The Web and Content Strategy team is committed to website accessibility. Accessibility means that content is available to and used by a diverse variety of visitors. This refers to making a site useable for people with physical and situational disabilities. But, it can also apply to others, including:

  • People using small screens on mobile devices
  • English-language learners and automatic translators used by non-English speakers
  • People of diverse ages
  • Non-human visitors to the site, such as search engine crawlers

As an institution that receives federal funding, we are legally required to make content and services accessible.

Many accessibility features are built-in to Drupal platform. We promote accessibility best practices in our workshops and training materials. But what about people who speak a non-English language?

The Office of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion recently added a document translation service. The TRANSPORT translations portal is a tool you can use to submit documents for translation, or to get a price quote to help with your program planning. This tool is available to all Extension employees.

Non-english speakers in Oregon
Source: https://datausa.io/profile/geo/oregon#languages

In 2018, the most common non-English language spoken in Oregon was Spanish. 9.36% of the population of Oregon are native Spanish speakers.

Website analytics over the past year show that the percentage of users who have their browser language set to Spanish, 0.16%.  This is a sign that the Extension website is not meeting the needs for the majority of Spanish language speakers.

We are in the process of adding Spanish language translation capabilities to the Extension website.

This is an ambitious project and will be developed in 3 phases over the year.

Phase 1: Manual individual page translation

  • Over the next few months the web team will be configuring a set of multilingual modules to enable translations. Once this is in place, you’ll be able to add an Español translation to your content.
  • If a page is available in another language, users will be able to switch from English to Español by clicking the Español tab.

Phase 2: Google Translate integration

  • When a new version of an English page is saved, the system will make a call to Google Translate to create a  Spanish translation. Translations will have a moderation process, so only reviewed translations will be available to the public

Phase 3: Fully translated website

  • All content, tags, topics and menus translated

Extension & Experiment Station Communications (EESC) has some history with multilingual websites. Back in 2014, the EESC publications team produced two spiral bound, pocket-sized “flip books” for Christmas tree management. Each book has a side written in English and when you flip it over, you have the same content in Spanish. The authors were also interested mobile version for workers in the field. Using the multilingual capabilities in Drupal, we recreated each book in both English and Spanish. Users switch between English and Español by clicking a button. These are a fully translated websites, where there is a matching page for each language.

Below are some screenshots of the flip books showing both the  English and Español versions.

Mobile phone:

Mobile side-by-side comparisons

Desktop browser:

preview of EM 9093 website

preview of PNW 659 website

Website updates

  • “Languages spoken” field was added to user profiles for listing other languages that you speak.
  • An “impact stats” section that shows as an orange bar across the page has been added for program pages. You can see an example of this on the Extension homepage.
  • Added a new “podcast” content type for sharing podcasts. For more information see the Podcast chapter on the Extension Website User Guide.
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