Topic pages provide a way to share related resources in one easy-to-find place.

Topic pages provide a great opportunity for you to:

  • Put your content where people are browsing on the OSU Extension website. In our website’s main menu, the topic-related links receive the most clicks.
  • Organize the content for your topic(s). And direct people here — the place with the most up-to-date information. Whoo-hoo!
  • Learn about other fabulous resources. By working on this, you’ll learn about resources others have created across the state related to your topic. And discover other brilliant things happening across OSU Extension in other topics or programs.

Topic pages help Oregonians:

  • Find our resources and events on topics they are interested in
  • Discover who is doing this work — you, our experts! Experts are listed at the bottom of the topic pages.
  • See where things are happening across the state. See the ‘in your community’ tab. This information is added by adding a county focus area.
  • Discover the breadth and depth of what OSU Extension does
  • Stumble into answers to questions they hadn’t yet asked

Topic pages are the foundation to make our resources easy to find. They support our organizational goal to share the breadth and depth of content from across OSU Extension in one framework (not a network of separate sites), organized around topics. To learn more, read about the Navigator: OSU Extension digital strategy initiative.

Level up your topic page

Each topic page has different needs and audiences. Below are some ideas for ways to organize your topic page.

Case study: Bees and pollinators

Kudos to the bees and pollinators content team for a well organized and engaging topic page!

Read some tips on organizing your topic pages:

Case study: Youth education resources

Kudos to the ‘youth education resources’ content team on the engaging and well organized youth education resources topic page!

It was important to make the content sortable by grade level (i.e., Elementary School, Middle School, High School). These keywords were added to the related content (articles, publications, etc.).

Now we can sort our resources by grade level. And see the list of resources under ‘Browse resources.’ To explore how this works, visit the browse resources youth education resources page.

Help improve topic pages

We need your help to make topic pages awesome.

Please:

  • Review the topics related to your expertise.
  • See if the pages looks complete or if the content is out of date.

If no one has curated a topic page, then it will automatically show any latest content tagged with that topic.

To help you quickly organize content on topic pages, connect with the Extension web team.

Training

Learn more about how to edit topic pages:

Earlier this month the Web and Content Strategy Team (WCST) finished re-setting our team priorities for 2020. 

This week I want to share a high level overview of our priorities for the rest of the calendar year. 

Improve the content authoring experience

Why is this a priority? 
A more intuitive and consistent authoring environment will make it easier and faster to add and edit content.

Benefits: 

  • Easier to add and edit content
  • Reduce user confusion and anxiety
  • Encourage more Extension employees to use the system
  • Decrease training and support time 

One-on-one design help for county landing pages 

Why is this a priority? 
A strong web presence at the county level is a leadership priority, and helps promote your local programming and activities.

Benefits: 

  • One-on-one with a web designer will improve page design and accessibility
  • Provides an open forum to get your website questions answered
  • Creates a consistent look and feel between counties making it easier for audience to find local programming and activities
  • Helps the WCST understand what your goals and needs are

Analytics, user research, metrics related to content strategy

Why is this a priority? 

Helps content teams make data-informed decisions by focusing on content that meets the needs of audiences.

Benefits: 

  • Helps content authors to identify gaps in content
  • Provides content teams insight into what site users are looking for
  • Highlights what content is successful and what needs improvement

Integration of CMS and CRM for Digital Engagement

Why is this a priority? 

This is the start of component 3 of Extension’s Digital Strategy. Initial focus will be on delivery of e-newsletters.

Benefits: 

  • More efficient management of subscriber lists
  • Ability to measure click-through rate, conversions, etc
  • Increase enrollments in workshops and courses
  • See Mark Kindred’s excellent blog post from June 23rd for more information

 


Have you heard of the WayBackMachine? It is one of the many resources from the Internet Archive. The Internet Archive is a non-profit library of millions of free books, movies, software, music, websites, and more. The WayBackMachine has a collection of 446 billion web pages. Want to know what the Lane County website looked like in 2003? Go to https://web.archive.org/ and enter a URL, and browse through the timeline select date. 

The Extension website has come a long way over the years. Here are some screenshots from the Extension website over the years.

OSU Extension homepage
(circa 2002)


This is an example of old school hand-coded HTML, uploaded via FTP designed for 800x600 px. screens.
90 years of the OSU Extension Service

OSU Extension homepage
(circa 2003)



Designed for 15" 1024x768 px. screens
OSU Extension homepage circa 2003

OSU Extension homepage
(circa 2006)



This design incorporated Macromedia Contribute which featured a visual (WYSIWYG) editor. Eliminated need to write HTML or use a FTP program.
OSU Extension homepage circa 2006

OSU Extension homepage
(circa 2013)



Built using Drupal 6. A move in the right direction, but mostly used as a content delivery platform.
Extension homepage circa 2013

OSU Extension homepage
(circa 2020)



We are now using Drupal 8 and fully utilizing the power of the CMS with structured content.

OSU Extension homepage 2020

 

 

 
During these times, we make the most with what we have. And sometimes we can do more with what is at our fingertips. In one-on-one web meetings or when auditing webpages now two years after launch, it’s clear that many of the helpful features of the website’s content management system are still new to you.

When things are new, they may be avoided or underused. So, explaining how these work more than once and in different ways helps. We have done a written web guide, blog posts and trainings. Some quick tips below will hopefully show you things you may have missed.

How do I make a page more designed or organized?

It can be hard to connect what you see on the back-end (where you edit pages) with what you see after you save it. Page sections are the way to layout your content and make information standout for a visitor on the webpage – whether it is a topic, county or program page.

Below is an excerpted video from a recent webinar. It switches back and forth to help you see: what each page section looks likes in edit mode and what it looks like once saved.

Click to play the video on page sections

As the video shows, page sections allow you to add pieces of content to a page in chunks, one section at a time.

There are different types of sections you can use to customize your page:

  • Standard: For typing in static text and for adding images or videos. These don’t fully use the content management system, since they aren’t shareable across the site.
  • Automated: For automatically displaying lists of events, program resources, or latest content. Once set up, you don’t need to do anything more. The content updates based on tagging or dates.
  • Selected: For finding content that others added on the website, and selecting it so it displays in a specific place. You need to remove it later if you no longer want it to show.
  • Designed: For setting up a page so content stands out (e.g. an orange stylized bar with icons to click). Also, it can make content formatted a specific way (e.g. content titles show and when you click the full text expands).

Not all page sections or advanced settings are covered in this video, so also read more in the web guide.

How do I stop an event or announcement from showing up?

You can now modify tags! This makes it easy to fix a piece of content that was mistagged. You can also add your county tag, topic tag or program tag to something to get it to show up. This can be useful for an online event that may be of interest to your audiences.

This short video shows you how to modify tags (click to play).

What’s happened to my content or page?

Sometimes you notice something has changed or isn’t how you remembered it. First, take a deep breath and realize two things: there’s an easy way to find out and it’s usually a simple explanation.

We are in this together. You each have a lot of access to do things you need to on the website, and that means many other people do too. It’s what makes this website platform function with the resources we have. Communication and a sense of calm can help most situations.

The easy way to find out what’s happened is to look at the “Revisions” tab at the top of any page.

The revisions page records who made the last changes, and you can compare to see what changes were made. It’s even better when everyone remembers to leave comments in the “revision log” field when editing a page. Those comments appear in the Revisions tab too.

If nothing looks out of the ordinary there, then send a quick email to https://beav.es/extension-support to ask us to look into it.

If it’s a technical issue, then we will get on it. If it’s a training issue, we can offer context to help understand the way the content management system or different team processes work.

What’s the benefits of the website’s content management system?

This efficient system has prepared us for the long term goals of integrating Extension content with other sites, social media, and client relationship management platforms. It will also be able to personalize content for visitors on the website. This is why the content is structured and tagged in the way it is.

Being in the same content management system helps to:

  • Show a more unified presence of Extension and the coordinated efforts within each of our programs, fields of expertise and regions
  • Track analytics and feedback for a more strategic approach
  • Avoid duplication of resources and use the tagging and page sections to share and show one piece of content in many places.

We are continually improving this behind-the-scenes editing experience.  We are working to simplify the way content authors add, find, select, translate and manage content. Stay tuned for more news and trainings later in the year. In the meantime, reach out to us now for a 1-on-1 working session to get up to speed on all that you can do.

UPDATED 7/17/2020.

We have added a new focus area template to each county. Here you can share information on accessing food, health care, and financial assistance in your county.

Please change the information in the template to the relevant resources for your county. Then publish it. See details on how to make the updates below.

Screenshot of the focus area template:


To find your local focus area:

  • Login to the OSU Extension website
  • Visit your county landing page
  • In the sidebar towards the bottom, click the orange button “Return to group content list.”
  • Under the heading “manage content” — find “type” and select “local focus area.”
  • Click “apply.”
  • Look for “[count name] COVID-19 resources.”
  • Click edit

To customize your local focus area:

  • Review the information
  • Delete any information that isn’t relevant for your county
  • Add local contacts for the remaining relevant information (name and contact info for your local health department, etc.). Update the text within the brackets: “[[ ]]”
  • Publish the focus area

Display it on your county landing page:

  • Visit the “What we do” page on your county’s landing page
  • Under “Highlights” click “[Reorder Focus Areas]”
  • To change the order, click and drag the arrow icons in front of the focus area names to the desired location. The first five focus areas will show up on the county landing page.
Lately, people have been wondering how to share their recent Zoom recordings and handouts, and how to let communities know we’re still providing useful activities and resources. The website can play a part in this communication, alongside your emails, social media, newsletters and outreach to local media. We have some guidelines and examples and considerations to get you started and coordinated related to: Prepping recordings, Program pages, County pages.

County pages

The county landing page already is a spot to feature your current events, your newsletter and feature a few new pieces of content either from your county or statewide news and resources. You can also use announcements to share resources like Lincoln county.

This action of keeping your landing page fresh shows you are active. Featuring a couple pieces of new content could be done at the same time you are pulling together your newsletter.

If you have a lot of new resources, then keep your focus areas under “What we do” updated too. In addition to announcements, Lincoln county added a new focus area to encourage supporting local food, for example.

We’ve also had requests from other regions that they want one place to showcase all that’s happening across their program areas. In this case, an “Online resources and activities” focus area can be featured at the top of your What We Do section on your homepage.

Here’s an example that we will push out to counties later this week, which you can customize.

We want to elevate visibility and awareness of OSU Extension’s work with Oregon communities with particular focus on local and county-level impact and resilience in the face of COVID-19. Next week we’ll share another focus area template to help you in directing people on where to find local food, health and financial assistance too.

Program pages

Other than the event lists, program subpages are a good place to communicate with participants and volunteers in your program what new resources you have that they can do at home. The key is coordinating how these resources are added, although the design on the page can vary.

Here’s a short decision tree.

  1. Is the new resource only relevant to your local program in your county?
    1. Yes, add as a program resource to your local program group.
    2. No, see below.
  2. Is the new resource of interest to or being duplicated by other local programs in other counties?
    1. Yes, add as a statewide program resources and tag for the local county programs. This way it only needs to be updated in one place.
    2. 4-H Jackson county is an example that could be done this way since they have good resources that could be of interest to other 4-H county programs that are also adding new home activities subpages.
  3. Is the new resource of interest to other statewide programs and the general public?
    1. Work with related faculty to add through a content team as an educational material and tag for the program(s). This way it can show up on topic pages too.
    2. Oregon Master Naturalist is an example that shifted to this way.

Prepping and sharing your recordings

Content teams have shifted to giving virtual programming since the pandemic started. When giving your programming as a scheduled webinar, the recordings are posted in OSU MediaSpace within hours. You can use this recording in several ways, but there’s a few things you need to do first.

Make sure that you have informed attendees it is being recording and received the needed permissions from those attending. Please remember that recording meetings or events with youth is prohibited without express consent from their parent or guardians. See specifics on the Virtual Extension program delivery page.

To ensure we meet our ADA responsibility, please request captions for your Kaltura video, and proof and fix any issues. This will ensure the recorded content is as widely accessible as possible.

  • You may need to edit your Kaltura video to snip the beginning or end of your recording. You can find instructions here.
  • Check in if you have any branding for pre and post-production to be added.
  • Lastly you will need to share your video.

Once you have completed these steps, you can post the video on the website.

  1. Add the recording link to the event page (which can still be found by searching on the website after the event) along with any handouts. However, don’t share publicly “meetings”, especially that contain youth in the recording, on the website. See program delivery info on Zoom safety and security on our Virtual Extension website.
  2. Get the attendee list from your Zoom Oregon State report dashboard afterward and email it to them. Contact us for any questions on getting that list.
  3. Add the video on the related county focus area if the content is a webinar not meant for broader distribution (check with the appropriate content team first). See a Coos county example.
  4. See if faculty want to edit portions of the webinar to add as educational content through their content team. Visitors to the site often want quick answers not whole webinars when they find videos on the site.

You still want people to attend the program, rather than just wait to find the recording. The value of people attending the webinar live is that they can engage with you and other participants – a chance to ask questions and network. However, analytics on numbers of views of the recordings could be included in your Digital Measures reporting.

Web updates

It is important for our learners, stakeholders and funders to know that OSU Extension continues to actively serve, engage, respond and innovate during the COVID-19 pandemic—even while locations are closed and employees are working remotely.

To align with the current way we deliver services, we adjusted small but meaningful wording on the site:

  • We adjusted the emergency announcement from emphasizing we are closed to we are still here for you with related resources.
  • We made it clearer on the homepage how we are offering many online events from across the state.
  • We made sure that postponed events are now separate from active events.
  • We shared information on wearing a face covering on county sites.
  • We feature new resources on the homepage and COVID-19 topic page, like the new “Sewing cloth face coverings for beginners” educational gallery.

We also improved the speed at which you can enter and update content behind-the-scenes.

Oregon Master Naturalist is an excellent example of a statewide program using the website layout. Kudos to Jason O’Brien!

Let’s take a look:

These are some of the things we love

The landing page has:

  • A lush and inviting photo
  • Engaging information about the program.
  • Titles and text are user-friendly and help potential participants identify if they would enjoy and benefit from the program.
  • An enthusiastic testimonial video
  • Stories sharing the heart of Oregon Master Naturalist
  • Straight-forward sidebar navigation

Other pages

Become a Master Naturalist

Volunteer

  • Great impact statistics for Master Naturalist volunteers. These were added using the new “impact stats bar,” available for programs and counties.
  • Easy to find exciting volunteer project ideas

What is the cost?

  • Easy to understand the cost and financial options.

What you can do now

Review your program pages. Is there anything you can do to improve the text or images based on the example above? See instructions for updating program content.

Please contact us with any questions.


Web updates

These are some new features:

  • You can tag an event with a project. Then add a “project events list” to your page to display them.
  • You can add a “project faculty/staff list.” Contact us to add users to display on a project.
  • You can override the title of a piece of content selected for a “highlighted content item” page section.
  • You can now specify what text shows when county event lists have no events to show.

The about us section on the website has new information, including a new career opportunities page.

 

The Linn County ‘Forestry and Natural Resources’ focus area is a great example of a county focus area. These are some of the things we love:

What you can do now

Review your focus areas pages. Is there anything you can do to improve the text or images based on the example above?

See: How to create a focus area.

Website updates

Updated functionality for timezones. For example, in Malheur County the currently open/closed information displays correctly in real-time. It also displays MST/MDT next to office hours and events as appropriate.

UPDATED 11/26/19: The new OSU Extension website homepage has been launched! Check it out, we’d love to hear what you think! Share your feedback.


A new design for the OSU Extension website homepage will be launching soon!

Updates include:

  • New feature to sharing three key statistics. (This will also be available to content groups for program subpages and collections.)
  • New footer for the OSU Extension website. This is the black section at the bottom of all pages on the OSU Extension website. This is viewable now.
  • Easy ways to find information for local county offices, including a direct links to each county’s event page.
  • A new design for homepage featured content. This will highlight awesome content across OSU Extension.
  • Added Ask an Expert featured questions.

Keep an eye on the homepage over the coming days to see the updates.

 

Come see us at OSU Extension Annual Conference!

As you plan what sessions you’ll attend, consider these:

 

Extension Website Lightning Talks
Jennifer Alexander, Mark Kindred, Amerie Lommen, Bryan Mayjor, Michele Scheib
Wednesday, 9:15-10:00am

The Extension website is more powerful than many realize. In this session, we will present short lightning talks on tips and tricks for using the Extension website and related tools, reporting impact (including Digital Measures), best practices and requirements for web content (including accessibility for visitors with disabilities), and news about upcoming milestones in Extension’s digital strategy, including CRM development.

 

DIY Extension Marketing
Ann Marie Murphy, Nicole Strong (TBC), Michele Scheib, Erik Simmons (TBC), Chris Branam, Kym Pokorny
Tuesday, 1:30-2:45pm

Creating awareness of the value of Extension and recruiting participants and volunteers is often top of mind and can be a challenge for Extension offices and programs. This session will bring tools, ideas and experience to help you market Extension in your county and region from a variety of people and perspectives. Come prepared to share one of the most effective 2019 marketing efforts from your county or program!

 

Building a CRM Practice in Extension Programs: the How & the Why
Mark Kindred, Carrie Berger
Wednesday, 10:15-10:45am

The Extension Service is scaling up its use of CRM (Customer Relationship Management) software as a digital tool to increase efficiency and strengthen productivity. For each program across Extension, the scope and scale of a CRM practice will differ. This presentation will highlight the steps undertaken to assess, plan, and implement a CRM practice using Salesforce. Learn what worked, what didn’t, and why this digital solution was necessary for helping the program achieve its goals.

 

Extension Efficiency and Growth Opportunities
Jamie Davis (TBD), Amerie Lommen, Mark Kindred, Jeff Sherman, Kelsey Knight, Kevin Leahy, Raul Burriel
Thursday, 1:00-2:00pm

Join us for a panel that will help foster ideas for social resilience and growth mindset, intergenerational marketing, community engagement, sustainable growth, keeping up meeting and event attendance within the community, reaching the next generation, and more! The panel will feature: Jamie Davis (Social Media), Amerie Lommen (EESC/Web Strategy), Mark Kindred (CRM), Jeff Sherman (non-traditional community engagement models), Kevin Leahy (holding meaningful meetings; getting community to attend Extension events), Raul Burriel (tech/media strategy)

 

Internet Productivity Tips & Tricks: Getting the Most Out of Your Web Browser and Online Search
Victor Villegas
Wednesday, 10:15-10:45am

Learn how to get the most out of your web browser, increase your productivity and find information faster online.

 

Information table at the conference

We will have a table on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday. Come find us and ask questions. We’d love to see you!

 

We have some wonderful program pages to share with you. These are great examples of how you can lay out your content for program participants, volunteers, and other people who are involved with or interested in your program. Here’s initial feedback we’ve been hearing from all of you about the updated design features:

  • “The sample webpage looks great!  I love the ease of navigation and how well it showcases 4-H.”
  •  “Love the ‘new’ website layout!….Really like the ‘call to action’ addition!”
  • “The overall appearance is very aesthetically pleasing….The design helps with visually de-bulking the content.”
  •  “This looks great! I appreciate that you’ve simplified & condensed the menu.”
  •  “[It] will really help to showcase the work of the volunteers locally, so thank you!”

Master Gardener local programs

  • Polk (western region example)
  • Lincoln (coastal region example)
  • Josephine (southern region example)
  • Umatilla (eastern region example)
  • Wasco (central region example)

Check these out too:

4-H local programs

These pages also turned out well:

More local 4-H examples will be coming soon.

Statewide Program

About the examples

The above examples were created through a partnership between EESC and these groups. A 4-H and Master Gardener local program was selected from each region. They were selected because they had a lot of wonderful content added to their pages, which gave us a great starting point.

Tips and recommendations for program pages

Think about how your current content will best fit into this style.

  • Do you need to craft a more concise program description?
  • You can use nested subpages to make the menu not so long and help users find the content they are looking for. Do you need to create nested subpages so the side menu is shorter?

Training materials

Getting help and sharing feedback

We can walk you through how to create this look when you’re ready. Send us questions, training requests or your feedback on the designs!

Thank you

A shout out to Alisha Atha, Holly Burton, Rose Clarke, Shevon Hatcher, Renée Johnson, Samara Rufener, Sara Runkel and Michelle Sager for partnering with us to create the examples programs listed above. We greatly appreciate the content you added to the website before we got started—and your feedback and suggestions along the way! Thank you!


Website updates

  • Your profile pages on the OSU Extension website will automatically display some Digital Measures information. This includes the awards and presentations you’ve added to Digital Measures. To turn off the display of one or all of your publications and awards on your Extension profile, log into Digital Measures and go to the Activity menu. Click on Awards and Honors and/or Publications and Intellectual Contributions, and change the sharing option to “no”. This updates every 12 hours.
  • EESC added a food safety and preservation hotline “call to action” to the OSU Extension homepage; let us know if you want the topic page announcement tagged to show on your county page.