THIS POST WAS LAST UPDATED ON THURSDAY, DEC. 1, AT 8:00 P.M.

An updated timeline and FAQ regarding the abatement and deconstruction of Peavy Hall can be found below. Please be sure to visit the full FAQ and feel free to submit a question!

What does the deconstruction schedule look like for the next few weeks?

Below you will find an updated tentative schedule for the deconstruction of Peavy Hall and the re-roofing of Richardson Hall through the next to last week of December. Please note dates are estimated and subject to change.

THREE WEEK LOOK AHEAD FOR PEAVY/KNUCKLE

Peavy Hall Demolition and Salvage

Dec. 5th – 23rd

  • Demolition of the Mechanical Room
    • Cutting metal piping in the loading area – Loud
  • Breaking out the slab on grade and footing with trackhoe hammer
    • Loud and vibrating
  • Hauling concrete and metal off site

Knuckle at Richardson Hall

Dec. 5th – 23rd

  • Chipping out footings and slab first floor.
    • Loud and vibrating. Heavy hitting. Disruptions through at least Jan. 9th.
    • Sealing concrete walls on Dec. 9, which will hopefully lessen the sound.
  • Form and pouring footings

THREE WEEK LOOK AHEAD FOR RICHARDSON HALL

Richardson Hall Re-Roof

Dec. 5th – 9th

  • Area 05 – South West Wing
    • Final metal flashings on the parapet
  • Final Owner walk through Dec. 7th

 

A timeline regarding the abatement and deconstruction of Peavy Hall can be found below. Please be sure to visit the full FAQ and feel free to submit a question!

What is the timeline for the abatement and deconstruction of Peavy Hall?

The abatement and deconstruction of Peavy Hall will run from July 2016 to mid-October 2016. Click the links below for the full schedule, protective fence outlines, and additional notes.

The latest round of new questions and answers about the Peavy Hall Transition can be found below.

How much would it cost to address deferred maintenance issues at existing Peavy, and what would that do?

The estimated cost to address deferred maintenance on existing Peavy Hall is approximately $10 million and growing.  Those repairs would address the leaking roof, asbestos abatement in some (but not all areas), limited repair and update existing mechanical systems, and limited ADA improvements (primarily to restrooms).  This amount would address nothing else associated with renovating, remodeling, or improving conditions in Peavy.

What was the estimated cost of remodeling and renovating existing Peavy and what would that have addressed?

The Feasibility Study conducted in 2014-2015 included a cost estimate that examined both renovating and modernizing existing Peavy, and building a new Peavy as conceptualized at the time.  The renovation estimate assumed partial day lighting the basement space and enclosing the courtyard of current Peavy Hall.  It did not fully address accessibility issues between Richardson and Peavy Halls. The “new” Peavy envisioned constructing sufficient space to meet current and projected program needs identified in work group meetings conducted by the design team with faculty and staff.

The Feasibility Study estimate projected building New Peavy on the same site as existing Peavy would result in a savings range from approximately $27,000 to $3.2 million depending on assumptions regarding building design. That estimate was updated in February 2016 using costing data specific to the building as it is currently designed, and projected a savings from building new over remodel of approximately $205,000.

Both estimates were completed by the general contractor on the project (Walsh Construction), and included site work and demolition costs associated with each option.  The most recent estimate provided an “apples to apples” comparison of specific “hard” construction costs showing a project cost for renovation at approximately $44,197,920 vs $43,992,440 for a new building; this estimate came with the caveat that renovation carried many unknown and unquantified risks with potentially significant implications for the project budget.

What is the cost of building a new Peavy separate from AWP Lab and soft (contingency) project costs?

The “hard” construction cost for this and other capital construction projects are known as Contract Management and General Contractor Costs (“CM/GM”). This figure represents the budget provided to the Contractor to build the structure as it has been designed. It includes some allowances for contingencies and cost escalation, but does not include “soft” or indirect costs such as permit fees, design and professional service fees, FFE (Fixtures, Furnishings, and Equipment) for the new building, internal (OSU) expenses associated with the project (such as temporary relocation and moving costs), financing costs, and a set aside for unexpected project expenses.

In order to leverage cost efficiencies in design, materials, and construction, both buildings are treated as a single project with a not-to-exceed CM/GC budget of $52.5.  Of that amount, the approximate target CM/GM cost for the New Peavy building is $40,071,627 including site work and project related renovations to Richardson Hall.  The approximate target CM/GC cost for the new Advanced Wood Products Laboratory is $11,426,731 including site work.  These costs are being adjusted and recalculated at specific intervals in the design process.  New cost estimates moving us closer to the final project cost will be calculated in April.

Couldn’t we have built new Peavy either as an addition to Richardson (in the parking lot), or in the rugby field across Jefferson?

New Peavy could not have been constructed in the parking lot west of Richardson because much of the area is subject to terms of a long-term lease agreement with the U.S. Forest Service.  While available, the parking lot south of Richardson was not considered a viable site based on additional project expenses associated with new and replacement parking (estimated at approximately $1.5 million), as well as additional underground utility costs not incurred when utilizing the existing Peavy site location.

The field north of Jefferson is not an available building site per direction from the OSU Campus Masterplan.  Under that plan, the open space is to be preserved during this building cycle, but is anticipated for use as future building sites. Modification of the Masterplan is a lengthy and resource-intensive process with an uncertain outcome. If attained, it would result in physically dividing functions of the College into two locations.

College Administration none-the-less investigated this alternative location late in 2015 as a potential cost savings alternative for the project.  The Dean requested a generalized costing analysis to determine if potential savings to CM/GC costs would merit a more detailed assessment and inquiry. The “ballpark estimate” of savings and costs provided to the College by University Facilities and Site Planning staff indicated an anticipated $1,005,000 million in additional costs associated with building on the rugby field site — primarily from additional site work to provide access to below-ground utilities already accessible at the existing Peavy location, and the addition of approximately 60 new parking spaces necessary to meet City code provisions.  This alternative was set aside based on this estimate, project delay, and uncertain outcomes.

When was the decision made to build new instead of a remodel, and who made it?

The notion of undertaking a capital construction project to renovate Peavy Hall was first raised in June, 2013, by members of the College Board of Visitors, which is comprised of philanthropic partners who actively support College programs.   The same group provided funding for a Feasibility Study that began in the fall of 2013 and concluded in the summer of 2014.   It was during the study the Advanced Wood Products Laboratory was added to the project as a separate building, and the potential for constructing a new Peavy Hall building was introduced as a viable, cost-effective alternative to a complete renovation of existing Peavy Hall.  Both options were presented to the Board of Visitors meeting that summer, and it was agreed to keep both options on the table into the Pre-Design phase so more costing detail would be available.

By late 2014, it became clear to meet the program goals (including College expansion) identified by faculty and staff, building a new Peavy Hall was the most viable option presented by the design team. It would maximize flexibility and efficiency of active program space, reduce the time of construction during which the College would be relocated, and reduce the risk of cost and time overruns due to unexpected problems associated with the complete renovation and reconstruction for existing Peavy Hall.  The Dean consulted with the University Architect, Facilities staff, and Board of Visitors before directing the design team to shift the focus of the faculty/staff working group discussions from renovation to construction of a new building.

The Conceptual Design process then engaged faculty and staff with the design team on multiple occasions to focus on the parameters of building “new.” Conceptual design plans for a “New Peavy Hall” were then presented and discussed with faculty and staff at the All-College meeting held in May 2015, and the Board of Visitors soon thereafter; these discussions led to a final decision to build a new building that summer.

What is the plan for demolition, re-use, recycling of building materials from existing Peavy?

The existing Peavy Hall will be “deconstructed” which is an extensive process involving removal and proper disposal of hazardous materials (primarily asbestos and lead), reutilization of primary and secondary structural elements for use in New Peavy (glulam beams and purlins), and recycling concrete, steel/rebar, and the remaining wood elements.  The purpose is to respect the Peavy wood structure heritage and responsibly decommission the building to minimize waste.  It is anticipated approximately 3% of the building mass will be removed as hazardous materials, 20% of the building mass will be repurposed into new Peavy, 65% of the building mass will be sorted and recycled, and the remaining 12% will be landfilled.  Interior furnishings will be sold for reuse.

New Peavy has fewer classrooms than exiting Peavy. Do we have enough classroom spaces to teach COF courses and to grow future offerings?

Yes.  Current Peavy classrooms, while more in number than planned for new Peavy, were frequently unscheduled and empty.  The classroom planning process for New Peavy began by evaluating the size and number of classes offered by the College.  An additional 25% growth factor was added to the current offerings, and classrooms were sized to match the range of capacity needed to accommodate our typical class sizes.  This led to the decision to include the different sizes and configurations of the classrooms included in the current design.

A related question was whether time conflicts would be numerous and cause cascading changes in course scheduling to fit an efficient classroom allocation scheme.  The analysis conducted indicated some time changes for individual sections will need to be made, but they are not substantial.  Also, the new classroom building opened by the University is available for use and will provide more scheduling flexibility. All classrooms in the current design will either be scheduled by the College, or reserved for the College sponsored classes first before being made available to others on campus.

Is there really less lab space in the new Peavy than the existing Peavy? If so, why?

Current Peavy has roughly 7,800 square feet of research labs, and about 1,500 square feet of teaching labs. Of the research lab space, about 2500 square feet is occupied by CCAL and the IWW Collaboratory, which serve constituencies across the University as well as federal agency clients, and was housed here at the College. After extensive discussions, both CCAL and the IWW Collaboratory are being relocated into permanent new locations in the Oak Creek Laboratory complex that will keep them co-located and managed by Kathy Motter.  A substantial shared investment from OSU, our college, and partner colleges is being made to renovate the Oak Creek spaces for these two lab facilities.

After deducting the square footage occupied by CCAL and the Collaboratory, current Peavy has about 5,300 square feet of research lab space dedicated to our programs. In addition, some current Peavy research labs include offices that are occupied by FRAs and research support personnel. New Peavy accounts for these individuals in offices outside of dedicated lab space. New Peavy, by comparison, will include more than 7,100 square feet of research lab space.

Finally, lab space in New Peavy will be mostly “dry” research labs, and more than 1,250 square feet of mostly “dry” teaching labs. These new labs are state of the art and are being designed as shared functional labs. Efforts have been made to shift “wet” lab needs to Richardson Hall to efficiently use chemical fume hoods already installed there.  The result is that most of the “wet” labs in current Peavy are being transitioned to Richardson Hall, and more “dry” lab functions will be designed into the New Peavy. We hope one benefit of this approach will be more interaction and potential for collaboration among faculty across departments in the College, especially in soils, fire, silviculture, and ecology.

Does new Peavy account for plans to grow the college by having more space for faculty, staff, and graduate student offices? And if so, is that because the offices are going to be smaller in new Peavy than existing Peavy?

Yes the design accounts for growth. The number of offices included in the plans for New Peavy is based on a process that engaged each department and every work unit in the College, whether housed in Peavy or Richardson. The process accounted for existing office space needs, unmet current needs, and reasonably anticipated additions to staff and faculty positions.  Those needs were identified by the different departments and work units, with lead managers and department heads signing off on final tallies. Space designated for graduate students was expanded by approximately 18% and configured to allow easy transition to faculty offices at a future time should the need arise.  Accommodating this anticipated growth within in a similar gross square footage was possible because the new building efficiently utilizes space for program needs in ways existing Peavy could not (even with renovation) because of its configuration and the percentage of space below grade (approximately 43%).

Space allocated to staff and faculty is based on the College space policy and the standard designated by the University for different job functions.  Each faculty office in New Peavy will be approximately 120 square feet, as compared to an average of approximately 112 square feet in existing Peavy.  Because the variation in office sizes in existing Peavy will be standardized in New Peavy, some staff and faculty in private offices may see a reduction in workspace, some may be assigned a shared office, and a few may be assigned cubicles based on consistent application of the College space policy across New Peavy and Richardson Halls.  All office spaces in New Peavy will be newly furnished to help maximize workspace and efficiency.

Why do we say New Peavy will be a “green” building?  The carbon footprint of demolition and new construction is greater than remodeling.

The simple answer to this question is that New Peavy will be a “green” building and a project that embodies the tenants of “sustainability” even if the carbon footprint of the project turns out to be greater because it is new construction rather than a renovation of the existing structure.  Both the question and the answer, however, need to take much more into account than the single story of carbon.

No building (renovated or new) can have a zero environmental impact no matter our ambition.  Instead, the design and construction of buildings is an exercise in balancing a set of relevant values, while setting the bar as high as possible for choosing the most responsible path for meeting a given project’s program needs and budget capabilities.

The decision to replace Peavy was a challenging one and was reached after more than a year of investigation into all of the issues associated with renovation vs building new. Throughout the process, the University, College leadership, College, focus groups, and the Design and Construction team sought to capture and balance environmental, educational, social, cultural, and economic factors to reach decisions that will offer the College of Forestry a long-term solution for a next generation academic teaching, research, and learning environment.  In all, approximately 70 meetings have been conducted since 2014 by the design team with College faculty, staff, and students to ensure our building project will meet the identified needs.

While the carbon footprint story of new construction is often (but not always) greater than that associated with renovating existing structures, our framework for balancing different factors reached far beyond the calculation of carbon footprint. Design decisions highly valued the equality created by having a building with greater accessibility to all users, and one that will provide long-term program and teaching flexibility. High value was also placed on creating a built environment that will foster social and cultural connections, provide daylight and natural ventilation to all work spaces (43% of existing Peavy is below grade), and ensure the health and well-being of employees and students. Planning decisions have also prioritized minimizing and managing economic risk to the college from both project completion uncertainties and long-term occupancy costs.   All these priorities were balanced with environmental considerations to collectively determine the best path for the project.

In the context of this balance, the environmental performance of New Peavy as a “green” building will be measured using third party certification standards (the building will meet or exceed LEED Silver standards), as well as performance-based evaluation tools that look at carbon, energy and water use efficiency, and material toxicity.  The College has also committed to completing a Life Cycle Assessment with documented Environmental Building Declarations for the project that will consider: the impact of removing and recycling existing Peavy; the impact of new materials and construction; the impact of energy during construction and the duration of the life of the building; and finally, the impact of final deconstruction at the end of the new building’s life.  On this final part of the project, our plan is to pair the design team and project contractor with College faculty to frame and guide this assessment with transparency and integrity. There is also room for implementing mitigation strategies that arise as this assessment unfolds.

What plan is in place to ensure ongoing maintenance and upkeep of the new building over time?

The University requires all new building projects to have an established and dedicated “Stewardship” fund.  The College, through our Board of Visitors, has established this fund for New Peavy Hall.  It will address ongoing and long-term maintenance of the structure.  Approximately $135,000 will be placed in the fund annually.

Updated answers (including adjusted timeline) and new questions about the Peavy Hall Transition can be found below. Please visit the full FAQ and feel free to submit a question!

What is the new construction timeline?

April 2016 – Final design completed

June/July, 2016 – Move out of Peavy Hall to temporary locations and demolition/construction begins.

March, 2018 – New building completed! Move into new, permanent locations.

When will we learn about whether or not we have to move to a temporary location?

Please check with your assigned move coordinator for an update on your temporary location.

When will Peavy Hall classrooms close?

It is anticipated we will be using classroom space through 2016 Spring term.

When will all lab spaces have to be out of Peavy Hall? Where will they go?

Everything needs to be out of Peavy Hall by the end of the 2016 Spring term. Please check with your move coordinator to check the status on temporary locations for lab spaces.

What is the construction timeline?

Demolition of the existing Peavy Hall is scheduled for Summer 2016, with completion scheduled for Spring 2018.

Will there be a kitchenesque space in the new building with a sink to wash dishes?

The design process for the new building has begun and will be completed in April 2016. As soon as the design of the new building is ready to be released, it will be shared with the College.

Updated answers and new questions about the Peavy Hall Transition can be found below. Please visit the full FAQ and feel free to submit a question!

What will happen to the second floor lounge of Richardson Hall during the move and construction?

It is uncertain at this time what/when areas of Richardson Hall will be effected by the new construction. As soon as a schedule is created, we will let you know.

Will there be a kitchenesque space in the new building with a sink to wash dishes?

The design process for the new building will start soon. As soon as the design of the new building is ready to be released, it will be shared with the College.

Will there be resources available to help me move?

You are responsible for packing your office and the College will provide any supplies (boxes, tape, crates, labels, etc.) you might need. As we get closer to the move date, we will provide additional information about how we will move items from individual offices.

Will the College provide a complete list of archiving schedules, requirements, etc. for all types of materials (course syllabi, SET reports, scholarship materials, research data, HR records, etc.)? And when will that be provided?

Your work unit coordinator has the complete retention schedule.

Is there space available at College Research Forests or Extension?

The College Research Forests has one office space available while space at various Extension offices is not anticipated at this time.

 

The Oregon Forest Science Complex is opening in Spring 2018!

In the coming months, we will manage the details that accompany the move out of Peavy Hall, consolidate our use of space in Richardson Hall and the Oak Creek Building, and develop a plan to function as a College during the 18 months of construction.

Throughout the process, faculty and staff had the opportunity to ask questions surrounding the move. Answers can be found below; and, please keep checking this website for updates as they become available. If you would like to submit a question to add to this page, please submit this form.

Thanks!

Will the women’s restroom and the mechanical room in the basement of Richardson Hall be impacted and for how long?

When will the partition walls separating Richardson from the knuckle areas go up?

When will the knuckle demolition occur?

What is the timeline for the abatement and deconstruction of Peavy Hall?

How much would it cost to address deferred maintenance issues at existing Peavy, and what would that do?

What was the estimated cost of remodeling and renovating existing Peavy and what would that have addressed?

What is the cost of building a new Peavy separate from AWP Lab and soft (contingency) project costs?

Couldn’t we have built new Peavy either as an addition to Richardson (in the parking lot), or in the rugby field across Jefferson?

When was the decision made to build new instead of a remodel, and who made it?

What is the plan for demolition, re-use, recycling of building materials from existing Peavy?

New Peavy has fewer classrooms than exiting Peavy. Do we have enough classroom spaces to teach COF courses and to grow future offerings?

Is there really less lab space in the new Peavy than the existing Peavy? If so, why?

Does new Peavy account for plans to grow the college by having more space for faculty, staff, and graduate student offices? And if so, is that because the offices are going to be smaller in new Peavy than existing Peavy?

Why do we say New Peavy will be a “green” building?  The carbon footprint of demolition and new construction is greater than remodeling.

What plan is in place to ensure ongoing maintenance and upkeep of the new building over time?

Who is my move coordinator and what do they do?

When will we learn about whether or not we have to move to a temporary location?

When will we learn of our new office location following the completion of construction?

Will I be able to work from home during the construction process?

What if I purchase a parking permit and need to exchange it because it is not applicable for my new, temporary location?

Will somebody help me pack and move my office? Will I be able to move everything on our own?

Will there be resources available to help me move?

Will we be using COF personnel to do any of the packing or moving?

Will COF resources (i.e., IT, phone, business, etc.?) be available throughout the construction timeline?

Will I be able to receive campus mail at my temporary location?

Will members of my research team be placed in close proximity to one another during the construction process?

Is the Forest Science Laboratory remodeling at the same time?

Will OSU employees who work at the FSL be relocated to Peavy or Richardson during the move? After the move?

What is the plan for classrooms leading up to construction and until the new building is online?

Is there a plan to accommodate the unique teaching spaces in Peavy Hall?

Will we accommodate the instrument room throughout the move and construction?

What will happen with office space in Richardson Hall during construction?

How will Richardson Hall meeting and conference rooms be handled during construction?

What will happen to the second floor lounge of Richardson Hall during the move and construction?

What will we use for the lost meeting and conference space in Richardson?

Is there space available at College Research Forests or Extension?

Will there be help to surplus and recycle items?

What will happen to all of the art and furniture?

Will there be help for data/archive storage and recycling?

Will the College provide a complete list of archiving schedules, requirements, etc. for all types of materials (course syllabi, SET reports, scholarship materials, research data, HR records, etc.)? And when will that be provided?

Will we be provided archival information and policies from the institution?

Do we have high-speed scanners available to archive information?

What about my research storage needs?

Will the COF rent storage for me?

What is the construction timeline?

Will there be traffic and access changes around Richardson Hall during construction?

When will we be in the new building?

What is the new building going to be called?

Will there be a kitchenette space in the new building with a sink to wash dishes?

Who is my move coordinator and what do they do?

Your move coordinator is the point of contact to address information needs and requests of faculty and staff in each work unit. They will serve as the primary point of contact for each work unit on all move related issues.

Move coordinators are listed below:

FERM – Chelsey Durling

FES – Misty Magers

WSE – Angela Haney

Student Services – Kira Hughes

Advising – Nicole Kent

Computing – Mike Altimus

Business and HR – Penny Wright

Extension – Janey Lee-Sutton

Dean’s Office – Penny Wright

When will we learn about whether or not we have to move to a temporary location?

Temporary locations have been assigned. Please check with your move coordinator if you have any questions about your move date.

When will we learn of our new office location following the completion of construction?

At this time, we do not know. We will have a better idea of the timeline for assignment of new offices once the design of the new building is completed (July 2016) and construction begins (October 2016).

Will I be able to work from home during the construction process?

Yes. However, individuals will need to work with their supervisors to work out the logistics and details.

What if I purchase a parking permit and need to exchange it because it is not applicable for my new, temporary location?

It will be possible to exchange parking permits once your temporary location is known. If your new parking permit costs more than your current permit, you will have to pay the difference. If the exchanged permit costs less, you will be refunded the difference.

Will somebody help me pack and move my office? Will I be able to move everything on our own?

You are responsible for packing up your own office. Somebody will move your boxes to your temporary location. We recommend you utilize the moving services that will be available once your office is packed; however, if you feel the need to personally remove the items from your office, please discuss with you move coordinator.

Will there be resources available to help me move?

You are responsible for packing your office and the College will provide any supplies (boxes, tape, crates, labels, etc.) you might need. Please check with your move coordinator if you have additional questions about how to move items from individual offices.

Will we be using COF personnel to do any of the packing or moving?

We expect employees to pack their own offices; however, help will be available to move boxes and furniture out of all office spaces.

Will COF resources (i.e., IT, phone, business, etc.?) be available throughout the construction timeline?

Yes. All essential services will be up and running throughout the process.

Will I be able to receive campus mail at my temporary location?

You will receive campus mail at or near your temporary location. Please check with your move coordinator to confirm location.

Will members of my research team be placed in close proximity to one another during the construction process?

Yes, that is our goal. We will do our best to keep research teams and working groups together.

Is the Forest Science Laboratory remodeling at the same time?

Yes.

Will OSU employees who work at the Forest Science Lab be relocated to Peavy or Richardson during the move? After the move?

We do not know temporary locations at this time. In addition, we do not know about new, permanent locations following the conclusion of construction.

What is the plan for classrooms leading up to construction and until the new building is online?

Existing OSU classroom space throughout the entire campus will be utilized for a majority of our classes.

Is there a plan to accommodate the unique teaching spaces in Peavy Hall?

Yes. We are working on accommodating these unique spaces and will have more information in the coming months.

 

Will we accommodate the instrument room throughout the move and construction?

Yes. The temporary location for the instrument room will be at the north entrance of Richardson Hall across from the rugby fields.

What will happen with office space in Richardson Hall during construction?

We don’t anticipate there will be major issues in regards to Richardson Hall office space. However, it is possible some changes could be made on an individual basis.

How will Richardson Hall meeting and conference rooms be handled during construction?

A majority of meeting and conference space in Richardson Hall will likely be repurposed during construction. RH 107 will become a classroom and its anticipated RH 201Q will be unavailable at times during the process.

What will happen to the second-floor lounge of Richardson Hall during the move and construction?

The second-floor knuckle of Richardson Hall is scheduled for deconstruction in the middle of September. Services in the lounge will likely go away a few weeks before that time.

What will we use for the lost meeting and conference space in Richardson?

RH 115 and 319 will remain available for meetings. We will transition RH 109 into a small meeting space. Faculty, staff, and students are encouraged to look for alternative meeting spaces throughtout campus.

Is there space available at College Research Forests or Extension?

The College Research Forests has one office space available while space at various Extension offices is not anticipated at this time.

Will there be help to surplus and recycle items?

Yes. If you need assistance or have questions about surplus and recycling, contact your move coordinator.

What will happen to all of the art and furniture?

A majority of the art and furniture in Peavy and Richardson are considered University property. Any art or furniture owned by the University will be unavailable for personal use away from campus. We are currently taking inventory and will know more about permanent locations for art and furniture as we get closer to the move date. We hope to replace old, worn out Richardson furniture with some of our better Peavy furniture. Finally, we do know that any University furniture that is not moved into the new building or Richardson will be given to surplus.

Will there be help for data/archive storage and recycling?

Yes. Discuss your needs with your move coordinator.

Will the College provide a complete list of archiving schedules, requirements, etc. for all types of materials (course syllabi, SET reports, scholarship materials, research data, HR records, etc.)? And when will that be provided?

Your work unit coordinator has the complete retention schedule.

Will we be provided archival information and policies from the institution?

Yes. Discuss with your move coordinator if you have any questions.

Do we have high-speed scanners available to archive information?

If you have this need, please discuss with your move coordinator.

What about my research storage needs?

We are currently analyzing our research storage capacity. We will be asking that you look at your current research and digitize files when possible. If unable to convert research to a digital format, we will work with you to find an appropriate solution.

Will the COF rent storage for me?

Please contact your move coordinator to discuss.

What is the construction timeline?

Demolition of the existing Peavy Hall is scheduled for Summer 2016, with completion scheduled for Spring 2018.

Will there be traffic and access changes around Richardson Hall during construction?

Yes. We will keep you informed as we get closer to the start of construction.

When will we be in the new building?

The new building will be ready and operational by the start of the 2018 Spring term.

What is the new building going to be called?

A name for the new building has not been decided at this time.

Will there be a kitchenette space in the new building with a sink to wash dishes?

The design process for the new building has begun and will be completed in July 2016. As soon as the design of the new building is ready to be released, it will be shared with the College.

How much would it cost to address deferred maintenance issues at existing Peavy, and what would that do?

The estimated cost to address deferred maintenance on existing Peavy Hall is approximately $10 million and growing.  Those repairs would address the leaking roof, asbestos abatement in some (but not all areas), limited repair and update existing mechanical systems, and limited ADA improvements (primarily to restrooms).  This amount would address nothing else associated with renovating, remodeling, or improving conditions in Peavy.

What was the estimated cost of remodeling and renovating existing Peavy and what would that have addressed?

The Feasibility Study conducted in 2014-2015 included a cost estimate that examined both renovating and modernizing existing Peavy, and building a new Peavy as conceptualized at the time.  The renovation estimate assumed partial day lighting the basement space and enclosing the courtyard of current Peavy Hall.  It did not fully address accessibility issues between Richardson and Peavy Halls. The “new” Peavy envisioned constructing sufficient space to meet current and projected program needs identified in work group meetings conducted by the design team with faculty and staff.

The Feasibility Study estimate projected building New Peavy on the same site as existing Peavy would result in a savings range from approximately $27,000 to $3.2 million depending on assumptions regarding building design. That estimate was updated in February 2016 using costing data specific to the building as it is currently designed, and projected a savings from building new over remodel of approximately $205,000.

Both estimates were completed by the general contractor on the project (Walsh Construction), and included site work and demolition costs associated with each option.  The most recent estimate provided an “apples to apples” comparison of specific “hard” construction costs showing a project cost for renovation at approximately $44,197,920 vs $43,992,440 for a new building; this estimate came with the caveat that renovation carried many unknown and unquantified risks with potentially significant implications for the project budget.

What is the cost of building a new Peavy separate from AWP Lab and soft (contingency) project costs?

The “hard” construction cost for this and other capital construction projects are known as Contract Management and General Contractor Costs (“CM/GM”). This figure represents the budget provided to the Contractor to build the structure as it has been designed. It includes some allowances for contingencies and cost escalation, but does not include “soft” or indirect costs such as permit fees, design and professional service fees, FFE (Fixtures, Furnishings, and Equipment) for the new building, internal (OSU) expenses associated with the project (such as temporary relocation and moving costs), financing costs, and a set aside for unexpected project expenses.

In order to leverage cost efficiencies in design, materials, and construction, both buildings are treated as a single project with a not-to-exceed CM/GC budget of $52.5.  Of that amount, the approximate target CM/GM cost for the New Peavy building is $40,071,627 including site work and project related renovations to Richardson Hall.  The approximate target CM/GC cost for the new Advanced Wood Products Laboratory is $11,426,731 including site work.  These costs are being adjusted and recalculated at specific intervals in the design process.  New cost estimates moving us closer to the final project cost will be calculated in April.

Couldn’t we have built new Peavy either as an addition to Richardson (in the parking lot), or in the rugby field across Jefferson?

New Peavy could not have been constructed in the parking lot west of Richardson because much of the area is subject to terms of a long-term lease agreement with the U.S. Forest Service.  While available, the parking lot south of Richardson was not considered a viable site based on additional project expenses associated with new and replacement parking (estimated at approximately $1.5 million), as well as additional underground utility costs not incurred when utilizing the existing Peavy site location.

The field north of Jefferson is not an available building site per direction from the OSU Campus Masterplan.  Under that plan, the open space is to be preserved during this building cycle, but is anticipated for use as future building sites. Modification of the Masterplan is a lengthy and resource-intensive process with an uncertain outcome. If attained, it would result in physically dividing functions of the College into two locations.

College Administration none-the-less investigated this alternative location late in 2015 as a potential cost savings alternative for the project.  The Dean requested a generalized costing analysis to determine if potential savings to CM/GC costs would merit a more detailed assessment and inquiry. The “ballpark estimate” of savings and costs provided to the College by University Facilities and Site Planning staff indicated an anticipated $1,005,000 million in additional costs associated with building on the rugby field site — primarily from additional site work to provide access to below-ground utilities already accessible at the existing Peavy location, and the addition of approximately 60 new parking spaces necessary to meet City code provisions.  This alternative was set aside based on this estimate, project delay, and uncertain outcomes.

When was the decision made to build new instead of a remodel, and who made it?

The notion of undertaking a capital construction project to renovate Peavy Hall was first raised in June, 2013, by members of the College Board of Visitors, which is comprised of philanthropic partners who actively support College programs.   The same group provided funding for a Feasibility Study that began in the fall of 2013 and concluded in the summer of 2014.   It was during the study the Advanced Wood Products Laboratory was added to the project as a separate building, and the potential for constructing a new Peavy Hall building was introduced as a viable, cost-effective alternative to a complete renovation of existing Peavy Hall.  Both options were presented to the Board of Visitors meeting that summer, and it was agreed to keep both options on the table into the Pre-Design phase so more costing detail would be available.

By late 2014, it became clear to meet the program goals (including College expansion) identified by faculty and staff, building a new Peavy Hall was the most viable option presented by the design team. It would maximize flexibility and efficiency of active program space, reduce the time of construction during which the College would be relocated, and reduce the risk of cost and time overruns due to unexpected problems associated with the complete renovation and reconstruction for existing Peavy Hall.  The Dean consulted with the University Architect, Facilities staff, and Board of Visitors before directing the design team to shift the focus of the faculty/staff working group discussions from renovation to construction of a new building.

The Conceptual Design process then engaged faculty and staff with the design team on multiple occasions to focus on the parameters of building “new.” Conceptual design plans for a “New Peavy Hall” were then presented and discussed with faculty and staff at the All-College meeting held in May 2015, and the Board of Visitors soon thereafter; these discussions led to a final decision to build a new building that summer.

What is the plan for demolition, re-use, recycling of building materials from existing Peavy?

The existing Peavy Hall will be “deconstructed” which is an extensive process involving removal and proper disposal of hazardous materials (primarily asbestos and lead), reutilization of primary and secondary structural elements for use in New Peavy (glulam beams and purlins), and recycling concrete, steel/rebar, and the remaining wood elements.  The purpose is to respect the Peavy wood structure heritage and responsibly decommission the building to minimize waste.  It is anticipated approximately 3% of the building mass will be removed as hazardous materials, 20% of the building mass will be repurposed into new Peavy, 65% of the building mass will be sorted and recycled, and the remaining 12% will be landfilled.  Interior furnishings will be sold for reuse.

New Peavy has fewer classrooms than exiting Peavy. Do we have enough classroom spaces to teach COF courses and to grow future offerings?

Yes.  Current Peavy classrooms, while more in number than planned for new Peavy, were frequently unscheduled and empty.  The classroom planning process for New Peavy began by evaluating the size and number of classes offered by the College.  An additional 25% growth factor was added to the current offerings, and classrooms were sized to match the range of capacity needed to accommodate our typical class sizes.  This led to the decision to include the different sizes and configurations of the classrooms included in the current design.

A related question was whether time conflicts would be numerous and cause cascading changes in course scheduling to fit an efficient classroom allocation scheme.  The analysis conducted indicated some time changes for individual sections will need to be made, but they are not substantial.  Also, the new classroom building opened by the University is available for use and will provide more scheduling flexibility. All classrooms in the current design will either be scheduled by the College, or reserved for the College sponsored classes first before being made available to others on campus.

Is there really less lab space in the new Peavy than the existing Peavy? If so, why?

Current Peavy has roughly 7,800 square feet of research labs, and about 1,500 square feet of teaching labs. Of the research lab space, about 2500 square feet is occupied by CCAL and the IWW Collaboratory, which serve constituencies across the University as well as federal agency clients, and was housed here at the College. After extensive discussions, both CCAL and the IWW Collaboratory are being relocated into permanent new locations in the Oak Creek Laboratory complex that will keep them co-located and managed by Kathy Motter.  A substantial shared investment from OSU, our college, and partner colleges is being made to renovate the Oak Creek spaces for these two lab facilities.

After deducting the square footage occupied by CCAL and the Collaboratory, current Peavy has about 5,300 square feet of research lab space dedicated to our programs. In addition, some current Peavy research labs include offices that are occupied by FRAs and research support personnel. New Peavy accounts for these individuals in offices outside of dedicated lab space. New Peavy, by comparison, will include more than 7,100 square feet of research lab space.

Finally, lab space in New Peavy will be mostly “dry” research labs, and more than 1,250 square feet of mostly “dry” teaching labs. These new labs are state of the art and are being designed as shared functional labs. Efforts have been made to shift “wet” lab needs to Richardson Hall to efficiently use chemical fume hoods already installed there.  The result is that most of the “wet” labs in current Peavy are being transitioned to Richardson Hall, and more “dry” lab functions will be designed into the New Peavy. We hope one benefit of this approach will be more interaction and potential for collaboration among faculty across departments in the College, especially in soils, fire, silviculture, and ecology.

Does new Peavy account for plans to grow the college by having more space for faculty, staff, and graduate student offices? And if so, is that because the offices are going to be smaller in new Peavy than existing Peavy?

Yes, the design accounts for growth. The number of offices included in the plans for New Peavy is based on a process that engaged each department and every work unit in the College, whether housed in Peavy or Richardson. The process accounted for existing office space needs, unmet current needs, and reasonably anticipated additions to staff and faculty positions.  Those needs were identified by the different departments and work units, with lead managers and department heads signing off on final tallies. Space designated for graduate students was expanded by approximately 18% and configured to allow easy transition to faculty offices at a future time should the need arise.  Accommodating this anticipated growth within in a similar gross square footage was possible because the new building efficiently utilizes space for program needs in ways existing Peavy could not (even with renovation) because of its configuration and the percentage of space below grade (approximately 43%).

Space allocated to staff and faculty is based on the College space policy and the standard designated by the University for different job functions.  Each faculty office in New Peavy will be approximately 120 square feet, as compared to an average of approximately 112 square feet in existing Peavy.  Because the variation in office sizes in existing Peavy will be standardized in New Peavy, some staff and faculty in private offices may see a reduction in workspace, some may be assigned a shared office, and a few may be assigned cubicles based on consistent application of the College space policy across New Peavy and Richardson Halls.  All office spaces in New Peavy will be newly furnished to help maximize workspace and efficiency.

Why do we say New Peavy will be a “green” building?  The carbon footprint of demolition and new construction is greater than remodeling.

The simple answer to this question is that New Peavy will be a “green” building and a project that embodies the tenants of “sustainability” even if the carbon footprint of the project turns out to be greater because it is new construction rather than a renovation of the existing structure.  Both the question and the answer, however, need to take much more into account than the single story of carbon.

No building (renovated or new) can have a zero environmental impact no matter our ambition.  Instead, the design and construction of buildings is an exercise in balancing a set of relevant values, while setting the bar as high as possible for choosing the most responsible path for meeting a given project’s program needs and budget capabilities.

The decision to replace Peavy was a challenging one and was reached after more than a year of investigation into all of the issues associated with renovation vs building new. Throughout the process, the University, College leadership, College, focus groups, and the Design and Construction team sought to capture and balance environmental, educational, social, cultural, and economic factors to reach decisions that will offer the College of Forestry a long-term solution for a next generation academic teaching, research, and learning environment.  In all, approximately 70 meetings have been conducted since 2014 by the design team with College faculty, staff, and students to ensure our building project will meet the identified needs.

While the carbon footprint story of new construction is often (but not always) greater than that associated with renovating existing structures, our framework for balancing different factors reached far beyond the calculation of carbon footprint. Design decisions highly valued the equality created by having a building with greater accessibility to all users, and one that will provide long-term program and teaching flexibility. High value was also placed on creating a built environment that will foster social and cultural connections, provide daylight and natural ventilation to all work spaces (43% of existing Peavy is below grade), and ensure the health and well-being of employees and students. Planning decisions have also prioritized minimizing and managing economic risk to the college from both project completion uncertainties and long-term occupancy costs.   All these priorities were balanced with environmental considerations to collectively determine the best path for the project.

In the context of this balance, the environmental performance of New Peavy as a “green” building will be measured using third party certification standards (the building will meet or exceed LEED Silver standards), as well as performance-based evaluation tools that look at carbon, energy and water use efficiency, and material toxicity.  The College has also committed to completing a Life Cycle Assessment with documented Environmental Building Declarations for the project that will consider: the impact of removing and recycling existing Peavy; the impact of new materials and construction; the impact of energy during construction and the duration of the life of the building; and finally, the impact of final deconstruction at the end of the new building’s life.  On this final part of the project, our plan is to pair the design team and project contractor with College faculty to frame and guide this assessment with transparency and integrity. There is also room for implementing mitigation strategies that arise as this assessment unfolds.

What plan is in place to ensure ongoing maintenance and upkeep of the new building over time?

The University requires all new building projects to have an established and dedicated “Stewardship” fund.  The College, through our Board of Visitors, has established this fund for New Peavy Hall.  It will address ongoing and long-term maintenance of the structure.  Approximately $135,000 will be placed in the fund annually.

What is the timeline for the abatement and deconstruction of Peavy Hall?

The abatement and deconstruction of Peavy Hall will run from July 2016 to mid-October 2016. Click the links below for the full schedule, protective fence outlines, and additional notes. A detailed schedule for August 1-15 can be found here.

Will the women’s restroom and the mechanical room in the basement of Richardson Hall be impacted and for how long?

Currently, we do not expect either room to be impacted by the construction project.

When will the partition walls separating Richardson from the knuckle areas go up?

Currently, we expect the walls to be up during the last two weeks of August. (Subject to change depending on the construction schedule).

When will the knuckle demolition occur?

We do not have this part of the schedule fine-tuned yet. We understand this is a concern for many and we will update this question as soon as we can.