Sep
11

Deep chlorophyll maximum spotted far offshore

Filed Under (Biology/Biological Oceanography, OR coast, seagliders, SG130) by Amanda Whitmire on 11-09-2009

I was checking out the latest plots from SG130 yesterday, and I noticed a very interesting feature. The glider is a ways south of Newport, over 100 km offshore, heading northbound. In the last several profiles, in addition to a surface chlorophyll peak (~50 m), there appears a second chlorophyll maximum around 200 meters. Check it out:

Surface and subsurface chlorophyll signals off of the Oregon coast, Fall 2009

Surface and subsurface chlorophyll signals off of the Oregon coast, Fall 2009

The feature shows up in the backscattering data, too, and is not associated with any change in water mass characteristics (temperature or salinity). Is the deep chlorophyll max (DCM) an older surface bloom that has been advected offshore and is now sinking out? It would be neat to look at the glider and satellite data going back in time to see if I could track the origin of this DCM. Time to hit the literature and refresh my memory on the coastal dynamics of  summer phytoplankton blooms off of Oregon. Any thoughts from our readers on origins of this feature, and whether or not it is an annual occurrence? I’ve got SG130 data from last summer, too…

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1 Comment So Far

Laura M on 21 June, 2010 at 21:23 #
    

Hey there! Thanks for the great article. It’s very interesting. I’ll be bookmarking this page and passing it onto my friends too. Keep writing, cheers!


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