The Extension website’s analytics are powered by the Google Analytics platform. One powerful feature of Google Analytics is the ability for administrators to configure tracking of visitor actions (called “events”) that are more complex than simple page views. These include actions performed by visitors such as clicking a link or submitting a form. In this post we will cover the actions that are tracked on the Extension website and how to access data about them.

Actions tracked on the Extension website

The following are the categories of actions that are tracked on the Extension website:

  • Content CTA: A visitor clicks on the “call to action” (CTA) link at the end of a piece of content. This CTA can be customized for articles, otherwise it defaults to links to the landing pages for the topics the content is tagged with.
    • During August, 8,116 of these events occurred
  • Downloads: A visitor clicks on a link to download a file (e.g. a PDF or Excel document).
    • During August, 25,402 of these events occurred
  • Feedback: A user selects “Yes” or “No” in a “Was this page helpful?” form.
    • During August, 3,056 of these events occurred
  • Mails: A user clicks on a linked email address to send an email.
    • During August, 1,229 of these events occurred
  • Outbound links: A user clicks on a link that directs them to an external website (i.e. a website that doesn’t start with extension.oregonstate.edu). This includes clicks on the “Share” button on pages that visitors can use to share the link to social media.
    • During August, 135,661 of these events occurred
  • Search: A user performs a search using the site search function that doesn’t return any results.
    • During August, 479 of these events occurred

Note that a single action by a visitor might be counted for more than one category. For example, if a call to action at the end of an article links to the Extension Catalog website, that will be included in both the “Content CTA” and “Outbound links” categories.

Note about tracking document downloads

Note that Google Analytics can only track clicks to the document that happen on the Extension website. This means that if you email someone the link to a document, post it on social media, etc. Google Analytics will not track those clicks. If tracking these numbers is important, we recommend:

  • Converting the document to a web page
  • Storing the file in OSU Box, which tracks downloads from everywhere. To see this information, log in to Box and view the file. On the right-hand side of the screen, there is an icon to open the “Details” panel for the file. Here, you can see the number of times the file has been previewed and downloaded.
  • Creating a shortened beav.es link for the document that you share. Then you can log back in and see how many people have followed that link.

Accessing data about visitor actions

Content authors can access some data about visitor actions through the on-site analytics dashboard.

  • Downloads: in the lower-right corner of the “Top Content” section, follow the “Search Document Data” link. This will take you to a report of all events in the Downloads category. You can use the filter at the top to find data for a specific document.
  • Searches: follow the “See analytics for all of Extension” link in the top-right corner of the dashboard. In the “What visitors look for” section (last on the page), you will see data for terms that visitors have entered in the search box on the site.

To get data for the other action categories at this time, you will need access to the full Google Analytics back end. Submit a website support ticket to request access. We have created basic instructions for using the full Google Analytics back end. You can also see our recent professional development webinar to learn how your colleagues use analytics.

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2 thoughts on “Analyzing website visitor actions in analytics  

  1. This is great, Amerie! Can you show me how to see results from UTM codes I have used on social?

  2. This is a great recap of how richer info is tracked on the Extension website than merely a page view! I am eager to see more content teams dig into fine-grain details like this to uncover how we collaboratively make a better n’ better experience for people on the site!

    Also, a quick +1 from me on what Janet is mentioning regarding UTM tracking codes. If that technique becomes trendy, Extension would do itself a big favor in simply organizing which tracking code wording ends up being used (which can lead to confusing duplication). Perhaps a good blog post topic?!?

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