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Archive for the ‘Graduate Students’ Category

God in Gotham: Jon Butler’s Re-examination of Secular vs Sacred in New York City

Tuesday, November 26th, 2013

by Emily Simpson* On Thursday November 21, Oregon State’s School of History, Philosophy, and Religion was privileged to welcome esteemed scholar of American religious history Jon Butler as part of the Horning Lecture Series.  His presentation God in Gotham is an interesting re-interpretation of the relationship between religious and secular aspects of life in New [...]

James Moore Illuminates Darwin’s Sacred Cause

Monday, November 4th, 2013

by Mason Tattersall* Last Tuesday the Horning Lecture Series was pleased to present James Moore’s engrossing lecture on Darwin’s Sacred Cause. Moore, along with Adrian Desmond, penned one of the classic biographies of Darwin (1991’s Darwin).  As Moore related in his opening remarks on Tuesday, when the two had finished with Darwin, they were left [...]

Mapping the Universe with Robert Fox

Wednesday, May 8th, 2013

by Laura Cray* As a self-professed library nerd, I was excited to attend Robert Fox’s lecture, Mapping the Universe of Knowledge, on Monday, May 6, 2013.  The lecture focused on work of Paul Otlet, Henri La Fontaine, and Hendrick Christian Andersen and their vision for a world united by knowledge.  Robert Fox is professor emeritus [...]

Reflection: Archambeau and the Voice as a Vessel of Healing

Wednesday, March 13th, 2013

by Tracy Jamison* Words are potent. Words can awaken memories, stir emotions and quiet the mind. Words have been used in the creation of groundswells that burst forth to bring down stalwart walls of injustice as well as to buttress vast empires: Word-for-word, Brick-by-brick. In her lecture, Dr. Nicole Archambeau examined the concept of the [...]

Reflection: Digital Newton Project

Friday, March 8th, 2013

By Jindan Chen* Before going to Rob Iliffe’s talk on The Newton’s Project on February 28th, I skimmed through this incredibly comprehensive website about Isaac Newton. Absolutely, it is an exciting on-line read. “The Newton Project” is the name of a non-profit organization which builds up this website. The primary goal of this website is [...]

Linda Richards Disrupts the Technocratic Narrative

Tuesday, January 29th, 2013

Congratulations to Ph.D. student Linda Richards, who has published an article in Peace and Change: A Journal of Peace Research!  The title is “Fallout Suits and Human Rights: Disrupting the Technocratic Narrative,” and it challenges the way we think about radiation effects historically.  As she writes, “the topic of radiation exposure is a disputed maze [...]

New History of Science ABDs

Monday, December 10th, 2012

OSU’s History of Science Program congratulates three of our graduate student veterans this term, as they advanced to candidacy during Week 10.  They now have the vaunted status of “ABD,” which either means “all but dissertation” or “anything but dissertation,” depending on how you look at it  It was a pleasure to be part of [...]

Reflection: Bolzano and Brentano

Thursday, October 25th, 2012

  by Andre Hahn* On October 17, Professor David Luft gave a lecture entitled “Philosophy and Science in Nineteenth-Century Austria: Bernard Bolzano (1781-1848) and Franz Brentano (1838-1917).”  The theme of Professor Luft’s talk was to give Bolzano and Brentano more credit and attention than they normally receive among English speaking historians and philosophers.  Bolzano warrants [...]

Reflection: Bristlecone Pines Between History and Imagination

Tuesday, October 16th, 2012

by Laura Cray* On October 14, James Capshew invited his audience at the Autzen House Center for the Humanities to stop and smell the pine cones—or at least contemplate their place in the human understanding of time.  His lecture entitled, “The Fascinations of Age: Bristlecone Pines Between History and Imagination,” explored Capshew’s most recent research [...]

A Chronicle of the School Cafeteria

Monday, October 1st, 2012

by Tracy Jamison*    “There ain’t no such thing as free lunch…”  Economics in eight words, El Paso Herald-Post (June 27, 1938)  Recently, when the first lady Michelle Obama and Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced the new school lunch nutrition guidelines, there were some critiques that the current administration had overstepped their bounds and become [...]

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