Can Food Insecurity Impact Your Health?

by Linh Ho, HSRC Intern

For low-income individuals and households, health issues and food insecurity are things that tend to go hand in hand. Food insecurity can be generally defined as “the disruption of food intake or eating patterns because of lack of money and other resources” (Healthy People 2020). If you’re skipping meals regularly, or eating less than you might normally eat because there’s not enough money or not enough food in the house, it’s very possible that you fall into the category of being food insecure. Food insecurity comes with a potential for many health problems, and has been strongly correlated with negative health outcomes for both adults and children alike.

When people aren’t access fresh and nutritious food, their quality of life and health can take a serious turn for the worst. Unfortunately, fresh and nutritious foods can be much more expensive than foods that we often consider to be unhealthy, like junk food or fast/convenient foods. Food insecure individuals also tend to have to face the dilemma of having to decide what their income will be going towards each month. For many people, it becomes a competition between food and housing costs, food and school costs, food and medical costs — the list goes on (Feeding America).

So, what usually happens is that food insecure people will go with the cheaper, less nutritious food option because it means they will be able to pay for their other costs of living. However, although cheaper, junk and fast foods when consumed too regularly can lead to chronic health problems such as diabetes, high blood pressure, and heart disease. Or, the opposite might occur and people will end up spending most if not all of their money to feed themselves and their families, especially if they have children. In that case, then they will likely forgo other important but not “urgent” medical expenses, such as doctor’s appointments, health insurance, and even prescription medication. Either way, having to choose between one or the other may have pretty negative consequences for physical health.

In addition, this chronic stress and worry over whether or not you will be able to afford food, housing, school, or other basic life needs takes a toll a person’s mental health as well. Research conducted by Dr. Andrew D. Jones at the University of Michigan found a causal association between food insecurity status and poor mental health (Science Daily). This is likely because being food insecure can cause feelings of stress, alienation, shame, and guilt often associated with anxiety and depression. Having to find and use alternative methods of obtaining food can also come with social stigma that can create feelings of inadequacy or embarrassment.

All in all, food insecurity and health can because of a vicious circle of not so great consequences. The thing is, your health absolutely does not have to suffer, just because you’re in a tight spot with money. There are so many choices, especially as a student here at OSU.

If you’re struggling with affording food, consider one of the following options:

  • Stop by Avery Lodge for one of our Shopping Style Food Pantry events for canned and dry goods, produce, and even butter and eggs!
  • Come to the HSRC during business hours (and non-Food Pantry event days) for an emergency food box and we’ll try to meet your needs.
  • Consider applying for SNAP benefits to help pay for groceries each month.
  • Stop by the HSRC if you have questions or to see how we might be able to help you further!

Recipe Spotlight: Easy Applesauce Muffins

by Linh Ho, HSRC Intern

This super easy recipe for applesauce muffins has less than ten ingredients, many of which can be found either in the HSRC Food Pantry, or in your pantry at home! The stars of this recipe are the pre-made baking mix that can be found in our Food Pantry at Avery Lodge, as well as some unsweetened applesauce that we also have an abundance of.

The baking mix, supplied by the Oregon Food Bank, is very versatile and can be used to make pancakes, biscuits, and even muffins like we are doing today! The unsweetened applesauce also adds some natural sweetness and additional moisture to the muffins. Applesauce can also be used to replace eggs in many recipes. Check out this website for tips!

Onto the recipe, which can be either a sweet treat or even an easy on the go breakfast item!

The ingredients you will need for the muffins:

  • 2 cups of baking mix
  • 1/4 cup of sugar
  • 1 generous teaspoon of cinnamon
  • 1 serving container of unsweetened applesauce (about 1/2 cup)
  • 1/4 cup milk
  • 1 egg
  • 2 tablespoons of oil

For the cinnamon sugar topping:

  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon of cinnamon
  • 2 tablespoons of melted butter

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Combine baking mix, sugar, and cinnamon into a bowl.

  • Stir in applesauce, egg, milk, oil.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Add other mix-ins if desired. I added about a third of a small chopped granny smith apple to half the batter.

  • Fill greased muffin tins with batter, about 2/3 full. Using cupcake liners saves some mess and clean up time!

     

  • Bake the muffins for about 10-12 minutes. They are done when an inserted toothpick comes out clean.

  • Combine the remaining cinnamon and sugar in a shallow dish or bowl. Melt the butter in bowl — be careful with this: remember to cover the bowl with plastic wrap and only heat for about 15 seconds.

  • Gently dip the tops of the muffins into the melted butter and quickly roll into the cinnamon sugar mixture.
  • Enjoy your muffins!

Gettin’ to know the Garden

by Anne Snell

Did you know the HSRC has a garden? That’s right! Just to the East of the building are 7 rows of soil,  and two raised beds. (Or, if you’re directionally challenged like me, the side with the 30-minute parking spots.) There is also a mini orchard which includes dwarf-sized fruit trees like fig, apple, pear, and persimmon. The garden began in the 2016-2017 school year as part of the Growing Food Security Initiative between the HSRC and the Student Sustainability Initiative (SSI).

Two of the garden beds, growing baby kale and pepper plants

If it doesn’t look like much now, it’s because this will actually be the garden’s first year producing a full season of crops!  It takes time for well-producing gardens to form. The Organic Growers Club grew the starts from seed to help us save money. This also helps make sure we get the varieties people want to eat.  The soil conditions are constantly improving, so in a few years, they will be even more nutrient rich than they are now. More nutrients in the soil means more produce!

Colorful Swiss Chard is almost ready to harvest!

This year the garden, which is mostly managed by the SSI, is growing vegetables like Swiss chard, tomatoes, kale, tomatillos, bell peppers, carrots, beets, squash, and garlic. Everything grown in the garden is harvested directly for the HSRC’s Shopping Style Food Pantry nights or Fresh Food Friday. Production is slow right now, but come summer, and into the fall, we will have vegetables galore!

The apples aren’t quite ripe yet, but they will be soon!

 

 

The HSRC Community  Garden isn’t just for  providing fresh produce to the food pantry. It is also a learning environment, where students can get their hands dirty and help grow the food harvested from the garden. In the future we hope students can engaged in the process of growing food, both so they can give back to their community, but also so they can learn the skills required to grow your own food for themselves. The community garden we have is small, and still very young, but growin’ strong!

Recipe spotlight: Egg Fried Rice

Here is a quick fried rice recipe that uses leftovers and pantry staples to create a delicious snack or meal!

Serving size: 4-6 people as a main dish, 6-8 people as a side dish

Ingredients for Egg Fried Rice

  • 4 cups cooked rice – day old is best
  • 1-2 Tablespoons of oil
  • 1 small onion, chopped
  • 1-2 cups vegetables chopped (fresh, frozen, or canned are fine – just drain excess liquid)
  • 2-3 Tablespoons soy sauce (more or less to taste)
  • 4 eggs (1-2 eggs per person)
  • ½-1 Tablespoon of garlic powder(more or less to taste)
  • ½-1 Tablespoon of black pepper (more or less to taste)
  • ½-1 Tablespoon of chicken bouillon powder (more or less to taste)
  • 2 Tbsp optional seasoning/toppings


Notes from the author:
I used brown rice, half of a large onion, two carrots, and four butter pats repurposed from various event leftovers. The dry seasonings are optional and could be replaced or combined with cayenne pepper, paprika, onion powder, mushroom powder, or omitted as desired.  If you want to add meat, fish, or vegetarian protein substitutes, factor in about half to one cup of protein. Note that if you add raw meat or fish, you should chop, cook, and season with salt and pepper before you add the vegetables, rice, etc. Finally, I used sweet chili sauce as an optional topping, but chopped green onions or toasted sesame seeds are also tasty options. 

Instructions for Egg Fried Rice

  • Preheat a large frying pan or wok over medium heat. Add oil of choice.
  • Chop vegetables as needed
chopped onions and carrots
  • Note that you can save vegetable scraps and make vegetable broth
  • Add veggies and dry seasonings to the pan and cook until tender
chopped vegetables in skillet
  • Push the vegetables to the side, and crack the eggs onto the other side.
scramble eggs on one side of skillet
  • Scramble the eggs and then mix eggs and veggies together
  • Add the rice to the veggie and egg mixture 2 cups at a time.
add rice in portions

  • Pour the soy sauce on top.
add soy sauce slowly to fried rice
  • Stir and mix rice until warm
  • Serve with desired toppings
serve fried rice and enjoy warm

 

If you have any leftovers, they’ll last about 1-2 days in the fridge, depending on the age of the leftover rice

Photo credit: Bion Hawkmorr, 2018

Save Money on Groceries!

by Linh Ho, HSRC Intern

Have you ever gone to the grocery store and then walked out 30 minutes later, with over $50 now missing from your bank account and only one bag of groceries to show for it? How does that even happen?

Grocery stores can be expensive, and even the little things can really start to add up. As college students here in Beaver Nation, many of us are already struggling to pay student bills and pay the crazy high rent that Corvallis is becoming notable for, so having enough money to pay for groceries as well can be stressful.

Fear not! There are plenty of ways to ensure that you won’t have to choose between paying for rent or paying for next week’s food.

Before the Store…

  • Check to see what’s in your pantry before shopping.
  • Skim the weekly grocery ads and plan your meals around what’s on sale. Try using multiple sale ingredients for multiple meals!
  • Coupons are our friends! Don’t fight me on this…
  • Make a list of exactly what items you need and strictly stick to it.

In the Store…

  • Carry cash and only use what you have on hand.
  • Use a basket instead of a cart. This will deter you from grabbing unneeded items that will make your basket heavier and harder to carry.
  • Don’t be afraid of generic store brand versions — more often than not, they are exactly the same as the name-brand, and cheaper!
  • Look around or ask about Manager’s Specials, especially for meat or bakery items. These are items that are close to expiring and marked down significantly.
  • Don’t overlook canned fruits and vegetables! They have long shelf lives and can be very versatile and a quick healthy addition to a meal.
  • Ramen can be an awesome meal if you just get creative!
  • Skip pre-washed salads and pre-sliced fruits or cheeses — you can just do it yourself and save some money!
  • Buy seasonal produce. Produce that is in-season is generally much cheaper.
  • Shop from the bulk food bins. This way you’re only paying for what you need, and there will be less food to be wasted! WinCo has a great and affordable bulk foods section, especially for spices and grains.
  • Bring your own reusable grocery bags. Corvallis banned plastic bags in 2012, and you’ll get charged for each paper bag you use at the grocery stores now. Just bring your own and maybe even get a discount for each one you bring at certain stores.
  • Consider signing up to be a member at your favorite grocery store. Lots of stores have special pricing for their members, and point systems that you can trade in for free stuff or discounts — and it’s usually free!

Other tips….

  • If possible, a more plant-based diet might be a good way to save money, since meat can be especially expensive. Try starting out with one meat-free meal a day!
  • If there are sales on certain fresh food items, try stocking up and freezing what you can’t eat right away.
    • Most meat, poultry, and seafood freeze well.
    • You can also freeze fruits before they go bad, or freeze fruits that might not always be in season. You can use them for smoothies, oatmeal, and more!
    • Frozen vegetables are great to have on hand for an easy side dish or quick stir-fry.
    • You can also freeze breads, soups and broths, sauces, herbs, and even cheese! The list goes on….!

You might also be eligible to utilize the HSRC Food Pantry during one of our events each month and pick up some items that might already be on your shopping list.

SNAP or the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (better known as food stamps) is also a great way to help alleviate some strain on groceries each month. Consider applying!

 

Get To Know Our Staff: Linh

Linh, HSRC Intern

Major: Public Health (Health Promotion and Health Behavior)

Career Aspirations

I hope to be able to work with low resource and minority communities to increase access to fresh and healthy food, medical care, and fulfill other basic needs in order to reduce health disparities between social class and race. I truly believe that we as a population can only be as healthy as our weakest components, so I want to be able to help ensure that everyone is provided an equal opportunity to thrive.

 

Why did you want to intern at the HSRC?

My major in Public Health requires an internship, preferably working within an organization relevant to our personal interests and future career goals. The HSRC provides amazing assistance to many students who may be struggling with eating full meals each day, having a safe place to live, having a place to do basic things such as taking a shower or doing laundry, and more! These are the kinds of things that I hope to be able to eventually help other communities access, so that they can live productive and healthy lives without having to worry about these needs that they already deserve simply for being human beings.

 

What will you be working on?

My main project will be focused on the HSRC blog and in curating delicious recipes that can be adapted to use budget friendly ingredients right from our very own Food Pantry.

 

What do you like to do in your free time?

I enjoy spending time with my friends and family when I can, especially taking trips out to the Oregon Coast or up to Portland. I also really enjoy cooking when I have time, mostly because I love to eat! Experimenting with new recipes and new foods is always fun, and I love being able to share my cooking with others.

 

What’s your favorite yummy and cheap meal that you like to make?

It sounds a bit weird but I love to have just white jasmine rice, drizzled with a little bit of soy sauce, and then topped with buttery scrambled eggs and a little bit of pepper. It’s super simple and comforting, and I usually have the ingredients laying around anyway. It’s something that I grew up eating and I could probably eat it any time of the day!

 

What are you favorite things to do in Corvallis?

I like walking around downtown Corvallis and just spending hours wandering through all of the fun shops we have! Plan accordingly though, because most shops in Corvallis close around 5pm. Once in a while, I enjoy eating out in the downtown area. My all time favorite Corvallis restaurant is Koriander, which has amazing Korean fusion food. The Broken Yolk is a must for breakfast, and Benny’s Donuts never disappoints.

 

If you had one wish or chance to use a magic wand, what would you do

Make my student loans ~magically~ disappear (:

Breakfast with a tinge of color

We wanted to bring to you some delicious, quick and simple recipes that can be made with little cost. A bonus is that many of the ingredients used for these recipes can be found at the Oregon State University, Human Service Resource Center food pantry. We decided to play with color and make blue cornbread and vegetable scrambled eggs

To make our cornbread, we chose to use blue cornmeal. This ingredient, one of the lesser grabbed items at the food pantry, served to give our cornbread an interesting blue tinge! To pair with the cornbread, we decided to make some scrambled eggs. As students we usually have a hectic morning, rushing to make a quick breakfast of just eggs. Scrambled eggs with veggies, is a                delicious and healthier alternative to your regular plain ol’ scramble.  

We began with making cornbread, the ingredients included:

Download a PDF of this recipe:  Blue Corn Cornbread – Fifteen Spatulas

  • ¾ cup of butter, at room temperature
  • 1 cup of sugar
  • 3 regular eggs
  • 1.5 cups milk                                           
  • 2 cups of all purpose flour
  • 1 cup of blue corn meal
  • 4.5 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp salt

As you prepare your ingredients, preheat the oven to 400℉.

To prepare the ingredients you will need 3 bowls.

In the first bowl  mix together butter and sugar. Do not worry if you didn’t have enough time to let your butter melt to room temperature. We decided to heat it in the microwave until partially melted.

In the second bowl mix together your eggs and milk.

In the third bowl sift together your flour, blue cornmeal, baking soda and salt.

Add ⅓ of the flour mixture to the sugar/butter mix in the first bowl, then add ½ of the egg/milk mixture. Mix this until all ingredients are absorbed.

   

Repeat this step until the remaining flour mixture and egg/milk mixture are added into the first bowl.

* We did not have an electric mixer, however a fork or whisk were able to serve the same purpose. We do recommend using an electric mixer, as it was quite exhausting trying to mix the ingredients with a fork.

Grease the pan with butter, or pam (if you already have it).

Once mixed, pour the cornbread mixture into a 13 x 9 x 2 inch pan. Or any large pan you have available.

Bake for 22 to 25 minutes. To check that it is cooked stick a toothpick or fork through the middle. If the fork comes out clean, then it is cooked all the way through

Once it’s ready, let it cool off.  We couldn’t wait to eat it, and found out that while still hot it could be quite crumbly.

-This recipe was adapted from Blue Corn Cornbread by Joanne Ozuq at 15spatulas.com

We then prepared the egg recipe: 

Download a PDF of this recipe: Colorful Scrambled Eggs

  • 8 regular eggs
  • 1 large green pepper
  • 3 tomatoes
  • 1 large onion
  • Pepper (to taste)
  • Salt (to taste)
  • 1 cup of milk
  • 1 tbsp of vegetable oil

Start by cubing your tomatoes, onions and green pepper. Then mix in a bowl.

 

Break the eggs in a separate bowl and add 1 cup of milk.

 

*We later found out that 1 cup was too much and recommend using ½ a cup.

Mix the eggs and milk, then pour the mixture into the vegetable bowl.

Add salt and pepper to taste into the mixture.

Heat a large pan and add vegetable oil.

*We did not have a specific temperature to heat it to, so we started on low and gradually increased it.

Once hot, add mixture and scramble with a spatula until ready.

  

 

Here’s a picture of the delicious, complete product!

 

_____________________________________________________________________

Final thoughts from Fatuma and Nikita, two Spring 2018 volunteers:

Volunteering with the food pantry started as a great way to earn service learning hours for a class, but it turned into an eye opening experience. We were able to learn how the food pantry functions, and the great ways it has impacted food insecurity in our community. We were excited for this blogging opportunity to not only expand our knowledge about how the food pantry items may be used, but also share our experience making some interesting recipes. In the future, we look forward to opportunities to experiment with food products we might have overlooked in the past and encourage others to experiment themselves!

 

 

Recipe spotlight: Mashed Potato Flakes

A multi-purpose pantry & recipe ingredient – try mashed potato flakes today!

Mashed potato flakes are one of the few food items that get passed by on food pantry days. Here are some recipes and suggestions about how to use mashed potato flakes beyond just making average mashed potatoes.

Here are two simple ways to use mashed potato flakes in their fresh-out-of-the-bag state.

  • Cornstarch, tapioca starch, or xanthan gum replacement.
  • Use 1 tablespoon of mashed potato flakes per 1 cup of liquid. You can add it directly to your soup or gravy without the need of a slurry (mixing it with water is a necessary step for cornstarch or flour). Stir, let thicken, add more as needed.

    • Breading.
      Pour ½ cup to 1 cup of mashed potato flakes onto a plate. Add salt, pepper, and seasonings to taste. Press fish (or other food items) into flakes on both sides. Bake, deep fry, or pan fry as desired.

    The following recipes involve using mashed potatoes. Prepare mashed potato flakes with water, milk, butter, etc. to mimic desired mashed potatoes used in the recipe.

    Click the links below for the recipes. (photos are from the linked recipes)

    • Shepherd’s Pie.
      Warm comfort food, easily made with meat or vegan substitutes.
    • Croquettes.
      An easily made snack consisting of egg, mashed potato, and whatever fillings you might desire. 
    • Gnocchi.
      Tasty Italian potato pasta. A nice change from instant ramen. 
    • Aligot.
      Creamy cheese-filled mashed potatoes, French-style. 

    Mashed potato flakes are part of the grains section of the food pantry. If you’re tired of rice, pasta, or cereal, consider trying mashed potato flakes instead!

Shopping-Style Food Pantry: What’s it like?

If you’ve never visited the Human Services Resource Center during days when we have a shopping-style food pantry, this post can give you an idea of what to expect.

As a reminder, you can find our schedule on our website – and you can visit during non-shopping style days and we can help make you a box of food.

The front of a mid-century modern looking brown building has stairs to one side and a ramp to the other.
We have a shopping-style food pantry 3-4 times per month. The sign outside our building says Avery House. The building is often named Avery Lodge (like on campus maps). Someday soon, the building will re-named. We know it’s confusing in the interim; unfortunately, there isn’t anything we can do.
a green sandshich board is at teh top of stairs
Anyone who meets income qualifications can visit the HSRC food pantry. This resource is not limited to students.

There is free street parking immediately in front of Avery on Madison Avenue, though it’s often full during the school day. More street parking can be found on adjacent city streets. The parking lot immediately East of Avery is monitored until 5:00 pm, as is the crescent campus lot 1/2 block away to the West. Further details can be found at the OSU parking page.  If you’re stopping in for a quick food box, you may find the 30 minute loading zone spots helpful.

A smiling woman sits behind a table with assorted papers
Before you can get your food, you’ll have to sign in at our welcome desk.

We know that some people might have concerns about data collection and privacy. The information collected on this form is not shared with the broader university. You can read more about our data collection and data philosophy on our website.

A hand is holding a pen and writing information on a form. The top half of the form is obscured by an orange sheet of paper.
Signing in is simple: you’ll just have to record your name, address, household size and sign your name to confirm that you meet income eligibility guidelines. The laminated orange sheet helps us protect the confidentiality of the individuals who signed in before you.

We get most of our food from the Linn Benton Food Share, our regional food bank. Using this sign-in form and following strict confidentiality rules are part of our agreement with them.

A form with text explaining income eligibility and non discrimination policy is obscured by an orange piece of paper.
When you sign in, the form has important information about eligibility criteria and our non-discrimination policy.
Income guidelines are similar to qualifications for other government and community support programs.
text of our non discrimination policy.
We take our non-discrimination policy seriously. If you feel like there is room for improvement, please alert a staff person.
multiple reusable shopping bags are heaped on a table.
If you have reusable bags, please bring them! This helps us keep food costs low. If you forget your bags, don’t worry, we have some paper bags for you to use.
An illustration of a van is on a card, with a capital V and a lowercase v on it. The card itself sits on the arm of a couch.
After you sign in, you’ll be issued a card – we’ll call this when it’s your turn (instead of your name or a number).
While you are waiting you can study at a table. We have wifi in our building and this might be a good time to get some studying done. Ask a staff member if you need to print something and we’ll show you where you can do so.
Couches are arranged in front of a fire place, with decorative squash in the foreground.
We also have couches and chairs to sit on while you wait your turn.
Diet Dr. Pepper and juice boxes are on a table.
We often have snacks available.
Chicken is in a bowl with rice, a cookbook is open to a page with the recipe for it.
Sometimes we have recipe tastings. This is Adobo Chicken from the Good and Cheap Cookbook, which you can check out from the HSRC.
Sometimes we have information about campus and community resources tabling at our pantry. Be sure to check these out, they’re often really helpful!
A volunteer wearing an apron holds up a card with an illustrated van on it and a capital V and a lowercase v
Keep an ear and an eye out for your turn. A volunteer or a staff person will hold up a card that matches the one you were given when you checked in.
Its your turn when a volunteer holds up a card that is the same as yours.
The volunteer or staff person will have a card that looks similar to this- and will help you keep track of how much food you’re able to take home. This is based on recommendations from the USDA and is a recommendation based on how much food a household of your size might need for about a week. This card is for a household size of 2 people.
Stacked of red and black shopping baskets
We have shopping baskets for you to use.

First, you’ll get to choose the fresh produce options you’d like to take home to your family.

Onions in a wooden crate.
In the winter months, sometimes we have fewer produce options.
Colorful berries are in green berry baskets
In the summer months, we sometimes have berries and carrots and broccolini.
Herbs and celery and parsnips and fennel
Sometimes our produce selection includes celery and fennel and parsnips and even herbs.

On average, each household that visits the HSRC gets about 5 lbs of produce per visit. We get some of our produce from the Linn Benton Food Share or from members of our communities with abundant home gardens. We are especially grateful for community gardens like Produce for the People and our partnership with the Student Sustainability Initiative, Growing Food Security who help us be generous with produce at the HSRC.

A white board is on a silver surface
Each freezer contains different items. The numbers indicate how many servings the item counts for. In this case, a whole chicken is four servings of protein.
Our freezers can also sometimes have frozen meals or frozen vegetables.
Eggs and margarine on a tray, on a black table
We usually distribute eggs and margarine on a one-per-household basis.

After you shop for fresh produce and frozen items, you’ll move into our dry-good storage area where you can choose from the shelf-stable items.

If you like raisins, we almost always have lots of them! This is our canned fruits and vegetable section. Each canned item usually counts as one serving.
We also have non-meat proteins like beans and nut butters.

If you have dietary restrictions or food allergies, let the volunteer or staff person who’s assisting you know – we’ll make sure you get extra of something else to make things equitable. You don’t have to take home anything you don’t like or don’t need.

Sometimes we get items that are bagged and labeled like these oats. The state and regional food banks buy this food in bulk and do a re-package like this to help pantries like ours feed our communities at very low cost. Bagged items like this usually count as two servings.
white aseptic containers of chicken stock
Sometimes the food we get from the food pantry network has unusual labels or packaging. This is turkey stock.
silver bag of beef stew
This silver-packaging is a bag of beef stew.
bagged beans
This is a mix of beans, perfect for soup or chili.
Cereals, grains and pastas on shelves
We also have a selection of cereals, pastas, and other grains.
Bags of coffee and boxes of tea
Sometimes we get things like coffee and tea, snacks or other items. These are often one-per-household distribution items.
bagged tampons and pads
We often have a selection of menstruation products.
diapers and other items on a wire shelf
We don’t often have baby-items like diapers, but sometimes we do!
After you’re done shopping, we can help bag your items.

Once a volunteer has called your name, most people spend 15-20 minutes shopping for their groceries. We usually have a lot to choose from.

Two people wearing aprons smile for the camera.
Anyone wearing an apron is either a staff or a volunteer. We’re happy to answer any questions you have.

On average, the HSRC provides 18 lbs of food per individual. If you’re a household of two, this means an average of 32 lbs of food!