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Parenting@OSU

stories of parenting at the University

Affording the High Cost of Child Care

November 17th, 2011

by a Classified staff mom of a college student son and a 4th grade daughter

Has anyone seen today’s article in the GT?  Childcare rates have increased with the state regulations and yet the wages have not.  How are we to choose between our child’s welfare and making a living?  When will society start putting our families wellbeing ahead of making a living wage?  In some ways Oregon has, but at what cost?  We protect our children, provide good teachers, teach them virtues and yet we struggle to provide for our family.  Why as a single working parent, do I have to choose between feeding my family and paying the electric bill or providing quality child care?  It should not have to be this way in our country, in our state or in our neighborhoods.  I appreciate my child care provider and was thankful for each person who provided the quality care to my children, however they were not in state organized facilities due to the cost.  I mean how I am to afford spending over half my wage on these state regulated organizations?  I might as well not work and stayed home, which I feel a lot of families are choosing today.  One can only afford to pay for some of the state regulated child care centers if you were in a highly professional position or had two incomes.  I hope the future of our families are not jeopardized by the choices our state and federal governments think they are making on our families behalf.  I would like to see them make the choices we have had to make in regards to our children; nutrition/warmth or quality childcare.  What do you think they will choose?

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  • What is this?

    Here in the basement of Kerr, in the office of Childcare & Family Resources, we hear stories. Weird, heartwarming, horrific, sad, and stories so funny they draw in a crowd. We think you need to hear these stories. You need to know of the single undergraduate student with two kids. You need to hear about the tenure track dad expecting his first baby, the classified staff couple that can’t afford childcare on two incomes, the professional faculty whose partner was just laid off. How she just potty trained Jr. while working full time. How he negotiated more leave. How the professor extended her deadline. How she manages to pump and still type emails. How he brought his baby to class.

    So we invite you, parents of OSU, to come here and share your stories: the good, the bad, and the crazy. What you do is amazing, and the whole campus needs to know about it.