GEMM Lab 2016: A Year in the Life

By Dawn Barlow, MSc Student, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Oregon State University

The year is rapidly coming to a close, and what a busy year it has been in the Geospatial Ecology of Marine Megafauna Lab! In 2016, our members have traveled to six continents for work (all seven if we can carry Rachael’s South African conference over from the end of 2015…), led field seasons in polar, temperate, and tropical waters, presented at international conferences, processed and analyzed data, and published results. Now winter finds us holed up in our offices in Newport, and various projects are ramping up and winding down. With all of the recent turmoil 2016 has brought, it is a nice to reflect on the good work that was accomplished over the last 12 months. In writing this, I am reminded of how grateful I am to work with this talented group of people!

The year started with a flurry of field activity from our southern hemisphere projects! Erin spent her second season on the Antarctic peninsula, where she contributed to the Palmer Station Long Term Ecological Research Project.

Erin collecting a crabeater seal scat sample.
Erin in action collecting a crabeater seal scat sample along the West Antarctic Peninsula.


Aerial image of the research vessel and a pair of blue whales during the 2016 New Zealand survey.
Aerial image of the research vessel and a pair of blue whales during the 2016 New Zealand survey.

The New Zealand blue whale project launched a comprehensive field effort in January and February, and it was a fruitful season to say the least. The team deployed hydrophones, collected tissue biopsy and fecal samples, and observed whales feeding, racing and nursing. The data collected by the blue whale team is currently being analyzed to aid in conservation efforts of these endangered animals living in the constant presence of the oil and gas industry.

Midway atoll is home to one of the largest albatross colony in the world, and Rachael visited during the winter breeding season. In addition to deploying tracking devices to study flight heights and potential conflict with wind energy development, she became acutely aware of the hazards facing these birds, including egg predation by mice and the consumption of plastic debris.

Laysan albatross equipped with a GPS data logger.
Laysan albatross equipped with a GPS data logger.
Fledgling from last year with a stomach full of plastic.
Fledgling from last year with a stomach full of plastic.

Early summertime brought red-legged kittiwakes to the remote Pribilof Islands in Alaska to nest, and Rachael met them there to study their physiology and behavior.

Rachael with a noosepole on St. George Island, Alaska
Rachael with a noosepole on St. George Island, Alaska
Solene with Dr. Claire Garrigue during fieldwork at the Chesterfield Reefs, New Caledonia.
Solene with Dr. Claire Garrigue during fieldwork at the Chesterfield Reefs, New Caledonia.

As the weather warmed for us in the northern hemisphere, Solene spent the austral winter with the humpback whales on their breeding grounds in New Caledonia. Her team traveled to the Chesterfield Reefs, where they collected tissue biopsy samples and photo-IDs, and recorded the whale’s songs. But Solene studies far more than just these whales! She is thoroughly examining every piece of environmental, physical, and oceanographic data she can get her hands on in an effort to build a thorough model of humpback whale distribution and habitat use.

A humpback whale in New Caledonia's South Lagoon.
A humpback whale in New Caledonia’s South Lagoon.

Summertime came to Oregon, and the gray whales returned to these coastal waters. Leigh, Leila, and Todd launched into fieldwork on the gray whale stress physiology project. The poop-scooping, drone-flying team has gotten a fair bit of press recently, follow this link to listen to more!

The overhead drone captures a pair of gray whales surfacing between kelp beds off Cape Blanco, Oregon, with the research vessel nearby. Take under NOAA/NMFS permit #16111 given to John Calambokidis.
The overhead drone captures a pair of gray whales surfacing between kelp beds off Cape Blanco, Oregon, with the research vessel nearby. Take under NOAA/NMFS permit #16111 given to John Calambokidis.

And while Leigh, Leila, and Todd followed the grays from the water, Florence and her team watched them from shore in Port Orford, tracking their movement and behavior. In an effort to gain a better understanding of the foraging ecology of these whales, Florence and crew also sampled their mysid prey from a trusty research kayak.

Florence and the summer 2016 gray whale field team.
Kelli Iddings sampling mysid near Port Orford.

With the influx of gray whales came an influx of new and visiting GEMM Lab members, as Florence’s team of interns joined for the summer season. I was lucky enough to join this group as the lab’s newest graduate student!

All summer 2016 GEMM Lab members.
All of the summer 2016 GEMM Lab members.

Our members have presented their work to audiences far and wide. This summer Leigh, Amanda, and Florence attended the International Marine Conservation Congress, and Amanda was awarded runner-up for the best student presentation award! Erin traveled to Malaysia for the Scientific Convention on Antarctic Research, and Rachael and Leigh presented at the International Albatross and Petrel Conference in Barcelona. With assistance from Florence and Amanda, Leigh led an offshore expedition on OSU’s research vessel R/V Oceanus to teach high school students and teachers about the marine environment.

Amanda with her award!
Amanda with her award!
Science Party musters in the dry lab for safety debrief aboard R/V Oceanus.
Science Party musters in the dry lab for safety debrief aboard R/V Oceanus.

Courtney fledged from the GEMM Lab nest before 2016 began, but the work she did while here was published in Marine Mammal Science this year. Congrats Courtney! And speaking of publications, additional congratulations to Solene for her publication in Marine Ecology Progress Series, Rachael for her four publications this year in PLOS ONE, Marine Ecology Progress Series, Marine Ornithology, and the Journal of Experimental Biology, and Leigh for her five publications this year in Polar Biology, Diversity and Distributions, Marine Ecology Progress Series, and Marine Mammal Science!

Wintertime in Newport has us tucked away indoors with our computers, cranking through analyses and writing, and dreaming about boats, islands, seabirds, and whales… Solene visited from the South Pacific this fall, and graced us with her presence and her coding expertise. It is a wonderful thing to have labmates to share ideas, frustrations, and accomplishments with.

No heat in the lab can't stop us from solving a coding problem together on a wintery evening!
Solving a coding problem together on a wintery evening.

As the year comes to a close, we have two newly-minted Masters of Science! Congratulations to Amanda and Erin on successfully defending their theses, and stay tuned for their upcoming publications!

Amanda's post-defense celebration!
Amanda’s post-defense celebration!
Erin's post-defense celebration!
Erin’s post-defense celebration!

We are looking forward to what 2017 brings for this team of marine megafauna enthusiasts. Happy holidays from the GEMM Lab!

Happy GEMM Lab members.
Happy GEMM Lab members, enjoying one another’s company and playing Evolution.

Feed from the scientific network: the digital library of a millennial student

Solène Derville, Entropie Lab, Institute of Research for Development, Nouméa, New Caledonia (Ph.D. student under the co-supervision of Dr. Leigh Torres)

If you are a follower of our blog, you may have noticed that bioinformatics and statistics hold a very important role in the everyday life of the GEMM Lab. As good-old field observations remain essential to the study of animal behaviour and ecosystems, the ecology field has greatly benefited from advances in information technologies. In fact, data analysis is now a discipline in itself, as innovative solutions must continuously be developed to cope with the challenges of ever increasing dataset size and complexity.

communications-jpg-800x600_q96Artist’s impression of a complex network. ©

So how does a poor biology student find her/his way in this digital and mathematical world? Most ecology departments will provide classes to learn the basics of statistical modelling and data analysis, but there is only so much you can learn through formal education. In practice, we ultimately always run into a problem, an exception that we have never heard of, and we have to figure it out on our own. As my initial training was in fundamental biology, self-teaching of other disciplines (statistics and bioinformatics) has taken a lot of my time as a Master’s student and now as a PhD student. This has made me feel lonely and a bit lost at times when I run into challenges that always seemed too big for me. But in the end, there is nothing more rewarding then solving problems by yourself after long hours of mind-scrambling.

Oh, sorry, did I say by myself? Nothing could be more wrong and more true at the same time! Because the place where I find all the answers to my questions, is in fact born from the contribution of thousands of scientists, which, despite not actually knowing each other, all work together to develop innovative solutions to modern world scientific challenges. The internet scientific network has been my best colleague over these past years and here I would like to share my enthusiasm for some of its best features that have helped me in my research.

If you look at my Firefox toolbar you will find two types of websites: let’s call them the “practical” and the “reflectional”.

The practical websites:

These are the websites I consult if I have a specific and practical question. Many forums exist where people exchange their experiences solving a great variety of problems. But sometimes conversations get lost in never-ending exchanges of opinions, some of which are not always scientifically well-founded. On the contrary, the StackExchange platform launched in 2009 has a strict policy on how questions should be asked (as precise and focused as possible) and should be answered (in an objective, opinion-free way). This makes it a very powerful tool to find quick and practical solutions to your everyday problems. This platform includes 136 different websites, each dedicated to a different topic. In my field, I mostly use: CrossValidated for statistical issues (e.g., Why does including latitude and longitude in a GAM account for spatial autocorrelation?) and StackOverflow for programming (e.g., plotting pie graphs on map in ggplot).

The latter will usually provide you with codes in the programming language of your choice (R, python, java, sql, etc.). Interestingly, even with more queries regarding Python to StackOverflow in 2015, R was the fastest-growing language between 2013 and 2015 on this same platform. If you haven’t decided on the language you want to “speak” yet, check out this fun infographic. But always remember that these tools keep evolving

4a9d355949d9cb77f8128dd517395405Academia can also be useful for questions regarding publications. For instance: How to reference multiple authors of a chapter from a book [APA]? Why might a journal editor reject a submission, but suggest submission to a sister journal? Or, how to best kill a manuscript as a peer reviewer?

And finally, if you’ve always wondered, “Why don’t we remove door handles and let doors open both ways (inwards, outwards)?, you’ll be pleased to know that other out-of-the-box-thinking people are sharing their opinion on the web…

Coming back to serious matters, it is important to recognize that you need the right key-word to access this gold-mine of website knowledge and sharing. The accuracy of your search answer will only be proportional to the quality of your question. In R for instance, if you keep googling “table” instead of “dataframe”, “list” instead of “vector”, or “size” instead of “dimensions”, you will likely get quickly drowned in the google-limbo. One way to be more efficient at your search strategy is to make sure you know your basics. Most of the programming languages used in ecology (e.g., R, Python, Matlab) share a similar vocabulary and structure, but before you start to run all sorts of crazy statistical analysis it is important to know what types of objects you are working with and how you want to format them. In R, I have found Hadley Wickham’s book, Advanced R, particularly useful to understand what happens back-stage.

Another good reference in the spatial ecology field is ZevRoss “Technical Tidbits From Spatial Analysis & Data Science. This website is a particularly up-to-date blog for data processing and visualization in R.

More generally, I regularly check R-bloggers or simply the Comprehensive R Archive Network. A note on the latter: I know it doesn’t look pretty and the reference manuals for R packages are rather intimidating but it is still the number one reference to check when encountering a problem with a given function. Some authors make a special effort to write more user-friendly tutorials to their packages. Check for those by looking at the CRAN page of a given package, in the “downloads” section, “vignettes” subsection (e.g., for the adehabitatLT package vignette).


 The reflectional websites:

The web is also an amazing media to reflect on our scientific practices, learn about current ecological theories, and acquire general knowledge across disciplines. In the scientific network, many blogs and forums exist where scientists can converse and debate ideas without the pressure of publication requirements. As a student trying to find my way in the great world of statistical modelling, I find these discussions and blogposts most useful to put my methodological choices in perspective and progressively build myself an opinion (still rather vague I’ll admit). Some of my most recent findings are: Dynamic Ecology Multa novit vulpes and From the bottom of the heap, the musings of a geographer. I am sure each of you has your own “rock star of the web”, so please share your favorite sites with us in the comments below.

Science not longer needs to wait for publication to be shared between peers and with the general public. The web offers us a new space to communicate, not only on that small part of our work that led to positive results, but also our negative results, frustrations and failures, which can at times be as informative and useful to the scientific community than our successes. So, wherever you stand, tell us about your ideas, and tell us about the challenges you have encountered, where you failed and where you succeeded. Because, this is what ecology is all about. Sharing knowledge across borders and cultures to understand the planet we live on and together take better care of it.