HSRC PRESENTS: COOKING CLASSES!

 

Eating is one of life’s greatest pleasures. In an ideal world, healthy and delicious food would be all around and easily accessible to everyone. But we all know that it is not a perfect world and there are several barriers keeping us from eating nourishing food. Money and time should not be among the reasons. As college students with very busy schedules and not a whole lot of money, making delicious and healthy meals can be challenging.If you can gain a few more kitchen skills, you can be creative with the ingredients available to you and make some healthy and fun meals.

The cooking classes this Spring at the HSRC are FREE and focused on empowering the participants with basic cooking skills. The recipes that will be used are easy, cheap and quick, because yes, we always have tons of homework and deadlines to beat, but of course we need to eat healthy yummy food too!

Rice Every Which Way- April 17th, 5-7pm.

Versatile ingredients save meals time and money! Rice is definitely one of them. Boiled rice on its own is not very difficult to make, but it can be pretty bland and definitely get old. In this class we will be playing around with herbs, spices and vegetables (more vegetables=more flavor) to make rice healthy, tasty and fun. The other amazing thing about rice is that you can make a lot of it over the weekend and make different meals from it, all week long to save a lot of time. Rice is one of those staples that you can have for breakfast, lunch or dinner.

Ramen Revamped-May 3rd, 5-7pm. 

We have all lived off one too many Ramen bowls at one point in our lives. They are quick and easy, and don’t require any cooking skill but most of all they are cheap! while we have certainly come to accept Ramen as part of ‘the college experience,’ we can have fun making it  healthier, tasty and more nourishing.

 

Knead Bread?  May 15th, 5-7pm.

When you consider the simple ingredients that form the foundation of all breads—flour, yeast, salt and water—it’s truly remarkable how many varied products can be made from it. Bread baking can often seem very intimidating and complicated. This class will be focused on stove top breads, which can be an easier and cheaper alternative.We want to empower you to feed yourself, and take your baking skills to the next level!

 

 

Cheap and Gourmet- May 31st, 5-7pm.

Good and cheap! Eating healthy and tasty food while on a budget can be a real hustle. This class is designed to explore ways you can create an amazing meal with simple affordable ingredients. Improvisation is the soul of great cooking! Our hope is after this class you will be able to tailor things to your taste and preference all while on a budget!

Registration is recommended not required. Click here to sign up!  The classes will be held at Avery Lodge.  

We are looking forward to cooking with you!

Save Money on Groceries!

Have you ever gone to the grocery store and then walked out 30 minutes later, with over $50 now missing from your bank account and only one bag of groceries to show for it? How does that even happen?

Grocery stores can be expensive, and even the little things can really start to add up. As college students here in Beaver Nation, many of us are already struggling to pay student bills and pay the crazy high rent that Corvallis is becoming notable for, so having enough money to pay for groceries as well can be stressful.

Fear not! There are plenty of ways to ensure that you won’t have to choose between paying for rent or paying for next week’s food.

Before the Store…

  • Check to see what’s in your pantry before shopping.
  • Skim the weekly grocery ads and plan your meals around what’s on sale. Try using multiple sale ingredients for multiple meals!
  • Coupons are our friends! Don’t fight me on this…
  • Make a list of exactly what items you need and strictly stick to it.

In the Store…

  • Carry cash and only use what you have on hand.
  • Use a basket instead of a cart. This will deter you from grabbing unneeded items that will make your basket heavier and harder to carry.
  • Don’t be afraid of generic store brand versions — more often than not, they are exactly the same as the name-brand, and cheaper!
  • Look around or ask about Manager’s Specials, especially for meat or bakery items. These are items that are close to expiring and marked down significantly.
  • Don’t overlook canned fruits and vegetables! They have long shelf lives and can be very versatile and a quick healthy addition to a meal.
  • Ramen can be an awesome meal if you just get creative!
  • Skip pre-washed salads and pre-sliced fruits or cheeses — you can just do it yourself and save some money!
  • Buy seasonal produce. Produce that is in-season is generally much cheaper.
  • Shop from the bulk food bins. This way you’re only paying for what you need, and there will be less food to be wasted! WinCo has a great and affordable bulk foods section, especially for spices and grains.
  • Bring your own reusable grocery bags. Corvallis banned plastic bags in 2012, and you’ll get charged for each paper bag you use at the grocery stores now. Just bring your own and maybe even get a discount for each one you bring at certain stores.
  • Consider signing up to be a member at your favorite grocery store. Lots of stores have special pricing for their members, and point systems that you can trade in for free stuff or discounts — and it’s usually free!

Other tips….

  • If possible, a more plant-based diet might be a good way to save money, since meat can be especially expensive. Try starting out with one meat-free meal a day!
  • If there are sales on certain fresh food items, try stocking up and freezing what you can’t eat right away.
    • Most meat, poultry, and seafood freeze well.
    • You can also freeze fruits before they go bad, or freeze fruits that might not always be in season. You can use them for smoothies, oatmeal, and more!
    • Frozen vegetables are great to have on hand for an easy side dish or quick stir-fry.
    • You can also freeze breads, soups and broths, sauces, herbs, and even cheese! The list goes on….!

You might also be eligible to utilize the HSRC Food Pantry during one of our events each month and pick up some items that might already be on your shopping list.

SNAP or the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (better known as food stamps) is also a great way to help alleviate some strain on groceries each month. Consider applying!

 

Get To Know Our Staff: Linh

Linh, HSRC Intern

Major: Public Health (Health Promotion and Health Behavior)

Career Aspirations

I hope to be able to work with low resource and minority communities to increase access to fresh and healthy food, medical care, and fulfill other basic needs in order to reduce health disparities between social class and race. I truly believe that we as a population can only be as healthy as our weakest components, so I want to be able to help ensure that everyone is provided an equal opportunity to thrive.

 

Why did you want to intern at the HSRC?

My major in Public Health requires an internship, preferably working within an organization relevant to our personal interests and future career goals. The HSRC provides amazing assistance to many students who may be struggling with eating full meals each day, having a safe place to live, having a place to do basic things such as taking a shower or doing laundry, and more! These are the kinds of things that I hope to be able to eventually help other communities access, so that they can live productive and healthy lives without having to worry about these needs that they already deserve simply for being human beings.

 

What will you be working on?

My main project will be focused on the HSRC blog and in curating delicious recipes that can be adapted to use budget friendly ingredients right from our very own Food Pantry.

 

What do you like to do in your free time?

I enjoy spending time with my friends and family when I can, especially taking trips out to the Oregon Coast or up to Portland. I also really enjoy cooking when I have time, mostly because I love to eat! Experimenting with new recipes and new foods is always fun, and I love being able to share my cooking with others.

 

What’s your favorite yummy and cheap meal that you like to make?

It sounds a bit weird but I love to have just white jasmine rice, drizzled with a little bit of soy sauce, and then topped with buttery scrambled eggs and a little bit of pepper. It’s super simple and comforting, and I usually have the ingredients laying around anyway. It’s something that I grew up eating and I could probably eat it any time of the day!

 

What are you favorite things to do in Corvallis?

I like walking around downtown Corvallis and just spending hours wandering through all of the fun shops we have! Plan accordingly though, because most shops in Corvallis close around 5pm. Once in a while, I enjoy eating out in the downtown area. My all time favorite Corvallis restaurant is Koriander, which has amazing Korean fusion food. The Broken Yolk is a must for breakfast, and Benny’s Donuts never disappoints.

 

If you had one wish or chance to use a magic wand, what would you do

Make my student loans ~magically~ disappear (:

Breakfast with a tinge of color

We wanted to bring to you some delicious, quick and simple recipes that can be made with little cost. A bonus is that many of the ingredients used for these recipes can be found at the Oregon State University, Human Service Resource Center food pantry. We decided to play with color and make blue cornbread and vegetable scrambled eggs

To make our cornbread, we chose to use blue cornmeal. This ingredient, one of the lesser grabbed items at the food pantry, served to give our cornbread an interesting blue tinge! To pair with the cornbread, we decided to make some scrambled eggs. As students we usually have a hectic morning, rushing to make a quick breakfast of just eggs. Scrambled eggs with veggies, is a                delicious and healthier alternative to your regular plain ol’ scramble.  

We began with making cornbread, the ingredients included:

Download a PDF of this recipe:  Blue Corn Cornbread – Fifteen Spatulas

  • ¾ cup of butter, at room temperature
  • 1 cup of sugar
  • 3 regular eggs
  • 1.5 cups milk                                           
  • 2 cups of all purpose flour
  • 1 cup of blue corn meal
  • 4.5 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp salt

As you prepare your ingredients, preheat the oven to 400℉.

To prepare the ingredients you will need 3 bowls.

In the first bowl  mix together butter and sugar. Do not worry if you didn’t have enough time to let your butter melt to room temperature. We decided to heat it in the microwave until partially melted.

In the second bowl mix together your eggs and milk.

In the third bowl sift together your flour, blue cornmeal, baking soda and salt.

Add ⅓ of the flour mixture to the sugar/butter mix in the first bowl, then add ½ of the egg/milk mixture. Mix this until all ingredients are absorbed.

   

Repeat this step until the remaining flour mixture and egg/milk mixture are added into the first bowl.

* We did not have an electric mixer, however a fork or whisk were able to serve the same purpose. We do recommend using an electric mixer, as it was quite exhausting trying to mix the ingredients with a fork.

Grease the pan with butter, or pam (if you already have it).

Once mixed, pour the cornbread mixture into a 13 x 9 x 2 inch pan. Or any large pan you have available.

Bake for 22 to 25 minutes. To check that it is cooked stick a toothpick or fork through the middle. If the fork comes out clean, then it is cooked all the way through

Once it’s ready, let it cool off.  We couldn’t wait to eat it, and found out that while still hot it could be quite crumbly.

-This recipe was adapted from Blue Corn Cornbread by Joanne Ozuq at 15spatulas.com

We then prepared the egg recipe: 

Download a PDF of this recipe: Colorful Scrambled Eggs

  • 8 regular eggs
  • 1 large green pepper
  • 3 tomatoes
  • 1 large onion
  • Pepper (to taste)
  • Salt (to taste)
  • 1 cup of milk
  • 1 tbsp of vegetable oil

Start by cubing your tomatoes, onions and green pepper. Then mix in a bowl.

 

Break the eggs in a separate bowl and add 1 cup of milk.

 

*We later found out that 1 cup was too much and recommend using ½ a cup.

Mix the eggs and milk, then pour the mixture into the vegetable bowl.

Add salt and pepper to taste into the mixture.

Heat a large pan and add vegetable oil.

*We did not have a specific temperature to heat it to, so we started on low and gradually increased it.

Once hot, add mixture and scramble with a spatula until ready.

  

 

Here’s a picture of the delicious, complete product!

 

_____________________________________________________________________

Final thoughts from Fatuma and Nikita, two Spring 2018 volunteers:

Volunteering with the food pantry started as a great way to earn service learning hours for a class, but it turned into an eye opening experience. We were able to learn how the food pantry functions, and the great ways it has impacted food insecurity in our community. We were excited for this blogging opportunity to not only expand our knowledge about how the food pantry items may be used, but also share our experience making some interesting recipes. In the future, we look forward to opportunities to experiment with food products we might have overlooked in the past and encourage others to experiment themselves!

 

 

Recipe spotlight: Mashed Potato Flakes

A multi-purpose pantry & recipe ingredient – try mashed potato flakes today!

Mashed potato flakes are one of the few food items that get passed by on food pantry days. Here are some recipes and suggestions about how to use mashed potato flakes beyond just making average mashed potatoes.

Here are two simple ways to use mashed potato flakes in their fresh-out-of-the-bag state.

  • Cornstarch, tapioca starch, or xanthan gum replacement.
  • Use 1 tablespoon of mashed potato flakes per 1 cup of liquid. You can add it directly to your soup or gravy without the need of a slurry (mixing it with water is a necessary step for cornstarch or flour). Stir, let thicken, add more as needed.

    • Breading.
      Pour ½ cup to 1 cup of mashed potato flakes onto a plate. Add salt, pepper, and seasonings to taste. Press fish (or other food items) into flakes on both sides. Bake, deep fry, or pan fry as desired.

    The following recipes involve using mashed potatoes. Prepare mashed potato flakes with water, milk, butter, etc. to mimic desired mashed potatoes used in the recipe.

    Click the links below for the recipes. (photos are from the linked recipes)

    • Shepherd’s Pie.
      Warm comfort food, easily made with meat or vegan substitutes.
    • Croquettes.
      An easily made snack consisting of egg, mashed potato, and whatever fillings you might desire. 
    • Gnocchi.
      Tasty Italian potato pasta. A nice change from instant ramen. 
    • Aligot.
      Creamy cheese-filled mashed potatoes, French-style. 

    Mashed potato flakes are part of the grains section of the food pantry. If you’re tired of rice, pasta, or cereal, consider trying mashed potato flakes instead!

“Call CN!”: The Life and Times of an HSRC GTA

By Carmen Wilson

You ever had a tough interaction with your supervisor that makes you think, “I wish my boss would _________”? Rough day at work where you run to the nearest Netflix account with a beverage of choice in hand? I’ve had both those scenarios and then some working at the HSRC. But I can count those moments on one needs-a-manicure-badly-from-stress-induced nail biting hand (post-graduate school job searches are exhausting!). Now that the crappy feelings are out of the way, here’s a bit of a run-down about my experience working at the HSRC.

Why did you decide to work at the HSRC:

I felt good vibes following my interview – and was very curious about the innovative and unique work happening at the HSRC. I was excited by the opportunity to work with students from low-income backgrounds, as I myself have that experience. I thought that working at the HSRC would help me get hands-on applicable theory-to-practice work.

How is office culture?

Staff (pro-staff, grad staff and student staff) share their successes and celebrations, mull and dialogue over how we can enhance the office, express their concerns and emotions in a safe space and brave space environment. Need a mental health day off? Boom, go refill your empty cup. Taking time off for professional development opportunities? Have a blast and share your experience if you feel comfortable. Staff do not have to fear being who they are at the HSRC; every part of your wellness and growth are noticed and nurtured by the whole team.

What was your supervisory experience like at the HSRC?

Supervision under Nicole Hindes, the current and only professional staff member, is a whirlwind experience. You may be thinking, “Is that a good thing? Whirlwinds sounds scary!” Trust me, it is. Nicole holds social and racial justice as top priorities. This plays out in staff members representing diverse identities, in particular hiring from the populations we serve. Authenticity to whatever your comfort level may be is encouraged. As a Black, queer, non-binary first generation person from a low-income background, I was able to show up to work and not fear my identities jeopardizing my job.

What is the work like at the HSRC?

Parlaying into the next topic: space is created to strengthen staff members’ professional voice and know-how. Staff has incredible autonomy over projects. From creation to evaluation, staff’s sense of pride grows exponentially with each successful endeavor they embark on. This showed up in me being the co-chair of the annual Hunger and Houselessness Action Week. Along with my fellow co-chair, we had full autonomy of the events. I also see these traits show up with student workers and student leaders who are pitching in.

What about balancing academics and working at the HSRS?

It is difficult to do- but manageable. I found that communication is key, both with student staff and the rest of the leadership team. I have been able to utilize student development theory (Perry, for example) when supporting student staff in their roles, by identifying their development level and integrating empathy and encouragement into my approach to helping them with their work. In another class, when we had to look at how budgets work, Nicole shared the HSRC budget with transparency and helped me understand challenging concepts because I was able to look at a real budget. Nicole makes space for you to attend classes and get academic development – like going to different events, having time for internship opportunities, etc. I was able to complete two internships, work at the HSRC, other time spent in my class and managing my job search. While doing all this at once was challenging, I was successful – I anticipate starting my next full time job in April.

What is your takeaway?

At the beginning of my GTA experience, it was a challenging transition as I adjusted to some hurdles and setbacks – stemming from both my own transition into the role but also lots of growing pains stemming from the HSRC transitioning in multiple programmatic ways (like our new building, for example).  But as we enhanced our office operations, hired stellar staff, and figured out how to maximize our beautiful new space, I was able to not only find my groove, but find my growth as a GTA. I will carry the skills and experience I gathered from my two years as a GTA for the rest of my professional career. If you are reading this as an future grad student, consider yourself lucky. You have just entered one of the most innovative, transformational offices in student affairs. A great resume builder and interview piece FYI.

Food Recall: Nutritional Yeast

URGENT FOOD RECALL

Oregon Food Bank voluntarily recalls nutritional yeast

March 16, 2018 – Oregon Food Bank is voluntarily recalling 1,219 pounds of nutritional yeast, which was donated to the food bank. No illness has been reported but it was donated at the same time as two other recalled products – chia and pumpkin seeds.

The nutritional yeast was distributed in Oregon and Clark County, Washington through the Oregon Food Bank Network of regional food banks and participating food pantries. The product was distributed in one pound plastic poly film bags with a twist-type closure or a re-sealable pouch. All nutritional yeast was distributed between November 1, 2017 and March 16, 2018. See attached product label for ease of identification.

Individuals should dispose of the product immediately. Any questions should be directed to Oregon Food Bank’s Facilities and Regulatory Compliance Manager Ryan Wist at 503-419-4160.

 

About Oregon Food Bank

Oregon Food Bank works to eliminate hunger and its root causes… because no one should be hungry. Oregon Food Bank believes that hunger starves the human spirit, that communities thrive when people are nourished, and that everyone deserves healthy and fresh food. Oregon Food Bank helps feed the human spirit of 740,000 people through a food distribution network of 21 regional food banks serving Oregon and Clark County, Washington. Oregon Food Bank also leads statewide efforts to increase resources for hungry families and to eliminate the root causes of hunger through public policy, local food systems work, nutrition and garden education, health care screening and innovative programming. Find out how to feed the human spirit at oregonfoodbank.org.

Food Recall: Pumpkin Seeds

URGENT FOOD RECALL

Oregon Food Bank voluntarily recalls pumpkin seeds

March 16, 2018 – As a result of the ongoing recall of donated chia seeds that began on March 12, 2018, Oregon Food Bank has initiated a voluntary recall of 63,825 pounds of pumpkin seeds received on the same donation. These donated pumpkin seeds have the potential to be contaminated with Listeria species. While no illnesses have been reported we are recalling this product out of an abundance of caution.

The pumpkin seeds were distributed in Oregon and Clark County, Washington through the Oregon Food Bank Network of regional food banks and participating food pantries. The product was distributed in one pound plastic poly film bags with a twist-type closure or a re-sealable pouch or a KALE JOY plastic bag. All pumpkin seeds were distributed between November 1, 2017 and March 16, 2018. See attached images for ease of identification.

Listeria species can include Listeria monocytogenes an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria monocytogenes infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women. Anyone who has consumed these pumpkin seeds and is experiencing symptoms of food borne illness should consult with their primary physician or county health department.

Individuals should dispose of the product immediately. Any questions should be directed to Oregon Food Bank’s Facilities and Regulatory Compliance Manager Ryan Wist at 503-419-4160.

About Oregon Food Bank

Oregon Food Bank works to eliminate hunger and its root causes… because no one should be hungry. Oregon Food Bank believes that hunger starves the human spirit, that communities thrive when people are nourished, and that everyone deserves healthy and fresh food. Oregon Food Bank helps feed the human spirit of 740,000 people through a food distribution network of 21 regional food banks serving Oregon and Clark County, Washington. Oregon Food Bank also leads statewide efforts to increase resources for hungry families and to eliminate the root causes of hunger through public policy, local food systems work, nutrition and garden education, health care screening and innovative programming. Find out how to feed the human spirit atoregonfoodbank.org.

Food Recall: Chia Seeds

URGENT FOOD RECALL

Oregon Food Bank issues alert on foreign material in chia seeds

PORTLAND, Ore. – March 12, 2018 – Oregon Food Bank of Portland, Oregon has initiated a Class II recall of 22,201 pounds of chia seeds, which were donated to the food bank. The product may be contaminated with rodent droppings. While no known illnesses have been associated with this product, use or consumption may present a health hazard to consumers.

The chia seeds were distributed in Oregon and Clark County, Washington through the Oregon Food Bank Network of regional food banks and participating food pantries. The product was distributed in one pound plastic poly film bags with a twist-type closure or a re-sealable pouch. All chia seeds distributed in the described packaging between November 1, 2017 and March 9, 2018 are included. See images of product labels for ease of identification.

bagged chia seeds bagged chia seeds

Consumers should dispose of the product immediately and can get additional information by contacting the food pantry where they received the product or from Oregon Food Bank’s Facilities and Regulatory Compliance Manager Ryan Wist at 403-419-4160. Anyone who has consumed these chia seeds and is experiencing symptoms of food borne illness should consult with their primary physician or county health department.

The issue was discovered through investigation of a customer complaint regarding foreign material. Product which was still in inventory at Oregon Food Bank was determined to contain rodent droppings. Subsequent investigation indicates the chia seeds were observed to have evidence of rodent activity by the donor, Live Local Organic of Milwaukie, Oregon. The recall was initiated after it was determined all chia seeds received in this donation might be at risk.

About Oregon Food Bank

Oregon Food Bank works to eliminate hunger and its root causes… because no one should be hungry. Oregon Food Bank believes that hunger starves the human spirit, that communities thrive when people are nourished, and that everyone deserves healthy and fresh food. Oregon Food Bank helps feed the human spirit of 740,000 people through a food distribution network of 21 regional food banks serving Oregon and Clark County, Washington. Oregon Food Bank also leads statewide efforts to increase resources for hungry families and to eliminate the root causes of hunger through public policy, local food systems work, nutrition and garden education, health care screening and innovative programming. Find out how to feed the human spirit at oregonfoodbank.org.

The HSRC is recruiting for a Case Manager

We are excited to announce that the Human Services Resource Center (HSRC) at Oregon State University is recruiting for a Case Manager for students in financial crisis. Questions or inquiries about this posting should only be directed to Molly Chambers, search chair – molly.chambers@oregonstate.edu.

 

The Human Services Resource Center is currently seeking a full-time (1.0 FTE) Case Manager at Oregon State University. This position will work in close partnership with the HSRC Assistant Director, serve on the HSRC Leadership Team, and foster relationships with both campus and community partnerships to assist students in accessing resources and solutions for increased retention and student success.  The Case Manager will be responsible for offering case management services using a social justice and equity based framework, in addition to maintaining a database and subsequent reporting processes for HSRC case management. This role will primarily oversee the HSRC Emergency Housing Program and serve as the main point of contact for OSU Corvallis campus students experiencing homelessness as well as students navigating social services in the Corvallis community. Additionally, this position will assist students experiencing financial insecurity through advocacy and partnership with the OSU Financial Aid office and OSU Financial Care Team to help students maximize all of their financial aid options that best serves their needs.

The working, student-facing title for this role will be Basic Needs Navigator.

For more details and to apply online, visit https://jobs.oregonstate.edu/postings/56948

An archived PDF of the position posting can be found at this link: Basic Needs Navigator Position Description Final

Deadline for applications is April 11, 2018.

About the HSRC:

Approximately 10 years ago, a group of OSU students saw the need for additional support for the classmates they saw experiencing housing and food insecurities. These students formally proposed a Human Services Resource Center that would be a one-stop location where students could get their basic needs met. Today, a national leader in this work, the HSRC remains committed to centering the voices of students, empowering and engaging them in college retention solutions and helping students meet their academic goals despite the challenges of being under-resourced.  Essential services provided by the HSRC include the HSRC Food Pantry, the Textbook Lending Program, Food Assistance program, and Emergency Housing resources. The HSRC is part of the suite of programs supported by the Office of Student Life and is almost exclusively student-fee funded. Further information about the HSRC can be found on its website: http://studentlife.oregonstate.edu/hsrc