collection are Greek Pads (2009), Limited Reality (1999), and Trading Rooms (2007-2008.)  Greek Pads is an MTV-style show where the viewer gets a personal tour of just about any Oregon State sorority or fraternity they want to see. Trading Rooms is based off of popular TLC show Trading Spaces, using a similar synopsis with a university influence: two sets of roommates, two designers, twelve hours, and a 250-dollar budget to revamp each other’s dorm rooms. Limited Reality has a similar plot to The Jota Show, but is a reality show about how average people act when they know they are being filmed. SCARC also has several game shows produced for KBVR, all inspired by popular television game shows and starring student contestants: Who Wants to be a Beaver? (2001), Blind Date Oregon State (2002), and the OSU Dating Game (2008-2009). Also in the online collection is one episode of a popular KBVR aerobics show Bodywise (1994) and a Japanese cooking show called Naomi’s Itadakimasu (ca. 1998). Itadakimasu is Japanese for “let’s eat!”

Another common theme KBVR-TV programming through the years has been music-centric shows–if Blonde Bombshells on the Hour and their Music Fusion Fridays weren’t telling enough, Beavers love music. The music-specific collection of videos in the online release are mostly concert footage: “The Meow Meow Show,” Oregon State’s Battle of the Bands, and the Flat Tail Music Festival. “The Meow Meow Show” was a 2004 concert headlined by five punk-rock bands. The University’s Battle of the Bands and Flat Tail Music Festival are annual events where student bands are encouraged to perform. Locals Live is a show that began in 2006, and focuses on local artists performing in front of a small audience. The show still runs on KBVR today.  The online release also includes a collection of videos from past events, including “Snow on the Quad,” a winter sports event that took place in the Memorial Union Quad in the middle of May, 2006. The event received news coverage by KGW Channel 8 News, was so popular that it continued into the subsequent years, before becoming the “Campus Rail Jam Tour” and concluding in 2011.

Also included is a large collection of short films produced by New Media Communications students from the 2000s to 2010s, including several produced by student Kevin England. Among these are several short films produced specifically by New Media Communications 383 students, as well as a full-length student film, Spade on the River, which is about a young, by-the-book man becoming roommates with the kind of guy he’d been warned about. The short films collection displays the work of talented young students who shared a love for storytelling through this new medium.

This collection of items from the KBVR television and radio stations display the kind of passion that is prominent among Beavers. Whether it’s a passion for music, sharing their views, making their audience laugh, or even taking their own spin on a popular TV show, Beavers are creative, and they know how to show it. The 241 video and audio clips presented in this collection will be an excellent source of inspiration for future Beavers in this regard. Not only that, but the clips are a source for historical inquiry, including news stories documenting past events and campus happenings, and sports coverage of past match-ups. This collection will also provide a nostalgic way to look back on projects produced by previous Beavers–whether they produced, anchored, starred in, or filmed a KBVR production, their memories are now available. It is no doubt that these videos will continue to be a source of past university events, humor, and inspiration for years to come.


This post was contributed by Student Archivist Katy Roach, a history major with the goal pursue a career in the archives.

March 2019 Guide Additions to SCARC Collections

SCARC completed 7 new or updated finding aids in March 2019.  Following is a list and a little information about what we accomplished.  These finalized finding aids are available through the Archives West finding aids database, and the OSUL discovery system (a.k.a. “the catalog”). 

All of these materials are now available to researchers.

Collections that were only minimally described and are now fully processed and described:
Robert W. Henderson Photographic Slides Collection, 1936-1998 (P 098 – SG 1)
The Robert W. Henderson Photographic Slides provide visual documentation of Oregon State University and the state of Oregon from, in bulk, the mid-1950s to the late 1990s. Consisting of nearly 16,000 unique 35-mm color slides, all of which are described individually, the collection depicts a wide range of university activities, particularly as concerns agricultural research and the development of agricultural practices at OSU’s county Extension offices and regional Experiment Stations. Other strengths of the collection include faculty, staff and student life at OSU; Oregon’s rural communities as viewed from the ground and the air; and imagery from Henderson’s travels around the world. Photos of coins, insects, flowers, produce and numerous other subjects round out the collection. Robert Henderson (1914-2006) was an OSU alum and photography enthusiast who worked as a faculty member in Farm Crops and the Agricultural Experiment Station for thirty years.

Larry Kirkland Photograph Collection, 1951-1969 (P 125)
The Larry Kirkland Photograph Collection documents activities related to school spirit, athletics, and student social life at Oregon State University (OSU). Kirkland began his undergraduate work at OSU in 1968, studying art and working in the Instructional Materials and Research Center. Kirkland completed an Honors Bachelor of Science in Environmental Design in 1972.  Images from this collection have been digitized and are available in Oregon Digital.

C. William Nelson Papers, 1958-1990 (MSS NelsonCW)
The C. William Nelson Papers document Nelson’s field collecting and research study of insects, especially moths and butterflies, in Oregon and Washington.  C. William Nelson was an avocational entomologist and insect collector who lived in the Portland, Oregon, metropolitan area.

 

New Collections:
Gail Achterman Papers, 1975-2012 (MSS Achterman)
The Gail Achterman Papers consist of materials created by Oregon State University Institute of Natural Resources’ creator and director Gail Achterman. Achterman led the institute from 2003 to 2011 and was renowned in the areas of natural resources and environmental law and policy. The collection chiefly consists of journals related to the Institute of Natural Resources and educational materials she shared during her time as director, as well as items pertaining to the Gail Achterman Willamette Legacy.

Fred Bowman Papers, 1983-2010 (MSS Bowman)
Fred Bowman co-founded Portland Brewing Company in 1986. The Fred Bowman Papers include digitized versions of photographs showing the renovation of the original Portland Brewing location and early events at the brewery. The digitized documents include news articles, business documents, and a personal pocketbook with handwritten notes.The digitized photographs in this collection are available in Oregon Digital. These materials were provided to the Special Collections & Archives Research Center in 2015 for digitization. The original items have been retained by Bowman.

Fashion Organization Records, 1978-2012 (MSS FashionOrg)
The Fashion Organization Records consist of materials reflecting the activities and administration of the Oregon State University Fashion Organization (OSUFO) and are comprised of financial records, organizational records, correspondence, ephemera, newspaper clippings, audio-visual material, and photographs and slides. Previously known as the Fashion Group International-Student Chapter, OSUFO was a fee-funded student organization that organized fashion-related events on campus, including the annual Recycled Fashion Show. The group was established as the Fashion and Design Students club (FADS) in 1983, and disbanded sometime between 2012 and 2015.

Valley Library Art Collection, 1948-2018  (RG 297)
The Valley Library Art Collection Records document the artists and art represented in the Northwest Art Collection as well as the work of Betty LaDuke.  The Northwest Art Collection consists of more than 140 pieces of artwork that were installed in the Valley Library as part of the Oregon Percent for Art program at the time of major renovations of the Oregon State University Library in the late 1990s.

Pearl Spears Gray: OSU’s Director of Affirmative Action 1973-1987

Thanks to Mary Williams, SCARC student worker for this post on Dr. Pearl Spears Gray!

Screen Shot 2019-02-18 at 2.41.25 PM

Pearl Spears Gray, born August 19, 1945 in Selma, Alabama, worked with OSU as an instructor for the Education Department for the Portland Urban Teach Education Program and the Affirmative Action Director from the years 1973 to 1987.  Her time at the school allowed for great strides in the Affirmative Action program, and aided Oregon State in becoming a more diverse and inclusive campus.

Dr. Gray was born in Alabama but grew up and went to high school in Washington D.C. After graduating she attended Wilberforce University for her undergrad then Antioch Putney University, where she got her Master’s in Secondary Education with an emphasis on African American history. Dr. Gray then went on to teach government, history and sociology at different high schools in the Washington D.C. area from the years of 1968 to 1973. In 1969. She received a grant from Rockefeller Family fund to study at different African universities  such as University College Cape Coast, along with Ghana and University of Ibadan. During this time she met her then husband, Eddie Gray, and had two children, Don and David Gray.

She came to work for Oregon State University as an instructor for the Portland Urban Teaching program in 1973.  This program was a “cooperative effort between the OSU school of Education and the Portland public schools to train minority students in education for teach in urban schools”. After three years, Dr. Gray decided to move to Corvallis and take the position as Affirmative Action officer, where at the time there were 250 African American students. In an article from the Oregon Stater she states, “I view this office as a service to the university…we can broaden the awareness of the university population about what is discriminatory. We can be a source of information, a force of change, and in integral part of this university in terms of developing programs that speak to the needs of women and minorities.” Through her hard work and dedication she the Black Journal placed her on a list called “100 Most Influential Friends” in 1977. Around this same time, she began to create a report for Oregon State’s compliance with Title IX and found that there were some shortcomings in the athletic department, requiring that they change their department to be more inclusive.

During this time Dr. Gray was also working to complete her PhD. Between 1976-1979 she took multiple courses including Statistical Methods, Historiography, Anthropology of Africa, and Adv. Cultural Anthropology Reading & Conference. In 1985, she completed and presented her thesis African-American Folkloric Form and Function in Segregated One-Room Schools, earning her a PhD in Philosophy in Educational Foundations at Oregon State University.

In 1986, Dr. Gray was appointed as ACE Fellow, and was selected to spend most of her fellowship at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville. Oregon State granted her a two year leave in order to fulfill her fellowship, but she ultimately decides to take position offered to her as Associate Provost for Policy and Assistant to the President at the University of Virginia in 1987.

Dr. Pearl Spears Grey was and extremely active advocate for diversity in academia. During her career she was a part of Delta Sigma Theta and “instrumental in beginning a new chapter…at OSU”, a part of African Heritage Studies Association, National Council for Social Science, Associate for the Study of Negro Life & History, Daughter of Isis, Order of the Eastern Star, Urban League of R.I. (board member), and served on the Governor’s Commission on Black Affairs. She pushed Oregon State University to open the doors to those who were not originally given the opportunity and allowed them to feel accepted on a predominately white campus.

February 2019 Guide Additions to SCARC Collections

SCARC completed 10 new or updated finding aids in February 2019.  The following is a list and a little information about what we accomplished.  You will see a beer theme for this month!

These finalized finding aids are available through the Archives West finding aids database, and the OSUL discovery system (a.k.a. “the catalog”). These 39 guides represent  ~87 cubic feet of physical materials and 41+ Gbytes of electronic records and include ~2800 photographs.

All of these materials are now available to researchers.


Collections that were only minimally described and are now fully processed and described:

Herman T. Bohlman Photograph Collection, circa 1890 – 1928 (P 202)

p202-bicyclesb-600wThe Herman T. Bohlman Photograph Collection consists of images taken and assembled by Bohlman documenting bird species and his travels, primarily in the Pacific Northwest.  Bohlman was a lifelong friend and collaborator of renowned ornithologist, naturalist, and conservationist William L. Finley.   Many of the photographs are available online in the Oregon Digital collection Reuniting Finley and Bohlman.

Robert Daly Beer Publication Collection, 1978-2004 (MSS Daly)

daly-600wThe Robert Daly Beer Publication Collection is comprised of publications collected by Robert Daly about beer brewing, as well as guides to different varieties of beer found in the U.S. and worldwide. Included among the publications are several issues of the Oregon Brew Crew newsletter, which Daly edited.

 

Friendship Internationale Scrapbook, 1964-1977 (MSS FriendsInt)

mss-chatterclub-scrapbook-600wThe Friendship Internationale Scrapbook documents the programs and activities offered by this organization for the wives of male international students and staff as well as single international female students and staff at Oregon State University.  The organization was founded in 1964 as the Chatter Club and was active until 1979, when it merged with another organization to form Crossroads International.

Hop Research Council Records, 1943-2009 (MSS HRC)

hrc-600wThe Hop Research Council Records document its support of hops research projects. Much of the collection pertains to the development of new hop varieties and the management of hop diseases such as powdery mildew. The Hop Research Council was formed in 1979 to fund hop research by soliciting and providing funds for scientific investigation and research related to the agricultural production of quality hops in the United States.

Kenneth C. Minnick Papers, 1945-2000 (MSS Minnick)

p46-296-minnick-600wThe Kenneth C. Minnick Papers document Minnick’s career as the Benton County 4-H Extension Agent from 1947 to 1974 and his establishment of the roadside clean-up program in Benton County in the late 1960s.  Minnick earned B.S. (1939) and M.Ag. (1954) degrees from Oregon State College.

 

New Collections:

Denny Conn Papers, 1998-2017 (MSS Conn)

headshot2 0815Denny Conn is a homebrewer, author, educator, and advisor in the Oregon brewing community. The Denny Conn Papers is an all electronic collection and consists of born-digital materials (.mp3, video, documents) and items digitized by Conn. These materials document Conn’s work, including documentation related to Conn’s two books Experimental Homebrewing: Mad Science in the Pursuit of Great Beer (2014) and Homebrew All-Stars: Top Homebrewers Share Their Best Techniques and Recipes (2016).

Bonnie B. Hall Botanical Prints, 1989-2003 (MSS HallB)

b-hall-flags_newBonnie B. Hall Botanical Prints consist of serigraphic screen prints created by Bonnie Hall, a scientific illustrator and artist.  Hall was well known, particularly for her botanical prints and was a scientific illustrator for the Department of Entomology at Oregon State University from 1963 -1993.

Zoller Hop Company Records, 1900-2006 (MSS Zoller)

zoller hop farm imageThe Zoller Hop Company Records consists of records and materials created and assembled throughout the first half of the 20th century. The collection contains records of business operations: correspondence and management files, photographs of fields and community events, and digitized versions of two films.  The Zoller Hop Company was located in Independence, Oregon, the “Hop Capital of the World’ during the first half of the 20th century. The company was later owned by Donal MacCarthy and the name was changed to “D.P. MacCarthy & Son.”  The two films have been digitized and are available online: “Spring hop field operations and fall harvest,” 1931 and “Harvesting and processing,” 1945.

Updated Guides:

William L. Finley Papers, 1899-1955 (MSS Finley)

mssfinley-birds-cap-600wThe William L. Finley Papers document the wildlife conservation work of Finley and his wife Irene, and the photography work of Herman T. Bohlman, who worked with Finley in the first decade of the 20th century. Finley was a photographer, filmmaker, and author who wrote and lectured extensively on wildlife conservation issues. The collection includes published and unpublished manuscripts, lecture and field notes, reports, correspondence, photographs, and motion picture films.  Manuscript items and photographs from this collection have been digitized and are available in Oregon Digital. All of the films held in the collection are also available online.

Thomas B. Searcy Collection, 1889-2013 (MSS Searcy)

mss-searcy-600wThe Thomas B. Searcy Collection documents the land in Sherman County, Oregon, homesteaded by Thomas B. Searcy in 1889; Searcy’s financial interactions with the Moro Grain Growers Association and the Pacific Co-operative Wool Growers Association; and the Searcy family.

Jeanne Dost, Economics, and Women at OSU

Thanks to SCARC student Mary Williams for this post on Jeanne Dost, who among many other things was a Professor of Economics and Director of Women’s Center AND Director of Women Studies. 

Cover of "The Birth of the Women's Center," MSS MC 57.20: Dost, Jeanne, 1990.

Cover of “The Birth of the Women’s Center,” MSS MC 57.20: Dost, Jeanne, 1990.

Born in Walla Walla, Washington on August 12, 1929, Jeanne Dost is well known as the warrior at the front lines of women’s rights in the state of Oregon’s universities. She spent most of her career fighting for her rights on Oregon State’s campus opening up opportunities for all women entering the world of academia.  Dr. Dost came to OSU in 1967 as a part-time Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics and was given the title of Professor Emeritus when she retired in 1991 after helping to start the Women Studies program and Women’s center.

Jeanne and Frank Dost married in 1950 after meeting at Washington State University where she completed her undergraduate degree in Economics.  From there the two moved to Massachusetts for Dr. Dost to complete her A.M. in Economics at Harvard University between the years if 1951 and 1953.  Once obtaining her graduate degree, Dr. Dost continued to work for her PhD at the same university, which she completed six years after her A.M. Between the years of 1953 to 1959, she worked as a Research Assistant at Harvard, an Instructor in Economics at Kansas State, and gave birth to her two children Karen, 1955, and Frederick, 1959. Finally, the family found their way to the Pacific Northwest when Dr. Dost acquired as position as an instructor at Washington State University in Economics.     

The Dost’s ultimately came to Oregon State University when they were both offered positions in their field of academia, but Dr. Dost was only hired as a part-time instructor for Introductory Economics.  This differed highly from her other at WSU, where she recalls teaching graduate level courses. From the years 1967 to 1972 she attempted to be hired in a full-time position as an Associate Professor for Economics.  In 1969, the opportunity arose when a position opened up for a full-time Associate Professor in Regional and Urban Economics, which she focused on when study for her PhD at Harvard. With multiple years of experience, involvement in different committees, and a vast education background, it was easy to assume that she would get the job. To her dismay, Dr. Dost was passed up for a man who was completing his Master’s degree in economics, and only after he decided to pass on the offer she was offered the position at part-time.  After this she began to research the treatment of female faculty for University of Oregon, Oregon State, and Portland State, to see if this was a common flow in Oregon’s academia. She returned with dismal results which showed how widespread this epidemics was. For Jeanne Dost, this was blatant sex discrimination and she voiced her opinion, to which she was fired soon after.

She formerly filed a complaint about the ordeal with Oregon State’s Faculty Review and Appeals Committee, the Federal Department of Health, Education and Welfare, and Oregon’s Bureau of Labor Civil Rights Division.  Oregon State’s Faculty Review and Appeals Committee found to no discrimination based on sex but rather on personality, claiming that she was considered “pushy” from others in the department, meaning they felt nothing needed to be down. In late 1971 though, the Bureau of Labor Civil Rights deemed it as obvious sex discrimination and highly recommended they hire Dr. Dost as a full-time Associate Professor with tenure. Six months later she was hired in that role but without tenure.

After this experience Dr. Dost knew there needed to a change on campus, she and colleagues advocated for the Women’s Center which opened the academic year of 1972-1973. In August 1973 she and the OSU President, were about able to create a position for her as Director of Women’s Center and Director of Women Studies. From there she pushed for the much needed change by making the Women Studies program grow so much that by 1978, a student could gain a graduate degree in the program.

Dr. Dost continued to make change on Oregon State’s campus until her retirement as Emeritus Professor in 1991.  Although she continued to be involved, her experiences left Jeanne Dost with a bad taste in her mouth when it came to OSU.  She decided to remove herself from the university completely, offering all of her works to the Archives at the University of Oregon.  After her retirement, she and her husband Frank moved to the British Columbia for about four years but finally settled into a home in Freeland, Washington around 1995.  During her retirement she wrote the book Women: Two Decades of Discovery where she examined the wage gap and other economic disparities between the sexes. Dr. Jeanne Dost passed away in 2012 from Leukemia and Alzheimers and is survived but her loving family, Frank, Karen and Frederick.