The resources here are curated in order to provide a more in-depth knowledge of language assessment and testing.

Online Resources in Testing and Assessment

  • Language Testing Resources Website — a website maintained by Professor Glen Fulcher that provides a wealth or resources related to language testing. Fulcher mentions that it features “resources on language testing, such as articles, features, videos and audio, [which] are made freely available for language teachers, language testers, and students of language testing, applied linguistics, and languages.”
  • International Language Testing Association (ILTA) –ILTA is an international group of language testing and assessment scholars and practitioners whose dedication and work are respected both within and outside the profession, and who together define what it means to be a language tester.
  • Program for International Student Assessment (PISA)–a triennial international survey which aims to evaluate education systems worldwide by testing the skills and knowledge of 15-year-old students.
  • Midwest Association of Language Testers –The purpose of the Midwest Association of Language Testers (MwALT) is to foster understanding of the principles of language assessment in educational settings in the Midwest.
  • Association of Language Testers in Europe –ALTE is an association of language test providers who work together to promote the fair and accurate assessment of linguistic ability across Europe and beyond. They also feature resources on their site that are helpful for designing assessments related to the CEFR.
  • Canadian Association of Language Assessment –CALA is a professional and academic association dealing with language assessment in Canada.

Academic Journals

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If you have ever written a conference proposal and gotten rejected, then you’ve probably been left wondering why your proposal was not selected over others. Writing a successful conference proposal continues to be a daunting task for us as teaching professionals. Whats more, the feedback we receive on rejected proposals is often written in cryptic commentaries that provide little to no direction on how to better successfully meet future proposal expectations.¬†We know that the work that we do both in and out of the classroom is valuable and can help make a difference in our field when shared with others, but the conference proposal for many of us continues to be a murky genre navigate.

In this blog post, I’ll cover share some of the genre expectations behind the conference proposal and provide you with some tips on writing one. This post is written with a nod to a Swalsian genre analysis perspective of the conference proposal in that it attempts to identify the major moves of the genre. Continue reading