Wild Places vs. Instagram

Outside Online’s What’s Being Done to Save Wild Places From Instagram

From #hashtags to selfies to “influencers” , the desire to go to that beautiful place and get the perfect “unique” perspective and picture. We are almost all guilty. You’ve seen the likes, the followers, the shares, in whichever social media platform one uses- it’s all right there. But how are these places adapting to the booming surge in visitors? How are they keeping us safe? How is the natural and wild area doing afterwards?

Matt Wastradowski investigates the outdoor-recreation tourism boom. Telling us about places that have been forced to find innovative (and sometimes desperate) ways of adapting to and curbing the steady stream of tourists each season. Head on over and read more on this article and maybe change the way you go play in the wild?

 

 

How much do you care about YOUR mental health?

“According to the 2019 State of Mental Health in America Report, over 44 million American adults struggle with a mental health condition, and the rate of youth similarly affected is on the rise. While this a staggering number, there is some positive news for those prone to depression and anxiety. Recent studies have discovered that spending time in nature can be a powerful tool for improving overall well-being and managing mental health.

The great outdoors has plenty to offer in the form of fun and recreation, but its influence on your overall health and wellness is worth investing your free time and attention in. The returns come in the form of an overall healthier and happier life.” Find out 6 ways to improve your mental health by reading the story below.

Go Outside: Your Mental Health Depends On It

Ever Heard of OSU’s CoF Transfer Professional Program?

The application for admission to the professional program in OSU’s Forestry, Forest Engineering, and Forest Engineering-Civil Engineering programs is now available!

What is the Professional Program?

Several majors in OSU’s College of Forestry (Forestry, Forest Engineering, and Forest Engineering/Civil Engineering) have a pre/pro model.  The pre-professional courses span the freshman and sophomore years, and the professional courses (or “pro school”) span the junior and senior years.  Anyone can declare a Pre-Forestry or Pre-Forest Engineering major.  Moving to the professional program requires a special application process which is normally completed during spring of the sophomore year.  Admission to the professional program is based upon:

  • Completion of all the required pre-professional courses by September 10, 2019
  • Grades of C or higher and a minimum GPA of 2.25 or higher in all the pre-professional courses

Who Should Apply?

You should apply to the College of Forestry’s professional program if you meet ALL the following criteria:

  • You plan to transfer to OSU’s Corvallis campus for fall 2019
  • You plan to major in Forestry, Forest Engineering, or Forest Engineering-Civil Engineering
  • You will complete all the required pre-professional courses in your major by September 10, 2019.  You can consult our Transfer Guides to determine how your courses apply to the requirements.

NOTE: students are welcome to transfer to OSU at any time.  If you have not yet completed all the pre-professional courses for your major, you can still transfer to OSU as a Pre-Forestry or Pre-Forest Engineering major and complete them here.  Then you can apply to the Pro-School in a future year.

Application Process

  • Apply for transfer admission to OSU’s Corvallis campus.  Declare a major in Pre-Forestry, Pre-Forest Engineering, or Pre-Forest Engineering/Civil Engineering.  If you aren’t admitted to OSU, you won’t be able to complete the application for the College of Forestry Pro-School. Transfer applications for fall 2019 are being accepted now.  If you haven’t already applied, you should do so ASAP!
  • Once you are admitted to OSU and have an OSU ID number, you need to complete the College of Forestry’s Pro-School application.  The preferred deadline to apply for fall 2019 Pro-School admission is April 15, 2019 (11:59 pm Pacific).

FAQ’s

  • What are the required pre-professional courses for my major?

Consult the Advising Guide for your major to find the required pre-professional courses.  You may find our Transfer Guides useful as well.

  • What if I won’t have all the required pre-professional courses complete by September 10, 2019?

Students are only admitted to Pro-School if they have completed ALL the required pre-professional courses satisfactorily.  If you are missing courses, you may need to apply to Pro-School for a future year.  We encourage students to work with their academic advisor (and to contact us at forestry.proschool@oregonstate.edu ) to determine the best timeline for Pro-School application.

  • Can I apply to the professional program for a later term (e.g. winter, spring, summer)?

Students can only enter Pro-School in the fall term.  We do not admit students to Pro-School for winter/spring/summer terms.  This is due to the sequential nature of the Pro-School coursework and the need to begin those sequences in the fall.  Entry to the Pre-Forestry and Pre-Engineering majors is unrestricted, and students can begin the pre-professional courses in any term.

  • Who do I contact if I have questions?

Questions about the Pro-School application process can be sent to forestry.proschool@oregonstate.edu

  • When will I know if I’ve been admitted to Pro-School?

Admission decisions will be communicated via email (to the email address you list on your application) by May 1, 2019.

  • When does Field School start?

Field School will be Wednesday, September 11th – Tuesday, September 24th.

The Federal Government Shutdown

As we all have heard by now, the government did it’s (almost yearly thing…) shutdown. Thankfully at this time a temporary conclusion was met between officials and it is up and running again, but for how long? It was the country’s longest shutdown and thousands of federal workers were effected.  After seeing so many headlines in regards to vandalism, unemployment, debt; I came across a new perspective. Did you know…?

Wes Siler from Outside Magazine has some information in regards to it that maybe you haven’t heard about just yet. 

“The most surprising emotion I’ve encountered while reporting on the partial government shutdown? Fear. Everyone from park rangers to administrators to government lawyers to guides who operate independent businesses on federal land are all too scared to publicly go on the record about how the shutdown is impacting them. And let me tell you, that is anything but normal. “

To finish reading the article, click here: Federal Employees Living in Fear

Winter Term Has Arrived, But What About Winter?

Words from the CoF SLC:

As I sit warmly with the sun basking through the window, I am grateful that the sun shines and the skies are a glorious blue. It’s chilly outside, students are bundled up in jackets, gloves, and hats. I’ve noticed fresh buds are forming on the bushes on the Corvallis campus along Jefferson Way. Oh Spring… Then it hits me. It’s barely mid-January! Where has Winter gone? Did it arrive? Did I miss it?!

The climate has shifted out of what we have thought was our “normal”. It’s not getting as cold, not getting as wet. Not here in the valley or up to the mountains. Winter is beginning to escape us and our plants are confused, just as much as the people. The closer you get to the mountain passes, you anticipate the fresh snow around the corner, or maybe the next one, and are saddened to see the remnants of storm from over a week ago barely holding on in the shade of the trees. Where did it all go? –Written by: Destiny Pauls

The Herald and News published a brief article about Oregon’s snowpack showing that is below normal again and data shows that the state is reaching historically normal levels less often. “It’s pretty clear that the idea of what’s normal is shifting, and that we’ve just become accustomed to these bad or below average years,” said Kathie Dello, a climate scientist with Oregon State University. If you’d like to know more or read the article itself, click HERE.

Need a few helpful hints to get you back in the saddle at OSU? Here are some ways you can prepare for Winter term and beyond!

  • Check in with the Fernhopper Upcoming Events page and the Student Resources & Engagement Events & Activities page and then save the dates on your calendar!
  • Make appointments to meet with your academic advisor if needed.
  • Do you need a job or internship? Student Resources & Engagement updates the CoF Online Employment page regularly!
  • Schedule a job shadow to explore careers.
  • Follow Student Resources & Engagement on Twitter for updates and reminders!
  • Make sure you read the monthly Student Resources & Engagement email with all of the upcoming events and activities that will help you engage and connect with College of Forestry opportunities!
  • Don’t forget Student Resources & Engagement is located in 133 Snell Hall. Stop by if you have questions!

Ever Wanted to Study Abroad? Here’s Your Chance!

Applications are now open for 3 CoF faculty-led programs in incredible destinations: Chile, Borneo, and Alpine Europe!

Please attend an INFO SESSION to meet the program leaders, talk to previous participants, and get inspired! There will be two opportunities:

  • Wednesday, Nov 28, 5pm in Strand 163
  • Thursday, Nov 29, 5pm in Richardson 115

DISTANCE STUDENTS, there is an online info session discussing international opportunities on Monday, Nov 19, 5pm PST. Get details about connecting and RSVP to CoF.International@oregonstate.edu.

Mountains to the Sea: Ecosystems of Chile

Journey to Chile this Spring Break to discover a landscape that will feel at once familiar and starkly new. Connect with faculty and peers from two Chilean universities and build field skills as you trek through Chilean forests to learn about biodiversity, forest and wildlife ecology, sustainable forest management, and ecosystem services. Offered with opportunities for Spring term internships.

Spring Break 2019 | 3 undergrad credits/3 grad credits | Application Deadline January 11

Oil Palms + Orangutans: Forest Conservation in Malaysian Borneo

Dive into the complex ecological, social, economic, and political dimensions of tropical forest conservation in Malaysian Borneo. Meet with regional conservation leaders and scientists, assist in field research, and experience firsthand the efforts that work to preserve some of the world’s most remarkable forests and wildlife. Offered with opportunities for Summer term internships.

Summer 2019 | 6 undergrad credits/3 grad credits | Application Deadline February 15

Forest to Frame: Sustainable Manufacturing + Design in Alpine Europe

Visit Slovenia and northern Italy to explore the value chain of wooden products from forest through manufacturing, design, and construction. Experience cross-cultural exchange with university students from Slovenia and learn from their faculty and industry leaders. This program will include industry tours of innovative companies that focus on the manufacture and design of sustainable products made of natural materials.

Summer 2019 | 6 undergrad credits/3 grad credits | Application Deadline March 15

Find more details about these and other opportunities abroad, such as exchanges and internships at http://www.forestry.oregonstate.edu/international.

Or use the link to the Facebook event.

URSA Engage- Call for Student Applications

Have you heard about the very exciting opportunity to engage in partnerships with faculty outside of the classroom while getting paid?! The goal of URSA Engage is to provide first and second year students, and transfer students in their first year at OSU, opportunities to pursue research or a creative activity under the guidance of an OSU mentor. Students who are selected will receive an award of $750 and their faculty mentors will receive $250 to support the project. The program is available to undergraduates across all academic disciplines. Projects will take place from the middle of winter term 2019 through the end of spring term 2019 (15 weeks at 5 hrs/week).

Everything you need to know is live on the website.

There are over 120 amazing projects on our website for you to look through, including those that involve:

  • improving models for fuel combustion
  • developing Monte Carlo simulations
  • exploring overuse injuries in Division I athletes
  • producing a short documentary film on the history of the visual and literary arts at OSU
  • investigating the role of plants in shaping coastal habitats

So, now what do you do? Here are the steps:

  1. Go to the URSA Engage website and read through the faculty mentor project descriptions.
  2. RSVP and attend one of the facilitated informational/networking workshops (not required but highly recommended). Each faculty mentor project description will tell you which workshop that faculty mentor will be attending.
  3. Reach out to faculty via email and set up a meeting to discuss applying to the program.
  4. Once you find a mentor, have your faculty mentor read your final application and sign the Faculty Mentor Approval Form, which will need to be attached.
  5. Submit the program application!

****The Office of Undergraduate Research, Scholarship, & the Arts is there to help! Come to the undergraduate research drop-in advising hours if you have any questions about emailing a faculty mentor, filling out the application, etc.! (Mondays and Tuesdays from 12:00-2:00pm in Waldo 140)****

More questions? Please email pierszas@oregonstate.edu

Check out the Flyer Here!

Check Out OSU’s Diversity and Social Justice Retreats

Ready to unpack racial and ethnic identity, pursue commonality, and find new ways to replenish individual wholeness? Do you know how to recognize racism and respond to it in a healthy way? Let’s examine the historical experience of race, ethnicity, and nationality in the U.S. and learn effective ways to disrupt discrimination in daily life.

Student Affairs is dedicated to principles of equity and social justice, and as such, all of our events and programs are inclusive to all who are committed to transformative learning. We need your support advancing social justice education on our campus through immersion retreat experiences for OSU students. Currently, OSU facilitates four social justice retreats:

  • Racial Aikido
  • Multiracial Aikido
  • Examining White Identity in a Multicultural World
  • International Student Social Justice Retreat

These weekend long retreats promote campus dialogues about race and racism. Each of the retreats engage in the active exploration of the concept of race and how race influences our lived experiences and interactions. As we begin preparing for our Winter Term retreats we ask for you to look within yourself and identify if you could benefit from these opportunities.

To apply for a retreat please click Here!

Multiracial Aikido Retreat: 01/11/19 – 01/13/19

Multiracial Aikido (MRA) is founded on the principles and history of the Racial Aikido retreat.  MRA explores systems of racial oppression and centers experiences of multiracial, multiethnic, transracial, and mixed heritage individuals.

We offer a supportive learning environment for participants to unpack racial and ethnic identity through storytelling and to build a community of peers and mentors who support their growth. We hope that by the end of the retreat participants will have found commonality in their various experiences and identify tools to navigate, heal, and make meaning as racialized beings in a U.S. context.

Examining White Identity in a Multicultural World Retreat: 01/11/19 – 01/13/19

The Examining White Identity (EWI) retreat focuses on White identity development in both personal and institutional contexts, while introducing strategies to help students understand their relationships to others, and provide students the skills to help build community among diverse communities. This retreat helps students understand how notions of  race and difference  have been constructed historically, how they affect us today, and how best to interrupt discriminatory behaviors and to  develop a global mindset that is rooted in social responsibility for our shared community.

International Student Social Justice Retreat: 01/11/19 – 01/13/19

The International Student Social Justice Retreat was launched at OSU in February 2016 in the spirit of initiating dialogue on issues of diversity, ethnicity, race, and nationality in the U.S. This retreat helps participants understand the socio-historical American narrative on race and ethnicity, and provides participants with skills to manage and disrupt discrimination based on their perceived identities.

Racial Aikido Retreat: 01/25/19 – 01/27/19

Racial Aikido seeks to empower students using the principles of aikido to recognize, respond, and replenish. Originally created at the University of Vermont, Racial Aikido acknowledges that certain communities-particularly communities that have experienced historical trauma due to racism may be ill prepared to deal with issues of race and racism as it affects them personally. Racial Aikido promotes tools to maintain a positive self-image and be able to respond to overt and covert racism.

By the conclusion of the retreat, you will have a better understanding of privilege, power and positionality, in-group and internalized oppression, identity development models, and be more self-aware of your multiple identities. You’ll learn by active participation just how to recognize racism, respond to racism in a self-affirming and positive manner that is appropriate for the situation, and replenish by taking care of your needs in order to maintain a healthy physical, emotional, and spiritual self.

Please direct questions about any of these retreats to sjretreats@oregonstate.edu

We would like to receive all applications by Monday November 12, 2019.

Fall is Hiring Season for Many Government Agencies. Are you Ready?

Right now is the prime time to be applying for jobs in many different government agencies! What is holding you back? If you are already in the application process, do you feel as if you are adequately prepared? Thinking about applying down the road? Why not get ahead of the game.

Whether you are a freshman, senior, or graduate student- attending workshops, career fairs, and basically taking in as much information and assistance as you can will ultimately help you learn, network, or even get hired (now or someday). Check out a few tips to improve your odds: 9 Federal Job Search Tips That’ll Help You Land that Government Job (The Muse)

Networking is very important in getting your foot in the door. So if you can volunteer, get an internship, or take on a part-time job with a local agency, that’s a great first step! Once you’ve demonstrated your ability to succeed in a government position, you are much more marketable.

Come to one of the career fairs or events at the college with OSU staff and government employers and introduce yourself. Bring your resume and get to know the person and/or agency, then follow up after the fair. 

Register in Handshake for any of the following workshops. They are all coming up very soon!

What can you do with a forestry degree: careers, internships and volunteer positions

Are you interested in finding out what you can do with a degree in forestry? The career possibilities are numerous and there are a number of resources available to help you explore potential careers and benefits of a forestry career.

One such resource is an online guidebook that will help you explore forestry careers and internships. It’s available at FireScienceOnline, which began in 2012 to provide quality data and information for students pursuing a career in fire science. It offers tools and resources that help students and professionals make well-informed decisions about their education and training. This site offers information about a variety of careers, training and education requirements, and average salaries.  If you are interested in Fire Science, then take some time to explore FireScienceOnline.

Student Resources & Engagement also provides resources to explore some of the careers available in the fields of forestry, recreation and natural resources. Explore the Employment Opportunitiesweb pages for information about the SAF Job Fair, Job Shadow Program, career information.  Check out the Find a Job or Internship page for current job and internship listings, job search tips and resources and a directory of College of Forestry employers contacts.

Be sure to take advantage of the numerous resources available to explore careers and find temporary and permanent positions.