In September 2017, the School of Civil and Construction Engineering recognized three faculty members for their contributions to students and the greater school.

Meghna Babbar-Sebens, associate professor of water resources engineering received the CCE Award for Excellence in Partnering, Andre Barbosa, assistant professor of structural engineering, the CCE Award for Research Excellence, and Kenny Martin, senior instructor, the CCE Award for Teaching Excellence.

Babbar-Sebens leads a $1.5 million project funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture. The grant is part of the new NSF-USDA INFEWS program focused on accelerating discovery and innovation at the nexus of food, energy, and water systems. The project is a collaboration between Oregon State and Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis IUPUI and at OSU, Babbar-Sebens collaborates with Ganti Murthy, associate professor in biological and ecological engineering, Jenna Tilt, assistant professor in geography, and Jeff Reimer, associate professor of applied economics. At IUPUI, Babbar-Sebens is working with Snehasis Mukhopadhyay and Arjan Durresi, both professors of computer and information science.

In summer 2017, Barbosa along with Oregon State colleagues and researchers from partner universities put an innovative two-story structure made of cross-laminated timber (known as CLT) panels through a series of seismic tests to determine how it would perform in an earthquake. The tests were conducted at the Natural Hazards Engineering Research Infrastructure at University of California San Diego (NEHRI@UCSD) site, which is funded by the National Science Foundation. Through the tests, they produced data that can be used in the design of a new generation of wood-frame high-rises, such as a four-story parking structure designed for Springfield, Oregon, and the 12-story Framework building in Portland. Scheduled to open in 2018, the 90,000-square-foot Framework structure will be the tallest mass-timber building in the United States.

Martin teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in engineering mechanics and structural engineering. In addition to teaching courses in statics, wood design, and temporary structures, Martin serves as a mentor and advisor to a number of graduate students, who appreciate his efforts greatly. “I really like Kenny Martin,” said student Alyssa Martin. “I had him for statics and he was one of the ones that really worked with me, just to kind of make sure I understood the whole concept of statics – and that you carry with you.”

These three faculty members are working to establish OSU as the partner of choice, lead research that will change the world, and provide a transformational experience for students – and ultimately create a better future.

Congratulations! The Oregon State University student team of Nathan Jones and Alessandra Hossley took first place, earning the Mohr-Circle Award in the 2017 GeoPrediction competition at the annual meeting of the ASCE Geo-Institute. Oregon State has won first place three out of the past four years in the competition, taking home the first place trophy in 2014, 2016, and 2017.

The objective of the GeoPrediction competition is for student teams to develop an accurate prediction of geotechnical behavior given detailed information regarding subsurface, boundary, and initial conditions, as well as the geotechnical, structural, and hydraulic loading. After developing their prediction, student teams present their methodology and findings to a panel of judges comprised of geotechnical practitioners and faculty.

2017 GeoPrediction Competition
The student team of Nathan Jones and Alessandra Hossley took first place, earning the Mohr-Circle Award in the 2017 GeoPrediction competition at the annual meeting of the ASCE Geo-Institute.

“The 2017 GeoPrediction challenged student teams, consisting of one graduate and one undergraduate student, to predict the time-settlement performance and lateral deformation of a highway embankment constructed over soft, compressible clays, using surcharge pre-loading and prefabricated vertical drains,” said Jones, a master’s student in geotechnical engineering. “Estimates of embankment settlement were made at 10, 20, and 30 days after construction began, while lateral displacements of the embankment toe were made to 50-feet below the existing ground surface.”

Advised by Armin Stuedlein, associate professor in geotechnical engineering, Jones and fellow team member Hossley, who is pursuing a dual bachelor’s degree in civil engineering and forest engineering, began working on their prediction in September 2016 and submitted their detailed report in January. OSU was one of eight teams selected to attend the conference and compete for the Mohr-Circle Award.

“This was my first time participating in the GeoPrediction competition and I enjoyed the experience of synthesizing a variety of data for the prediction as well as the overall experience of presenting at a professional conference,” said Hossley.

University of Texas at Arlington placed second and the Middle Eastern Technical University of Ankara, Turkey placed third.

View the student team research poster.

Congratulations to transportation engineering graduate students Jason Anderson and Masoud Ghodrat Abadi. The Pacific Northwest Transportation Consortium (Pactrans) formally recognized Anderson as an Outstanding Student of the Year and Abadi as the winner of the Michael Kyte Award at the Transportation Research Board 96th Annual Meeting.

Anderson is a graduate research assistant in the School of Civil and Construction Engineering. Previously, he completed his bachelor of science and master of science at Oregon State and is now in the first year of his doctoral studies. Anderson’s current research interests include transportation safety through use of behavior modeling and network design and resiliency using operations research methods.

“Jason’s determination and skill have contributed to the success of many of the projects that he has worked on,” said David Hurwitz, associate professor of transportation engineering. “For example, in a recent study, he implemented statistical techniques to determine where large-truck crashes were likely to occur in their relation to existing parking facilities on U.S. 97.”

Ghodrat Abadi is a third year transportation engineering Ph.D. student and currently serves as a graduate research assistant in the Driving and Bicycling Research Laboratory.

“Masoud embodies all of the characteristics expected in a recipient of this prestigious award,” said Hurwitz. “The Michael Kyte award places a particular emphasis on contributions to transportation engineering education, and he has repeatedly demonstrated exemplary performance leading individual lectures in civil engineering classes.”

Since joining Hurwitz’s research group, Ghodrat Abadi has served as the lead graduate student on three significant research projects including an NSF-funded study to develop conceptual traffic signal questions founded in qualitative engineering education research methods, an ODOT-funded study to design an improved red light extension system for isolated signalized intersections, and a PacTrans-funded study to evaluate conflicts between trucks and bikes in loading zones in urban environments.

Ghodrat Abadi is a current member of the TRB Committee on Transportation Education and Training, vice president of the OSU ITE Student Chapter, and served as a co-chair for the 2015 Region X Student conference.

PacTrans, of which Oregon State is a member, is a consortium of transportation professionals and educators from Alaska, Washington, Oregon, and Idaho and is the Regional University Transportation Center (UTC) for Federal Region 10. Through the UTC program, the USDOT awards grants to universities across the U.S. to advance state-of-the-art transportation research and develop the next generation of transportation professionals – of which Anderson and Ghodrat Abadi are well on their way to becoming.

Merrick HallerMerrick Haller, professor of coastal and ocean engineering and associate head of graduate affairs, has been awarded a 5-year, $1.4 million research grant from the Office of Naval Research to investigate hazardous tidal currents in coastal inlets. Under the grant, “MINERS: Multiple Inlet & Estuary Remote Sensing,” Haller and David Honegger, postdoctoral scholar in the Nearshore Remote Sensing Group, will collect radar observations at seven inlets and estuaries across the U.S. for the purpose of better understanding the dynamic current fronts that develop on the ebbing and flooding tides and how they impact the U.S. Navy’s undersea acoustics operations.

“This is an exciting project for us for several reasons,” said Haller. “Navigational inlets are dynamic places that are often dangerous for fishing boats and cargo ships, so our observations will contribute to improved maritime safety. The U.S. Navy is also interested in these data because they show how fresh water coming out of the estuaries interacts with the salty ocean water forming internal tidal bores. These highly turbulent features are hazards to underwater vehicles and disrupt underwater acoustic communication systems.”

Haller joined Oregon State in 2001. He teaches hydraulics, coastal engineering, and ocean wave mechanics. His research program centers around the remote sensing of waves and currents in the nearshore ocean in order to better understand and forecast coastal hazards such as rip currents and breaking waves. Other efforts relate to the interaction between waves and wave energy converters and quantifying the downstream effects of wave energy arrays.

2016 ITE Transportation Education Council Innovation in Education Award At the August 2016 Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE) international annual meeting in Anaheim, Calif., four members of the ITE University Transportation Curriculum Project (UTCP) including David Hurwitz, associate professor in transportation engineering, received the Transportation Education Council Innovation in Education award. Hurwitz, along with project members Kristen Sanford Bernhardt, Rod Turochy, and Rhonda Young received the national honor in recognition of their innovative work over the last seven years on challenges related to undergraduate transportation engineering education.

The group tackled their project by identifying barriers to the adoption of improved and innovative teaching methods, developing course materials, and building of a community of practice for transportation educators throughout the country. The group received their award not only for their innovative methods but also for their perseverance in absence of a funding stream.

“It has been a personally and professionally rewarding experience working with my colleagues, Drs. Young, Turochy, and Sanford Bernhardt, to produce an educational impact worthy of national recognition,” said Hurwitz.

University-based transportation engineering education plays an important role in the recruitment and development of transportation professionals. Through their efforts, the UTCP is working to attract and retain undergraduate transportation engineering students and better prepare them for practice or graduate school.

Big Beam 2016Oregon State University earned third place among competitors throughout North America at the Precast/Prestressed Concrete Institute (PCI) Big Beam Contest. The contest objective is for student teams to fabricate and test a precast/prestressed concrete beam with the help of local PCI members. The beam must be made primarily of concrete without any trusses, arches, or other non-flexural members. Prizes are awarded to the top 20 performers in consideration of efficient design, highest load capacity, and other categories.

The Oregon State team from the College of Engineering’s School of Civil and Construction Engineering was comprised of Tyler Oathes, Cody Tibbits, Neil Schweitzer, Taylor Kiefel, Anh Nguyen, and Jonathan Kopp with faculty advisor Keith Kaufman, and PCI producer Knife River – Prestress of Harrisburg, Ore.

Congratulations to the students on an outstanding performance and thank you to PCI producer Knife River for your continued support of student learning at Oregon State.

 

Shane Brown

As an engineering professional who spent five years in private practice prior to earning his Ph.D., Associate Professor Shane Brown knows first-hand about the skills, concepts, and qualities needed to thrive as a practicing engineer. In his research, Brown aims to identify new ways to help students understand the fundamental concepts they will need to succeed in the engineering workplace.

Brown, who earned his Ph.D. in Civil Engineering from Oregon State, joined CCE in 2014 after teaching at Washington State University and managing projects at private firms. His research examines why particular engineering concepts are harder to learn than others and how educational institutions can develop environments that facilitate understanding, particularly within solid and fluid mechanics and transportation. He also explores differences in ways of knowing and how core concepts are used in engineering practice.

Currently, Brown is working with 20 researchers and engineering instructors from different colleges and universities to discover new teaching approaches for the course Mechanics of Materials. Specifically, the project will help students acquire a deeper understanding of fundamental engineering concepts such as stress, strain, and equilibrium – concepts that play a vital role in the safety of the built environment. “Theoretical contributions related to learning fundamental engineering concepts and the link between education and practice are vital to preparing students for an innovative and creative workforce,” said Brown.

In another effort to enhance instruction, Brown serves as co-principal investigator for ESTEME@OSU, a project supported by the Nation Science Foundation which is working to broadly implement innovative evidence-based instructional practices – specifically, interactive engagement in lecture and formal cooperative learning – into core biology, chemistry, engineering, mathematics, and physics undergraduate courses. Last year, Brown also led the development of a new Engineering Education research program in CCE. Engineering Education offers master of science, master of engineering, and doctoral degrees and focuses on understanding and improving student learning in engineering and better aligning engineering education with engineering practice.

In recognition of these many contributions to student learning, Brown received the OSU Faculty Teaching Excellence Award in September 2015. Among the reasons he was selected for the honor include his exceptional effort to ensure the quality of the students’ classroom experience and his direct and significant impact upon and involvement with students.

In addition to obtaining a thorough understanding of the fundamental concepts of their field, Brown said, “I recommend that students meet professionals. Ask them what they do to be successful. Be an advocate for yourself.”

Geo_Video_0316 (1 of 1)Geo_0216 (2 of 2) copy

CCE student teams won first place in two competitions at the Geotechnical and Structural Engineering Congress held February 14-17, 2016 in Phoenix, Ariz.

Mentored by faculty member Ben Mason, the GeoVideo student team of Youssef Bougataya, David Bailey, Rachel Adams, and Sharoo Shrestha placed first for their video, “Soil Structure Interaction During Earthquakes.” The GeoVideo competition received 10 entries with six invited to present at the congress.

“During earthquake shaking, buildings interact with the soil they sit atop, and the soil interacts with the buildings it supports, which is a phenomenon called seismic soil-structure interaction. During many seismic design scenarios, the potential effects of seismic soil-structure interaction, regardless of whether the effects are beneficial, neutral, or detrimental, are ignored,” said Mason. “The students did an excellent job communicating why seismic soil-structure interaction effects are important using a table top demonstration. I look forward to showing their video during my classes.”

In the GeoPrediction competition, the CCE team of Bougataya and Nathan Jones won first place out of nine presenting teams and 18 international submissions. For the competition, teams were required to predict the deflection profile of a 90-foot-deep, tied-back excavation in downtown Seattle, constructed in 2004. In scoring, the prediction and documentation in the report was worth 75 percent and the presentation of the work was worth 25 percent. The team was advised by CCE faculty member Armin W. Stuedlein and three geotechnical practitioners and professors scored the presentations. Each team had 5 to 10 minutes to present their work and answered technical questions for 5 minutes following presentations. Arizona State University took second place and Middle East Technical University of Ankara, Turkey placed third.

“The students faced tough competition, but worked diligently to study the difficult geology of Seattle and how the history of glaciation impacted the strength and stiffness of the soil being excavated,” said Stuedlein. “According to the lead designer of the deep excavation, OSU’s team produced a better lateral displacement profile than their own models, calibrated with 40 years of experience in that geology!”

The congress was unique this year in that the Geo-Institute (G-I) and Structural Engineering Institute (SEI) of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) came together to create the first-of-its-kind congress by combining both institutes’ annual conferences into one event.

Congratulations to the teams on an excellent job well done!

Andy Truong
Andy Truong

In December, CCE student Andy Truong was named a recipient of the 2015 American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Student Leadership Award. Out of the 328 ASCE student chapters, 12 Student Leadership Awards were awarded – 10 domestic and two international – based on the strength of the nomination form, without regard to region.

The ASCE Student Leadership Award is granted to an ASCE student member who has demonstrated leadership in a chapter through various activities such as serving as an officer, leading special events, and interacting with university administration. During the past three years, Andy has served the chapter in three key officer positions and as co-captain and captain of the ASCE concrete canoe team. In the role of captain, Andy not only introduced an innovative construction technique but also initiated new methods of team communication and organization.

Congratulations to Andy on this outstanding achievement!

As part of its Homecoming festivities, the Oregon State University Alumni Association will recognize CCE alumnus Tom Skoro as an alumni fellow on October 23. Skoro was one of six alumni to receive the distinguished honor.

After graduating from Oregon State in 1981 with a bachelor’s in construction engineering management, Skoro worked continuously in the heavy construction industry, primarily with Kiewit Construction Group. Inc. He has varied construction experience but has specialized in bridge construction, including high-tech segmental construction. Skoro resides in Vancouver, Wash., and is a senior vice president of Kiewit Corporation.

The OSUAA established the alumni fellows program in 1988 to help OSU colleges recognize their eminent alumni. Honorees have distinguished themselves in their professions and communities.

Congratulations to CCE faculty members Shane Brown and Jonathan (Jack) Istok on receiving awards at the 2015 University Day Faculty and Staff Awards Recognition event. Professor Shane Brown received the OSU Faculty Teaching Excellence Award, which honors unusually significant and meritorious achievement in teaching and scholarship which enhances effective instruction. Professor Jonathan Istok received the Richard… Continue reading

On Thursday, August 13 from 11:45 a.m. to 1:45 p.m. PST, Andre Barbosa and other members of the NSF-RAPID project team will discuss recent observations in the 2015 Nepal (Gorkha) Debriefing, hosted by the Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research Center (PEER).

Join the debriefing online at: bit.ly/1MoxIJv 

Learn more about the NSF-RAPID Grant for Post-Disaster Data Collection.

The Precast/Prestressed Concrete Institute (PCI) announced that Oregon State University earned second place amongst competitors from throughout the nation in the annual Big Beam Contest. The OSU CCE student team was comprised of Karryn Johnsohn, Jason Anderson, and Curtis Blank and was advised by Keith Kaufman of the Knife River Corporation.

The objective of the Big Beam contest is for student teams to fabricate and test a precast/prestressed concrete beam with the help of local PCI members. The beam must be made primarily of concrete without any trusses, arches, or other non-flexural members – and prizes are awarded in consideration of efficient design, highest load capacity, and other categories.

OSU has a long history of performing well in the competition. Since the contest began in 2001, OSU has captured four national championships. This year, OSU placed second in North America, ahead of 18 other recognized teams.

Congratulations students on your excellent work!

CCE 2015 Big Beam Team
CCE 2015 Big Beam Team

CH2M-Hill, in association with Oregon State University’s (OSU) College of Engineering and School of Civil and Construction Engineering, sponsored and conducted the 46th annual model bridge contest on Saturday. The competition was originally named for one of CH2M-Hill’s founders, Holly Cornell, a 1938 graduate of OSU’s Civil Engineering Department, who provided a grant for the contest. The contest requires high school students to make a basswood bridge to a specification with the intent to carry as much load as possible.

The competition is intended to promote interest in engineering and provides an opportunity for high school teachers to introduce the concepts of design and testing of engineering structures to their students. Also, a considerable amount of skill is required to construct the models, and the students learn the importance of working to a specification.

The contest is “staffed” by professional engineers from CH2M-Hill and students from OSU’s School of Civil and Construction Engineering, many of whom are members of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) stude¬nt chapter. OSU students help with setup, cleanup, registration, weighing, measuring, testing, and distribution of refreshments.

In total, students from five high schools participated in the 2015 contest: ACE Academy, Riverdale, Springfield, Nestucca, and Yoncalla.

CH2M-Hill and OSU hope that the contest inspires some high school students to study engineering at the University. However, the organizers consider their effort worthwhile if everyone enjoys the day at OSU and the interaction with college students, faculty, and practicing engineers. In attendance were approximately 29 high school students, 20 teachers and parents, 21 OSU student volunteers, two ASCE practitioner advisors, and the ASCE, faculty advisor. Our judges again this year were Devin Altman from CH2M-Hill and Dusty Andrews from Knife River.

The 2015 contest involved a number of ASCE student helpers from 7:00 a.m. until 2:30 p.m. 129 bridges were tested. Rules for the International Bridge Contest were used again this year. The most efficient bridge carried more than 5,000 times its weight of 9.4 g! Students from Riverdale placed first, second and third in the Conde McCullough Region and Nestucca placed first, second and third in the Holly Cornell Region.

The students finishing in first and second place in each region are eligible to enter the International Contest to be held later this year.

— Tom Miller, Associate Professor of Civil Engineering

The Oregon State University School of Civil and Construction Engineering placed three teams among the top three in their respective categories at the 28th Annual Associated Schools of Construction Region 6 and 7 Student Competition, held Feb. 4-7 at the J.A. Nugget Casino Resort in Reno, Nev.

OSU captured one team titles at the event, winning the Marine contest, while the Mixed Use and Mechanical teams each finished third.

The marine victory was the fifth for OSU and the third in the last four years. Marine team members for the competition included OSU students Chris Duty, Erik Green, Jordan Hamilton, Rian Leitgeb, Jakob Neuenschwander, and Michael Wilson.

OSU students Nathan Hufendick, Timothy Johnston, Chelsea Laird, Robert Maxey, Arron Min, and Cody Schmelz formed the mechanical team as OSU captured a top-three finish for the fourth consecutive year.

Finally, Tyler Binns, Tyler Hurlbutt, Vincent Matteson, Jeff Nakashima, Devon Renard, and Andrew Riley led the school to a third-place finish in the mixed use competition.

OSU also fielded teams in commercial building, heavy civil, multi-use structures, risk, and pre-constriction, rounding out an impressive showing by the school at the annual event.

The school’s participation at this year’s event was made possible through faculty and staff support in addition to the generous contributions from a number of industry partners. Industry sponsors for the competition included: Kiewit, Kerr Contractors, PMCA Oregon, AGC Oregon-Columbia Chapter, Andersen Construction, JE Dunn Construction, Traylor Brothers, Walsh Construction, Fortis Construction, Whitaker/Ellis, Walsh Group, and Todd Hess Building Company.

The annual student competition, which features thousands of students from institutions in 13 states, is held by the ASC, the professional association for the development and advancement of construction education, where the sharing of ideas and knowledge inspires, guides and promotes excellence in curricula, teaching, research and service. This year’s competition featured over 1000 students competing for 44 institutions.

Congratulations to OSU PhD transportation student Masoud Ghodrat Abadi on being selected as the recipient of the 2014-15 Bill Kloos Scholarship. Masoud was selected for the award after his submission of the Busy Beaver board game (a transportation related board game) displayed a creative and unique way to share the transportation engineering field with others.

The scholarship is offered by the Oregon Section of ITE and the Bill Kloos Scholarship Fund to provide financial assistance to students pursuing degrees in transportation engineering or other related fields. It is named after William C. Kloos, who was the Signals and Street Light Manager at the City of Portland for 25 years. Bill was a talented leader, innovative problem solver and mentor to many throughout his career. One of Bill’s unique talents was public speaking and presenting technical information to a wide range of audiences. This scholarship was developed in order to promote the innovative thinking and communication skills of the future transportation professionals.

Candidates are evaluated based on a scholarship “Application” in the form of an essay, presentation/poster, Powerpoint presentation, or video that focuses on transportation/traffic engineering.

Masoud’s selection marks the third time in four years an OSU transportation student was selected for the honor. OSU grad student Jennifer Warner received the scholarship last year.

OSU CCE professor David Trejo gave an invited lecture for The Minerals, Metals, and Materials Society at the 2015 Middle East – Mediterranean Materials Congress, held in Doha, Qatar. Professor Trejo’s presentation was entitled “Quantifying Material, Environmental, and System Variables Influencing the Structural Performance of Reinforced Concrete Structures Affected by Alkali Silica Reactions.”

Visit the conference website for more information about the talk.

Congratulations to Jennifer Warner, second year MS student at OSU, as she was presented with the 2014 Michael Kyte Outstanding Student of the Year award at the PacTrans Reception during the 94th Transportation Research Boards Annual Meeting.

Each year, Federal Region 10 University Transportation Centers give out the Michael Kyte Outstanding Student of the Year Award to honorees based on accomplishments in three areas: technical merit and research, academic performance, and professionalism and leadership. Warner is advised by OSU CCE assistant professor, Dr. David Hurwitz.

OSU CCE alum David Linton (’10), currently a project engineer at Mackenzie, will be accepting the 2015 Raymond C. Reese Research Prize at the Structures Congress in Portland in April for the paper “Evaluation of Tsunami Loads on Wood-Frame Walls at Full Scale,” published in the Journal of Structural Engineering.

The project was conducted at the O. H. Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory as part of NSF’s NEES program. Co-authors include Prof. Rakesh Gupta in (College of Forestry), Prof. Dan Cox (College of Engineering), Prof. John van de Lindt (Colorado State University), Mary Beth Berkes (’10 Ocean Engineering), and Milo Clauson (College of Forestry).

This paper addresses tsunami loads on wood buildings through full-scale experimentation and is a crucial topic in the design of tsunami-prone structures, which has not received adequate attention in the field. The authors placed full-scale walls in a tsunami testing facility to investigate how a flexible structure performed when subjected to a solitary wave bore. The hydrodynamic conditions (water level and bore speed) and structural response (horizontal force, pressure, and deflection) were observed for a range of incident tsunami heights and for several wood wall framing configurations.

For each tsunami wave height tested, the force and pressure profiles showed a transient peak force followed by a period of sustained quasi-static force. The observed ratio of the transient force to quasi-static force was found to be close to 2.2. This value was compared with the measured forces with predictive equations from the literature and observed wood wall performance under such extreme loading. It was found that existing equations predicted the measured forces on the vertical wall within an accuracy of approximately 20%.

The study represents a significant step toward understanding the complex nature of wave structure interaction, particularly the performance of light-frame wood construction, which is commonly used around the world. Given the paucity of full-scale experimental data, the advances made by this paper are considered seminal and will most probably influence the field of tsunami engineering in the future.

The Raymond C. Reese Research Prize is awarded to the author or authors of a paper that describes a notable achievement in research related to structural engineering.

Jennifer Warner captured first-place at the summit with her presentation on "Right Hook Crash Mitigations."
Jennifer Warner captured first-place at the summit with her presentation on “Right Hook Crash Mitigations.”

This past week, 12 students from the Oregon State University School of Civil and Construction Engineering attended the annual Oregon Transportation Summit in Portland, hosted by the Oregon Transportation Research and Education Consortium and Portland State University.  The summit brought together Oregon’s academic and transportation professionals to advance the state of the field by accelerating new research into practice and by shaping the agenda for future research. OSU’s trip was highlighted by graduate student Jennifer Warner’s first-place finish in the Three-Minute Thesis Competition, for her presentation on “Right Hook Crash Mitigations.”

“The summit was a huge success,” OSU graduate student Rachel Vogt said. “We were able to expand our knowledge of transportation while networking with professionals and academics from across Oregon.”

The summit featured a plenary session with Sue Groth from MinnDOT, Troy Costales from Oregon Transportation Safety Division, and Leah Treat from City of Portland, all of whom discussed “Envisioning Vision Zero” or reducing the amount of traffic related incidents to zero fatalities.  Their thought-provoking topics focused on the recent safety initiatives at the national, state, and local levels.  Additionally, the students had the opportunity to listen to the keynote speaker, Jarrett Walker of Jarrett Walker & Associates, give a talk on the benefits of considering the rational choices surrounding public transit, and how doing so can enrich our communities and our lives.

Five of the OSU students in attendance, (Sarah McCrea, Rachel Vogt, Jennifer Warner, Julia Kautz, and Medha Jannat) presented their ongoing research projects during the student poster session. Through this session, they were able to discuss their work with the leading professionals and researchers from Oregon.

Three students, (Dylan Anderson, Jasmine Pahukula, and Jennifer Warner), participated in the Three-Minute Thesis Competition, where students had three minutes and one slide to present their research work to a panel of judges and captivate the interest of the audience.

OSU_CCE_Bridge_team_1314_webCongrats to a team of Oregon State University School of Civil and Construction Engineering students as they captured the national title in the 2014 Precast/Prestressed Concrete Institute (PCI) Big Beam Contest! The squad, consisting of students Luke Cressman, Drew Nielson, Sandy Spencer, Jarrett Yanagida, and advised by Keith Kaufmann of the Knife River Corporation, took home a $2000 prize with the victory. In addition, the team will attend the 2014 PCI Fall Convention, held in National Harbor, Md., from Sept. 6-9.

OSU, which won the national title for the fourth time, also took home top spot in the region, placing ahead of Sacramento State, Northern Arizona, UC San Diego, and Washington.

The year-long contest consisted of  fabricating and testing a precast/prestressed concrete beam with the help of a local advisor. Prizes were awarded to the top performers in each zone in consideration of efficient design, highest load capacity, and other categories. For more information about the contest, visit the official rules.

Oregon State University School of Civil and Construction Engineering graduate students Dylan Anderson and Rachel Vogt have been awarded 2014 Dwight David Eisenhower Transportation Fellowships. The highly competitive national awards are given as part of the Dwight David Eisenhower Transportation Fellowship Program (DDETFP), which was started in 1991 to attract qualified students to the fields of transportation education and research, and advance transportation workforce development.

Advised by OSU associate professor Katharine Hunter-Zaworski, Anderson is developing a manual to improve safety at rail public transportation platforms. The research, conducted under the Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP), will assist transit agencies to prevent and minimize public rail transit safety incidents.

Vogt, who is advised by OSU assistant professor Haizhong Wang, is working with the Oregon Department of Transportation to understand and address questions related to decreasing fuel tax  combined with increasing infrastructure costs. As Oregon continues to explore a Road User Charge (RUC), her research will focus on how various rate structures and implementation strategies may impact different socio-economic groups and regions of the state.

Approximately 150 to 200 Eisenhower Transportation Fellowships are awarded each year based on funding availability. Since its inception, the program has awarded over 2,000 Eisenhower Transportation Fellowships.

For more information about the program, visit the DDETFP website.

Annika O’Dea, a coastal and ocean engineering graduate student in the Oregon State University School of Civil and Construction Engineering, has been awarded the prestigious Fulbright scholarship, the Council for International Exchange of Scholars announced earlier this month. O’Dea, who will graduate from OSU with a master’s degree in civil engineering, will use the award to travel to Senegal and research coastal evolution and coastal hazards in the region.

“It is a great opportunity and I was really excited when I found out I had been named to the program,” O’Dea said. “West Africa faces a lot of erosion issues and has been impacted by rising sea-levels. The coast is heavily populated and is constantly changing. They are losing roads and buildings and the area will only get worse as sea-levels continue to rise.”

O’Dea’s research, which starts in October and is funded for one year, will look at how the coast has changed in recent years and predict how future changes in sea-levels could impact the area.

She learned she received the prominent award in late April as it was the culmination of a lengthy application process. Working with the OSU Fulbright Scholar Program and advisors Laurence Becker (associate professor, Geosciences) and Nick Fleury (head advisor, International Degrees), O’Dea submitted her application to OSU for review in September before submitting to the national organization in October.

While at OSU, O’Dea has worked with OSU CCE associate professor Merrick Haller on the nearshore impact of wave energy extraction and will present her thesis in a few weeks.

The Fulbright Program is sponsored by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs and awards approximately 8,000 grants annually. Since its inception in 1946, approximately 310,000 “Fulbrighters” have participated in the program.

The Oregon State University steel bridge team had an outstanding showing at the national competition as the team finished in ninth-place out of 49 teams at the event held on May 23-24, 2014, in Akron, Ohio. The OSU team consisted of Chelsea Farnsworth, Peter Mercer, Jessee Bogenoff, Chris Derbyshire and captains, Barry Maslen and Austin Williams and qualified for the national event by winning the regional competition at Portland State University.

The contest involved design, fabrication/welding, and timed construction of an approximately 20-foot span bridge evaluated on lightness, construction speed, and stiffness in supporting 2500 lbs of load. The OSU team improved its scores in a number of categories over their performance in regionals at PSU.

“I am tremendously proud of this year’s team as they excelled in all aspects of the project,” said OSU associate professor and ASCE student chapter faculty advisor Tom Miller. “Their success was truly a team effort. The support this year from the School of Civil and Construction Engineering, College of Engineering, OSU Student Foundation, OSU Department of Physics, ASCE Oregon Section, ASCE Capital Branch and a number of generous individual donors was wonderful and made the win at regionals, great performance at nationals and preparation for future successes possible.”

The competition, which saw 208 teams compete at the regional level, was sponsored by the American Society of Civil Engineers and the American Institute of Steel Construction.

Arturo Leon, Ph.D., P.E, Assistant Professor in the School of Civil and Construction Engineering at Oregon State University, has been named a Diplomate, Water Resources Engineer (D.WRE) of the American Academy of Water Resources Engineers (AAWRE), a subsidiary of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE).

The D.WRE certification is the highest post-license certification available in the water resources engineering profession and it is an accredited program by the Council of  Engineering & Scientific Specialty Boards (CESB).  The D.WRE represents strong professional ethics, a commitment to life-long learning and continuing professional development. Arturo will be inducted as Diplomate on June 2, 2014 at the 2014 ASCE-EWRI World Water & Environmental Resources Congress.

DSCN1781Last week, the OSU ASCE steel bridge team captured the team title at the  2014 ASCE Pacific Northwest Student Conference. With the victory in the steel bridge competition, OSU will advance to the ASCE national competition, held from May 23-23 in Akron, Ohio. The performance marked the first time in over 10 years the group has advanced to nationals. With a goal of raising $5500 for the trip to nationals, supporters can contribute to the trip by visiting the group’s fundraising website.

The victory in the steel bridge competition capped a solid weekend for OSU ASCE as the group placed second in the environmental competition and concrete bowling ball competition while the concrete canoe team placed third.

Portland State University hosted the 2014 student conference from April 25-27 as it featured over 350 students from universities in Alaska, Idaho, Washington, Oregon, and Montana.

A complete rundown of OSU results is below.

2014 ASCE Pacific Northwest Student Conference – OSU Results

Steel Bridge:
1st – Aesthetics
1st – Construction Speed
3rd – Lightness
1st – Overall
Concrete Canoe:
1st – Women’s Endurance
3rd- Men’s Endurance
2nd – Women’s Sprint
6th – Men’s Sprint
1st – Coed Sprint
3rd – Overall
Environmental Competition:
2nd – Overall
Concrete Bowling Ball Competition:
2nd – Overall
An additional congratulations for excellent work to:
Kristina Milaj in the Technical Paper and Presentation Competition.
The four ASCE members who participated in the Surveying Competition.

Congratulations to the Oregon State University American Society of Civil Engineers Student Chapter for winning four awards handed out by the organization! The chapter was honored with the following:

2014 ASCE Distinguished Chapter Award for Region 8  (top chapter in OR, WA, AK, HI, ID, MT, NV, UT, AZ)

2014 Richard J. Scranton Outstanding Community Service Award  – Top chapter in the nation. The ASCE Student Leadership Award is granted to an ASCE Student Member who has demonstrated leadership in a Student Chapter/International Student Group through various activities (e.g., service as an officer, leading special events, interaction with university administration, and interaction with ASCE Sections/Branches). OSU ASCE was recognized for their work in Nicaragua.

2014 Outstanding Practitioner Advisor Award for Region 8  – Ken Archibald

2014 Outstanding Faculty Advisor Award for Region 8  – Tom Miller

 

Oregon State University School of Civil and Construction Engineering professor Chris Higgins, Ph.D., P.E., the Slayden Construction Faculty Fellow, was honored with a Special Achievement Award from the American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC) this week.

AISC’s Special Achievement Award recognizes individuals who have demonstrated notable achievements in structural steel design, construction, research or education. It honors those who have made a positive and substantial impact on the structural steel design and construction industry.

Higgins was honored for his work on developing software imaging tools for use in the inspection of steel bridge gusset plates.

Corporate and Commercial Photographer for Worldwide Assignments

Oregon State University Civil and Construction Engineering students Andrew Strahler (PhD) and Trevor Bineham (undergrad) won first-place in the Geo-prediction contest at the annual ASCE Geo-Congress in Atlanta, Ga.

The student competition was sponsored by the Geo-Institute to challenge and encourage undergraduate and graduate civil engineering students interested in geotechnical engineering.

As part of the contest, Strahler and Bineham were tasked with predicting the behavior of a real world geotechnical system.

A trio of Oregon State University School of Civil and Construction Engineering alums were honored at the annual Oregon Stater Awards, held on Friday Feb. 21.

Joshan W. Rohani, a project manager at David Evans and Associates, was named to the Council of Outstanding Early Career Engineers. Meanwhile, Lee R. Zink, area manager for Kiewit Infrastructure West, was named to the Academy of Distinguished Engineers and James R. Plasker, retired executive director of the American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing, was named to the Engineering Hall of Fame.

Congratulations to all of the award-winners!

Risk_web

The Oregon State University School of Civil and Construction Engineering placed three teams among the top three in their respective categories at the 27th Annual Associated Schools of Construction Region 6 and 7 Student Competition, held Feb. 5-8 at the J.A. Nugget Casino Resort in Reno, Nev.

OSU captured two team titles at the event, winning the Marine and Mechanical contests while the Determining Project Risk squad finished in second-place.

The marine victory was the fourth for OSU and the second in the last three years. Marine team members for the competition included OSU students Nicholas Briesach, Jeffrey Brink, Chris Duty, Daniel Freitas, Evan Gross and Damien Pulley.

OSU students Lucas Brown, Robbie Mize, Jason Powell, Blain Rennels, Elijah Thibodeau and Chad Walker formed the mechanical team as OSU captured its third straight (fourth overall) win in the category.

Meanwhile, OSU juniors Thomas Bancroft, Sarah Cochenour, Erik Green, Sarah Leads, Jeff Nakashima, Barret Neumayr and Patrick Van Epps led the school to a second-place finish in the ‘Determining Project Risk” competition.

OSU also fielded teams in commercial building, heavy civil and multi-use structures, rounding out an impressive showing by the school at the annual event.

The school’s participation at this year’s event was made possible through faculty and staff support in addition to the generous contributions from a number of industry partners.

The annual student competition, which features thousands of students from institutions in 13 states, is held by the ASC, the professional association for the development and advancement of construction education, where the sharing of ideas and knowledge inspires, guides and promotes excellence in curricula, teaching, research and service.