Hannah Whitley

Hannah Whitley

The end of spring term is near, and summer is right around the corner! For those Oregon State students living on-campus, it is time to start thinking about moving out of your residence hall. Having lived in a residence hall for the past two years, I am quite familiar with the potential stress brought on during the move out process, but have no fear! Here are a few tips I have found helpful for transitioning out of on-campus living:

1. Use all of your UHDS Dining Dollars!
a. Any unused UHDS Dining Dollars by the end of June 12 will be forfeited. Have no fear- Orange Rewards funds do not expire and are with you throughout your time as a student at OSU. Log into your MyUHDS account (http://uhds.link/myuhds) to see your current Dining Dollar and Orange Rewards balance.
b. Keep in mind- the last day to change your meal plan is June 1.

2. Make sure to inform your RA (Resident Assistant) ahead of time about when you will be moving out of your room.
a. This will most likely occur during your hall’s end of year floor meeting. If you fail to check-out properly, you may be charged a $50.00 Improper Check Out Fee.

3. Start packing early.
a. There is nothing worse than stressing out about your move out time in the middle of finals week. Remember: it’s better to be safe than sorry!

4. If you have to ship or transport your belongings back home through the air, be sure to wean your items down to the necessities.
a. Many residence halls offer blue containers available for students to donate any clothing, furniture, food, or technological items they are willing to part with. Make sure to check with one of your hall RAs for more information.

5. Make sure to take your bike(s) with you!
a. All bikes that are left behind after June 12 will be removed by Public Safety and will be taken to surplus property.

Moving out of the residence halls may seem like a stressful process, but it doesn’t have to be! Start early and don’t be afraid to take your time. If you have any questions about UHDS and the residence hall move out process, feel free to call University Housing and Dining Services at 1-541-737-4771 or email housing@oregonstate.edu with any questions about on-campus living and the move out process.

McKenzie Ross McKenzie Ross

With warm weather taking over it becomes easy to abandon your books for television. Don’t get me wrong, my summer will definitely see some long and hard fought marathons (Orange is the New Black season three anyone?). However, I’ll also be picking up a few books for enjoyment. I find the most daunting part of reading in the summer is figuring out what to read; seriously, where’s a syllabus when you actually want one? So I’ve put together a summer reading list with ambassador recommendations. Spanning different many different subjects there’s bound to be a book or two for you here.


And Then There Were None – Agatha Christie
Breanna raves that “it’s a slyly crafted 1930s murder mystery that takes place on a small (fictional) island along the English coast. It was one of the first mysteries I read and it got me hooked even more so on reading!”


Nickel and Dimed – Barbara Ehrenreich
John says “it’s an auto-biographical account of Ehrenreich going “undercover” to work a year-round, full-time, minimum wage job (as millions of Americans do every year). Ehrenreich gives an eye-opening account of what it’s like to live at the bottom of the economic ladder and forces you to look at the world in a different way.”


Books from a husband and wife duo:
Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close – Jonathan Safran and The History of Love – Nicole Krauss
Hannah says “I’ve read both books each summer since my freshman year in high school. After each read, I think I’ve finally decided what the two books are about, but then I re-read and come up with something different. [Both books are] unconventional, thought provoking, and wonderful.”

Burning Down the House – Nell Bernstein
Logan says “it’s an incredible read about the criminal justice system from behind the bars in juvenile detention facilities. You hear about many individual cases (both positive and negative) that are eye opening and impactful. It truly makes you appreciate life and allows you to see the world from a different lens.”


Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies – Seth Holmes
Holly says this book is “really good for people interested in migrant work, food industries, or public health. A man joins a group of illegal immigrants on their journey crossing the boarder and working as farmers in [Pacific Northwest farms].


The Kite Runner – Khaled Hosseini
Of her favorite book Jenna says “it’s a story of a young boy and his life growing up in the Middle East. It’s all the emotions packed into one book.”

Logan Pedersen by Logan Pedersen

As college students with busy lives we can often forget to take breaks, to simply stop, relax, and reflect. If you are looking for a place to escape for some wonderful relaxation, quiet time, and bliss then look no further than the downtown boardwalk of Corvallis. Right off of 1st street lies a boardwalk that extends down 10 blocks. This is a great place to clear your mind, relax, and enjoy the wonderful nature that Corvallis has to offer. As you walk down the boardwalk on one side you will discover many diverse local restaurants such as Great Harvest Bread Co., Sada Sushi, and Riverview Mongolian Grill, while on the other side you hear the peaceful sound of the Willamette River. The boardwalk is great place to go during lunch or dinnertime to grab a bite to eat and walk alongside the river. Whether you’re looking for a good place to go for a date night, break from school/work, or simply want some quite time, check out this hidden gem that is bound to open your eyes to the beauty within Corvallis just minutes away from campus.

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These are pictures of the boardwalk from an evening stroll I went on this past week.

Holly Briggs by Holly Briggs

We have all been listening to the news, hearing about police brutality and protests that became violent from a sensational and skewed perspective. What we don’t get from the media are well-reasoned and in-depth discussions of recent events in Baltimore and elsewhere. This week at OSU there important forums discussing social justice issues as well as effective ways to take action.

On Tuesday May 12th, four professors from various departments will be at the Black Cultural Center as apart of a panel to help us all make some sense of the issues and place them within the context of the ongoing national story surrounding racial inequality and direct action. Participating will be, professors Crystal Boson (WGSS), Marisa Chappell (HST), Stacey Smith (HST), and Joseph Orosco (PHL). Each will analyze the situation in a different way, discussing Baltimore’s events in the context of violence and silence of Black women, and in the context of racial inequality and the history of direct action. This event is free and begins at 4:00pm.

Another event to consider is the Science Fiction, Social Justice, and the Radical Imagination Lecture in the Special Collections and Archives Research Center in the Valley Library. This event will examine the ways in which fantasy fiction can inspire the radical imagination to envision the features of a socially just world. After the lecture there is a workshop in the MU Journey room that will use science fiction movies, things like Star Wars and Lord of the Rings, to create direct action plans that parallel our world’s need for social justice. This event is also free, the lecture in the library begins at 4:00pm and the workshop begins at 6:00pm in the MU Journey Room.

These forums provide an opportunity for us all to become better informed in order to help continue to effect the change our generation wishes to see in this world.


If you haven’t already come to understand that spring term at Oregon State flies right by, then consider yourself fairly warned! Already, we’re part way through week six with only five short weeks left until not only the end of the term, but also the end of the academic year. This means that when you note that today is Cinco de Mayo, you can be reminded of the celebratory nature of spring term, but you should also recall that this is the time of year to make your academic advising appointments… for fall term!

Fall 2015 might seem like ages from now, but it will sneak up on you, believe me. Take advantage of the chance to plan ahead and feel confident that the classes you’re taking next term will help you start the year off right. For first-year College of Liberal Arts students, remember this is time to meet with your major advisor and start to have even more in-depth conversations about opportunities within your major. Logistically, you’ll need to meet with your major advisor to receive your registration PIN. Feel free to still consult the College of Liberal Arts Central Advising Office, particularly for questions regarding bacc core classes — they are happy to help!

So, if you haven’t already set up an appointment with your major advisor, be sure to do so sometime during this beautiful week six. If you missed the Matriculation Celebration or are unsure of who your major advisor is, check in with the CLA Central Advising Office (by calling (541) 737-0561 or stopping by Gilkey 213).

by Breanna Balleby