In this week’s issue:

Nancy Kershaw Retiring

Nancy Kershaw is retiring after 34 years of service. Her reception will be Friday, December 14, 12:00-2:30 in Tillamook. Plan to attend and wish her well.

Communication and connection opportunities

Is there anything about which you are interested, curious, or concerned? Here are some ways to share and ask:

  • Online form to submit questions (Think of this like a virtual comment box.)
  • OSU Extension Slack workspace or informal communication and collaboration
  • Read ConnEXTions weekly, and contribute!
  • O&E blog with First Monday videos (Engage via the comment section!)
  • Outreach & Engagement Quarterly Conversations (Next: February 15, 2019)

Branding

Marketing Templates, Tools, and Inspiration – Extension-specific templates for flyers and presentations (including 4-H), ready-to-use marketing collateral, and examples of well-branded pieces just got easier to find. A link to the Box folder now is found under Popular Links on the Extension Employee Intranet site. If you have something you’d like to share for others to use as inspiration, send files to Ann Marie Murphy. Our library of templates and inspiration will build over time.

Extension Messaging“Writing with Your Audience in Mind” was a presentation at the Extension Annual Conference led by University Marketing’s Senior Editor Gary Dulude. He shared his presentation—and notes—to help us communicate in a way that resonates with our target audiences. One attendee said it was the most helpful writing workshop she’s ever attended!

Navigating OSU Brand Resources – Branding resources are found in two places: the online OSU brand guidelines and the Extension Employee Intranet site, which includes the Extension sub-brand style guide, logos, templates, and more. “Navigating OSU Brand Resources” helps you locate brand-related information. Download it and keep it handy as a reference tool.

OSU Extension Out There video: Next steps

The Leadership Forum session at last week’s annual conference wrapped up with the inaugural showing of a 90-second video featuring Extension’s work across Oregon. This video, created in partnership with the OSU Productions team, is the latest in OSU’s OUT THERE video series.

The video uses vignettes to convey the range of programming and geographic scope of Extension’s work in Oregon and to reflect our pride in that work. The video has story arcs that show resilient and productive ecosystems, food systems, youth outreach, healthy living, and economic development and career training.

Audience feedback about the video rightfully pointed out that the video fell short on representing the remarkable diversity of faculty, clients, and volunteers that are doing the work of Extension in our communities. As a consequence, many in the audience did not feel the video was welcoming or representative.

We will be working with the video team to re-edit the video to better showcase the diverse participants who participated in filming. We will also explore capturing additional footage to authentically reflect our workforce.

When complete, the Extension OUT THERE video can be used in whole and in smaller segments to help elevate awareness of Extension in the minds of Oregonians. Perhaps more importantly, it should be a video that all of us feel part of and proud to share.

If you have thoughts or questions about the video, please contact marketing manager Ann Murphy  or EESC director Jennifer Alexander .

Extension Web Update

We gave a sneak-peak of the new county landing page (homepage) design at the Extension Annual Conference. Curious? Check out the annotated designs for the new look and feel that will be available in early January.

Diversity Highlights

Please contact analu.fonseca@oregonstate.edu with any questions or comments or if you have suggestions for events or news stories to include in Diversity Highlights.

Winter Term 2019 Course:
QS 262: Introduction to Queer Studies [Options for E-Campus]
QS 321: Queer Pop Culture: Instructor Michael Floyd E-Campus.
QS 362: Serving LGBTQ+ Communities: Instructor Michael Floyd, Wednesdays from 4:00 pm to 6:50 pm.

Find more courses in the course catalog: https://classes.oregonstate.edu/

Events & Resources

Fiesta Cultural: Bilingual Storytime [Spanish and English]: The Lane Art Council’s bilingual storytime is a great way to celebrate our community’s language diversity and participate in a cultural exchange. December 15 from 11:00 am to 12:00 pm in Springfield, for more information visit the event page.

PDX Civic Forum: The Impact of Incarceration: Join in on January 31st  from 4:00 pm to 5:30 pm as the Portland Leadership Foundation unravel the issues regarding incarceration in Oregon. December 31 in Portland, for more information visit the event page.

Creating Equitable & Culturally Inclusive Environment: Join Jane Waite (SJEI) for critical inquiry: Why do students experience the same classes differently? How does who we are impact the ways we teach and learn?  What constitutes an equitable environment? January 15 from 10:00 am to 12:00 pm in Corvallis, for more information visit the event page.

In the News

They Wonder What Happens When A Hollywood Blockbuster Features Two Black Leads. A North Korean Hack Helped Them Find the Answer.

It’s no secret that Hollywood has a dismal record of hiring non-white actors for prominent roles. In the past 25 years, just 11 percent of non-white actors have been nominated for Academy Awards, according to Time magazine.

Sybrina Fulton, mother of Trayvon Martin, to speak at Oregon State

Sybrina Fulton, the mother of Trayvon Martin, will speak Jan. 21, 2019, at Oregon State University as part of the university’s Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration.

Champinefu Lecture Series Finale

Doug Duer, a cultural anthropologist, and David Harrelson, the Manager of the Grand Ronde Cultural Resources Department will be discussing “Ethnobotany of the Kalapuya” as part of the series’ greater effort towards increasing awareness about Kalapuya culture and its relationship with land management.

What are you reading?

Please share an interesting book, blog, or article you’ve read lately. What’s one insight you gleaned?

Extension in the news

No, Oregon Christmas Tree Farmers Are Not Growing Cannabis Instead
Willamette Week
While the image of jolly Oregon farmers abandoning firs for cannabis Christmas trees feels on-brand in Portland, Chal Landgren, a Christmas tree specialist with Oregon State University, says that’s not what’s happening around the state.

Molalla 4-H alumna performs special duties at national event
Molalla Pioneer
4-H alumna Lauren Urton recently returned from the 4-H National Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony in Washington D.C. where she was selected to perform a unique musical rendition using American Sign Language.

Hamm marks final Farm Fair with talk of spuds, the future
East Oregonian
Phil Hamm’s presentation, “What I Would Do to Manage Diseases if I was a Potato Grower,” was his last as an Oregon State University employee. The longtime plant pathologist and professor will retire in summer of 2019 after a nearly 30-year career with the college, and a nearly 45-year career studying plant diseases.

In this week’s issue:

Nancy Kershaw retiring

Nancy Kershaw is retiring after 34 years of service. Her reception will be Friday, December 14, 12:00-2:30 in Tillamook. Plan to attend and wish her well.

Larry Lutcher gets Distinguished Service Award

Larry Lutcher, agronomist with Oregon State University and Morrow County Extension, received the Distinguished Service Award from the Oregon Wheat Growers League at the annual Tri-State Conference this past week in Portland. This was to honor all of Larry’s dedicated work and expertise to crop development in the county. Larry is pictured with Oregon State Wheat Grower President, Brent Cheyne.

Extension Web Update

Visit the conference sessions this week and ask questions.

Diversity Highlights

Please contact analu.fonseca@oregonstate.edu with any questions or comments or if you have suggestions for events or news stories to include in Diversity Highlights.

Note:

For more Diveristy, Equity and Inclusion event across Oregon, visit our event calendar page.

Events & Resources

Examining White Identity: Participant Application : Faculty facilitators of the EWI in a Multicultural World retreat facilitate similar curriculum for faculty and staff at Oregon State University. Administered as a workshop through the Social Justice Education Initiative (SJEI), EWI for faculty and staff provides a focused learning opportunity to explore issues of power, privilege, and oppression related to white identity.  Dates are from 01/11/19 – 01/13/19, for more information and or updates check out the website.

The Second Gathering: Her Story: Join us for an evening of celebrating our stories through food, conversation and writing. December 9 from 6:00pm to 8:00 in Portland. For more informtaion visit the event page.

Equity Innovation Lab: Transformational Women: This powerful program advances female leadership using physical challenges and encouragement to takeselves and their leadership seriously to counteract the impacts of sexism. December 12 from 8:00 am to 5:30 pm in Portland, for more information visit the event page.

Raising Respectful Kids in a Diverse World: Part 2: Join in a conversation to improve parentsand adults’ skills to address these harms with kids early on in their development. December 16 from 11:00 am to 2:00 pm in Eugene. Fore more information visit the event page.

Alsea Tribal Life at Cape Perpetua Prior to European Contact: Learn about the pre-European inhabitants of Cape Perpetua from one of Cape Per-petua’s exceptional volunteers, Dick Mason. December 23 from 1:00pm to 2:00 pm in Lincoln, for more info visit the event page.

In the News

Fourth National Climate Assessment- Chapter 15: Tribes and Indigenous Peoples

“Indigenous peoples in the United States are diverse and distinct political and cultural groups and populations. Though they may be affected by climate change in ways that are similar to others in the United States, Indigenous peoples can also be affected uniquely and disproportionately.”

Studies Provide Further Proof that African American Students Benefit from Having Black Teachers

“African American students who have even just one or two black teachers in elementary school are significantly more likely to enroll in college, according to a new study conducted by researchers at Johns Hopkins University and American University.”

Pacific Northwest History and Cultures: Why Do the Foods We Eat Matter?

This online lesson provides perspectives from Native American community members, images, objects, and other sources to help students and teachers understand the important connections between foods and cultures for Native People of the Pacific Northwest

Molalla 4-H alumna performs special duties at national event

Each state has the opportunity to nominate one current or college-aged 4-H member to perform at the national ceremony every year. It is a great honor to be nominated, according Wendy Hein, 4-H Youth Development faculty with the Oregon State University Extension Service in Clackamas County.

We Have Work To Do

As a slogan, “We Have Work To Do” evokes images of a campus rolling up its sleeves and getting down to business. That is exactly what the Office of Institutional Diversity intends with its new campaign, which takes a look at where Oregon State University stands on its path to create a more inclusive community.

New Campaign Aims to End the Problematic Way Physical Differences Are Shown in Movies
It’s common for movies to make a villain look “evil.” Unfortunately, this is often done through facial differences like scars or burns. A new campaign,  “I am not your villain,” is a call for people in the film industry “to stop using scars, burns or marks as shorthand for villainy.”

In this week’s issue:

Communication and connection opportunities

Is there anything about which you are interested, curious, or concerned? Here are some ways to share and ask:

  • Online form to submit questions (Think of this like a virtual comment box.)
  • OSU Extension Slack workspace or informal communication and collaboration
  • Read ConnEXTions weekly, and contribute!
  • O&E blog with First Monday videos (Engage via the comment section!)
  • Outreach & Engagement Quarterly Conversations (Next: February 15, 2019)

Quarterly conversation

The November Quarterly Conversation is now available for viewing. If you would like to take a closer look, the slides are available for download. Topics of the conversation included the launch of the Director’s Coin recognition program, leadership update by Scott Reed and Lindsey Shirley, including information about PACE and the Outdoor Economy initiative, and presentations by Western Regional Director Rich Riggs and University Omsbuds Sue Theiss.

Extension Web Update

Sometimes you just want to see how something is done rather than reading about it. This week we share new instructional videos for those working behind the scenes on the Extension website. These will show you the basics you need to know – from adding an event, to improving the way a photo displays, or to linking to another web page or resource. More videos will be coming out next month.

Diversity Highlights

Please contact analu.fonseca@oregonstate.edu with any questions or comments or if you have suggestions for events or news stories to include in Diversity Highlights.

Conversation Starter- Video:

Ellen Pompeo Calls Out Lack Of Diversity On Interview Set

After Ellen Pompeo called out the lack of diversity on the set of a “Net-A-Porter” interview with Gabrielle Union, Gina Rodriguez, and Emma Roberts, Carlos Bustamante and Graeme O’Neil react on “ET Canada Live”.

Events & Resources

TEDxBend Women: TEDxBendWomen is a local opportunity for exclusive viewing of the LIVE speakers and performers taking place at TED Women this year, celebrate how dynamic and diverse people are showing up to face challenges head-on, all while empowering each other to shape the future we all want to see. December 1 from 9:00 am to 2:00 pm in Redmond, for more information visit the event page.

Beyond Invitation: How Do We Create Inclusive Communities? Having a statement at the end of a job announcement to encourage communities of color, queer people, and women to apply can be a start, but how do policies, environment, and culture support this invitation? Find out on December 3 from 6:00 pm to 8:00 pm in Portland, for more information visit the event page.

Children’s Rights, Human Rights: A Multicultural Celebration “Children’s Rights, Human Rights: A Multicultural Celebration of Our Future” is a celebration honoring the 70th anniversary of the United Nations adopting the “Universal Declaration of Human Rights.” December 9 from 3:00-6:00 pm in Eugene, for more info visit the event page.

Alsea Tribal Life at Cape Perpetua Prior to European Contact: Learn about the pre-European inhabitants of Cape Perpetua from one of Cape Per-petua’s exceptional volunteers, Dick Mason. December 23 from 1:00pm to 2:00 pm in Lincoln, for more info visit the event page.

In the News

Rewriting the Old Disability Script

We changed queer literature, and the world, by writing our own stories. With disability, we can do it again.

Tribes Create Their Own Food Laws to Stop USDA From Killing Native Food Economies

From blue corn to bison, narrow federal food-safety codes impact tribal food systems. But advocates are writing their own food laws to preserve Native food sovereignty.

Teaching kids about Thanksgiving or Columbus? They deserve the real story

In the season four premiere of ABC’s hit sitcom “Black-ish,” Dre, a charismatic dad played by Anthony Anderson, is distraught over his children’s performance in a school play about Christopher Columbus.

Fighting Racism: Oregon organizations receive a two-year environmental justice grant

“The organization I lead, Beyond Toxics, along with the Eugene-Springfield NAACP and Medford-based Unete Farm Worker Advocacy Center, were awarded a two-year $90,000 grant. We are three diverse, now united, Oregon nonprofits dedicated to solving racial injustice.”

Black Migrants: Photographs of California’s Forgotten Agricultural Past

Photographer Ernest Lowe documented the lives of Black farmworkers in California’s Central Valley in the 1960s, then revisited the region in 2015 to reconnect with his subjects. The resulting photographs are now on display.

What are you reading?

Please share an interesting book, blog, or article you’ve read lately. What’s one insight you gleaned?

Extension in the news

Schreder named new Wallowa County Extension Agent
Wallowa County Chieftain
Schreder has several projects in southern Oregon he will be finishing before going full-time in Wallowa County. However, even when he is in Lake County he will be available to Wallowa County residents, the spokesman said.

Punches replaces Oester as area’s OSU forester
Wallowa County Chieftain
“I have always been an outdoors person. and one of the great passions of my life is being around growing things,” said John Punches, who became the OSU Extension Forester for Wallowa, Union and Umatilla counties July 1.

It may be harder to find the perfect Christmas tree
The Associated Press
“Supply and demand seem to always be in some flux,” Chal Landgren, a Christmas tree specialist and professor at Oregon State University, said via email.

In this week’s issue:

Extension Messaging Workshop Recap

Extension has hundreds of great stories to tell about the impactful work we’re doing in our communities. The messaging workshop with Ologie on November 14, helps us fine-tune how we tell our stories and create captivating headlines. View a recording the Extension workshop here.

Ologie gave us some great tips:

  1. Include a brief description of Extension in everything we write (including workshop and event promotional materials), such as this 140-character description: OSU Extension provides information and expertise to help meet local challenges and help every Oregonian thrive.
  2. Create headlines using the most interesting nugget of information — rather than the program or workshop name — and add emotion to capture attention and make an impression. The Outdoor School advertisement is a good example of a good headline (see photo) according to Ologie. To help find the nugget that will make for an intriguing headline, ask yourself:
    • What is the impact?
    • What is being done that couldn’t be done before?
    • Why are you passionate about the research, event, program, etc.?
    • Why are you doing it?
  3. Focus on the benefits. It will be helpful to revisit the Extension message map on pages 6 to 9 in the Extension Style Guide, which you can find on the Employee Intranet website.

To learn more about the Extension sub-brand and messaging, sessions are being presented at Extension Annual Conference. If you have brand-related questions, please contact Ann Marie Murphy, marketing manager for Extension.

Inaugural Director’s Coin for Excellence Awarded to Beatriz Botello, Kim Tarrant

Beatriz Botello, SNAP-Ed Education program assistant in Lincoln County, and Kim Tarrant, assistant to associate provost, were awarded the first Director’s Coin for Excellence at the Outreach and Engagement Quarterly Conversation on Nov. 16.

The Director’s Coin for Excellence is presented to Extension personnel, partners, collaborators, community members, and others who have displayed excellence in support of the Outreach and Engagement and Extension missions or have distinguished themselves in an exemplary manner.

Beatriz was recognized for her innovative suggestion that Oregon State University provide a means for which visibly communicates that are employees are multilingual. Upon receiving that suggestion, University Marketing and Relations developed pins inscribed in languages found throughout Oregon. This will allow community members who don’t speak English as a first language to feel more comfortable when approaching our Extension professionals, making outreach efforts more effective and resulting in our ability to better serve all of our residents.

Kim was recognized for her leadership in coordination of the conceptualization, development and implementation of the Director’s Coin of Excellence. Through the process Kim kept the team on track and synchronized efforts to make the concept a reality. Her commitment to the successful implementation of this strategic initiative will contribute significantly to and positively impact the well-being and morale of Extension faculty and staff, as well as our partners.

Recognizing excellence significantly enhances morale and esprit de corps within organizations, acknowledges critical contributions to mission, and inspires others to serve in innovative and selfless ways.

Excellence in service and achievement can come in a variety of forms. Examples include, but aren’t limited to:

  • Extraordinary efforts, above and beyond what would normally be expected
  • Suggesting or developing innovative or creating ways to improve process, products, or operations
  • Outstanding achievement which contributes to the efficiency or economy of operations
  • Exemplary service as an acknowledgement of a job well-done, usually over an extended period of time
  • Outstanding displays of the human spirit

Any employee in the Division of Outreach and Engagement can nominate an individual for a Director’s Coin. The brief nomination statement will contain at a minimum:

  • Name and affiliation of the individual being nominated
  • Nomination statement including the action of the individual nominated and the impact of the action on the OSU or Extension mission
  • Proposed date and location of presentation

A well-worded nomination statement is critical as the nomination statement will become the wording used for the citation. Please be concise as we are using a 100-word limit.

The web form for nomination can be found at on the OSU Extension employees page under forms at: https://employee.extension.oregonstate.edu/forms/directors-coin-nomination

Virtual Park Ranger gets awards

The Virtual Park Ranger team from Oregon State University earned two awards at eXtension’s Impact Collaborative Summit in Indianapolis in October.

At the end of the three-day Summit, teams participated in a “PitchFest” where they each presented the advancements on their projects and the important next steps and investments needed to move forward. The PitchFest was judged by external partners/investors, Extension leaders, and peer co-creators.

The Virtual Park Ranger team earned two awards: most innovative – external, and crowdfunding. These awards have earned the team recognition within the Cooperative Extension System nationally, a trip to the 2019 Impact Collaborative Summit, and strategic support from Lynn Luckow of LikeMinded.org to position their project for crowdfunding on the platform in the coming months.

The team included Alan Dennis and Stephen Ward, both in Extension and Experiment Station Communications; and Siew Sun Wong, associate professor in the Family and Community Health program. Their project reconnects people with nature through an augmented reality app that stimulates improvements in personal wellness and environmental stewardship.

Extension Web Update

If you serve Oregonians interested to get involved as participants or volunteers in Extension programs, you will have additional ways to draw attention to the opportunities offered. A new look to program pages are coming soon that allow you to add background photos or shading, quick links, calls to action, and program descriptions to highlight select activities and resources. Take a look and let us know what you think.

Diversity Highlights

Please contact analu.fonseca@oregonstate.edu with any questions or comments or if you have suggestions for events or news stories to include in Diversity Highlights.

Conversation Starter- Video:

How to get serious about diversity and inclusion in the workplace

Imagine a workplace where people of all colors and races are able to climb every rung of the corporate ladder — and where the lessons we learn about diversity at work actually transform the things we do, think and say outside the office. How do we get there? In this candid talk, inclusion advocate Janet Stovall shares a three-part action plan for creating workplaces where people feel safe and expected to be their unassimilated, authentic selves.

Events & Resources

Art & Power: Centering the Voices of Native Artists: How are Native artists reclaiming space and building community in Portland? Join the Art & Power of 2018 as we listen, learn, and reflect with Portland-based artists. Nov. 21 from 6:00pm to 8:00pm in Portland, for more information visit the event page.

Native American Awareness Gathering: Join Salem-Keizer Public Schools and learn more about our Native American and indigenous populations in this free family event on Nov. 30, 2018 from 6:00pm to 9:00pm in Salem, for more information visit the event page.

Alsea Tribal Life at Cape Perpetua Prior to European Contact: Learn about the pre-European inhabitants of Cape Perpetua from one of Cape Perpetua’s exceptional volunteers, Dick Mason. November 25th from 1:00pm to 2:00 pm in Lincoln City, for more info visti the event page.

History Pub – Notable Women of Portland: The story of Portland, Oregon, like much of history, has usually been told with a focus on male leaders. This presentation offers a reframing of Portland’s history– including information on 10,000 years of Native American women, pioneer women, women of the Progressive Era, WWI, WWII, and post-war women, with additional tales of women in the arts and women in politics. November 26th from 7:00pm to 9:00pm in Portland, for more information visit the event page.

In the News

30,000 Oregon kids in first year of statewide Outdoor School

Three-quarters of Oregon’s eligible fifth- and sixth-grade students participated in the inaugural year of the statewide Outdoor School program, according to a new Oregon State University Extension Service report.

Adidas letter exposes racial tensions

Shortly after he was named president last spring, Zion Armstrong said Adidas North America was committed to building a truly diverse workforce.

The Creative Way One Family Is Diversifying Bookshelves Across The Country

Troubled by the lack of diversity in children’s books and the literacy gap involving kids around the country, a mom and her two kids have set out to send 50 diverse children’s books to each of the 50 states.

OSU celebrates Native American Heritage Month

November marks Native American Heritage Month, a celebration of American Indian and Alaskan Native tradition, history and culture, and the Native American Longhouse Eena Haws will be holding events throughout.

What are you reading?

Please share an interesting book, blog, or article you’ve read lately. What’s one insight you gleaned?

Extension in the news

Students Connect with School Nutrition Professionals
Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council
Many of the recipes used for this workshop are from Food Hero (www.foodhero.org), an online resource with shopping hints, cooking tips and videos, to help Oregonians improve their health with affordable and healthy recipes.

Dairy Goat Day welcomes all goat farmers, enthusiasts
Creswell Chronicle
“It made sense to combine our efforts,” Melisa Fery, OSU Small Farmers Extension Program agent, said. “(The program) is all about community education and helping landowners or small acreage owners meet their goals.”

Conspiracists Blame California Fires on Airborne Laser Guns
The Daily Beast
Daniel Leavell, a forest agent and assistant professor at Oregon State University, told The Daily Beast that fires are driven by a variety of complicated factors, including wind, that can produce surprising burn patterns.

Hazelnut yields fall short of expectations
Capital Press
Nik Wiman, orchard specialist for Oregon State University, said growers with dryland hazelnut orchards should consider adding drip irrigation if they can.

How to counteract dog urine spots, when to overseed lawns? Ask an expert
The Oregonian/OregonLive
Leaves are falling fast and winter approaches, but there are always gardening questions. Get answers from Ask an Expert, an online question-and-answer tool from Oregon State University’s Extension Service.

In this week’s issue:

New! Model Release Forms in Spanish

University Relations and Marketing has uploaded the OSU Model Release form in Spanish. Find English and Spanish, short forms and long (group) forms on the download page.

Thank you to Glenda Hyde for asking the question many of you may have: She wondered why we don’t include the Extension non-discrimination statement on these model releases.

To paraphrase our Office of General Counsel,

  1. This is an OSU form and not an Extension form. Though, of course, OSU is committed to non-discrimination, it is part of overarching policies and practices and does not legally need to be listed.
  2. This form is about the person giving US permission to use their photo, not us providing a service.
  3. Though it’s not illegal to include the statement, generally the more words on a contract, the more hesitant a person is to sign it.

New Course offers help for online courses

To help educators facilitate a better digital learning experience for students, the College of Education created a convenient and thoughtfully-designed program that focuses on the new field of learning experience design (LX Design).

The Learning Experience Design Certificate starts January 7, 2019 and it’s designed for current educators looking to move their courses online, as well as anyone who is already invested in e-learning and is looking to hone their skills.

You can read more about the Learning Experience Design Certificate here.

Extension Web Update

Join the web team at the Extension Annual Conference on Tuesday, December 4 at 2:15  for our session “Ask the Experts about the New Extension website” in Corvallis. The whole web team will be on hand to listen and walk through your questions.

Diversity Highlights

Please contact analu.fonseca@oregonstate.edu with any questions or comments or if you have suggestions for events or news stories to include in Diversity Highlights.

Video of the Week:

Is This Doctor Racist??? | Diversity in Healthcare | Wednesday Checkup | Doctor Mike

Welcome to a new episode of Wednesday Checkup and today we are covering the recent viral video from Twitter. Many people are accusing the doctor in the video of racism and discrimination.

Events & Resources

Dandiya Night 2018: Dandiya is a traditional Indian dance that is originated from Gujarat, India, you won’t want to miss out on this opportunity to dance to upbeat Indian music. November 16 from 7:00pm to 10:00 pm in Corvallis, for more info visit the event page.

Alsea Tribal Life at Cape Perpetua Prior to European Contact: Learn about the pre-European inhabitants of Cape Perpetua from one of Cape Perpetua’s exceptional volunteers, Dick Mason. November 25 from 1:00pm to 2:00 pm in Lincoln, for more info visit the event page.

History Pub – Notable Women of Portland: The story of Portland, Oregon, like much of history, has usually been told with a focus on male leaders. This presentation offers a reframing of Portland’s history– including information on 10,000 years of Native American women, pioneer women, women of the Progressive Era, WWI, WWII, and post-war women, with additional tales of women in the arts and women in politics. November 26 from 7:00pm to 9:00pm in Portland, for more information visit the event page.

In the News

OSU-Cascades is younger, more diverse due to largest-ever first-year class 

Oregon State University-­Cascades’ current first-year and transfer student populations are officially the young university’s largest to date, and the former group is making the campus both younger and more diverse. (see also KTVZ)

Congress will have more Latino members than ever before

More Latinos will serve in Congress next year than ever before — at least 42, with one House race to be decided.

First Native American women elected to Congress: Sharice Davids and Deb Haaland

Democrats Sharice Davids and Deb Haaland will become the first Native American women elected to Congress, CNN has projected.

Mark Lakeman helps tackle the housing crisis with creativity, compassion

America is short some 7 million affordable apartments for those living in poverty, according to the National Low Income Housing Coalition’s 2018 report. With conventional approaches falling behind the pace, artists and visionaries are stepping up to the plate, creating paradigm-busting solutions that challenge traditional ideas of housing.

Most Decorated Unit In U.S. History Fought For A Country That Didn’t Accept Them

The 442nd Regimental Combat Team was made up of Japanese-Americans, many of whom served when their families were imprisoned behind barbed wire.

Lines for Life launches new military helpline for veterans struggling with mental health

More than a dozen veterans die of suicide every day, according to the Veterans Association. It’s a problem a local non-profit is trying to fix.

What are you reading?

Please share an interesting book, blog, or article you’ve read lately. What’s one insight you gleaned?

Extension in the news

New Spray Film for Grapes Cuts Water Need
Wines & Vines
Those strategies focused on managing supply, but work by Clive Kaiser, an extension horticulturist with the Umatilla County Extension Service and Oregon State University professor attached to the Oregon Wine Research Institute is looking at things from the vine’s point of view.

Dairy Goat Day challenges beginners, experts
Capital Press
“It made sense to combine our efforts,” Melisa Fery, OSU Small Farms Extension Program agent, said. “(The program) is all about community education and helping landowners or small acreage owners meet their goals.”

Why I’m in: Helping our community deal with tough health-related issues
Tillamook Headlight Herald
“Why I’m in” interview with Dusti (Jessica) Linnell, Oregon State University, Family and Community Health.

In this week’s issue:

Communication and connection opportunities

Is there anything about which you are interested, curious, or concerned? Here are some ways to share and ask:

  • Online form to submit questions (Think of this like a virtual comment box.)
  • OSU Extension Slack workspace or informal communication and collaboration
  • Read ConnEXTions weekly, and contribute!
  • O&E blog with First Monday videos (Engage via the comment section!)
  • Outreach & Engagement Quarterly Conversations (Next: November 16, 2018)

Alberta B. Johnston Awards – Nomination deadline extended to Nov 13

Extension Administration has extended the deadline and updated the requirements for nominations for two Alberta B. Johnston awards.  Nominations are due by November 13, end of day, with submission by email to Jackie.Russell@oregonstate.edu.  For updated nomination criteria and instructions see online links below. Awards are received at the Extension Annual Conference Faculty & Staff Awards program.

Alberta Johnston Award for Excellence in Extension Education

Award: The recipient will receive a $1,000 check and plaque awarded at the Extension Annual Conference Faculty & Staff Awards program.

Eligibility: Nominees must be currently employed as an Extension faculty, specialist, or educational program assistant.

Alberta Johnston Award for Extension Leadership

Award: The recipient will receive a $1,000 check and plaque awarded at the Extension Annual Conference Faculty & Staff Awards program.

Eligibility: Nominees must have been an administrator or providing educational leadership (or a combination of the two) for at least three consecutive years in the OSU Extension Service. Eligible positions include, but are not limited to, faculty, specialist, program leader, unit leader, department head, administration, assistant/associate director, or director.

Extension Web Update

If you are new to working on the Extension website, or need a refresher, then read “Back to the Basics – 10 Tips to Remember for Web Entry” to get answers to frequently asked questions and avoid common missteps when still learning the new website structure.

Diversity Highlights

Please contact analu.fonseca@oregonstate.edu with any questions or comments or if you have suggestions for events or news stories to include in Diversity Highlights.

Special Announcement:

Claudia Torres has been named Executive Director for Casa Latinos Unidos, a Latino non-profit organization which serves the Latinx community in the Corvallis-Benton County area. Claudia comes to Casa Latinos Unidos with vast experiences in public relations, marketing, event management, sales and community engagement. She is a community builder who, based upon previous experiences, is a well-organized, efficient communicator and well known in Oregon for her abilities to engage parents, students, and local agencies in serving the Latinx community.

Events & Resources

Columbia River Indian Autumn Gathering: Join the gathering to share and celebrate with all of our neighbors the bounty of the Columbia River Gorge. November 10 from 9:00 am to 5:00 am in The Dalles. For more info visit the event page.

The Race in America Series Presents: You Are Enough – Join in for a discussion about the experiences surrounding the one drop rule, blood quantum, and anti-blackness/anti-indigenousness in America with Dr. Allison Davis-White Eyes. November 15 from 5:00pm to 7:00pm in Corvallis, for more info visit the event page.

Confederated Tribes of Siletz: 41st Annual Restoration Pow-wow: The Confederate Tribes of Siletz Indians of Oregon invites you to celebrate with them at their 41st Annual Restoration Pow-wow held at the Chinook Winds Casino Resort. November 17 from 6:00pm to 9:00 pm in Lincoln City, for more info visit the event page.

3rd Annual History Dinner – Confederated Tribes of Coos, Lower Umpua and Siuslaw: Join for a rich, historical presentation of Native American Life on Coos Waterways at this year’s 3rd Annual History Dinner! November 17 from 5:00pm to 8:00pm in Lakeside, for more info visit the event page.

Day of the Dead Exhibit: Each year, Four Rivers Cultural Center celebrates the Day of the Dead with a family event and fiesta and a temporary altar that remains on display for the first two weeks of November. We welcome everyone to come and take a look at the beautifully created altars of local families. From November 2 to the 15 in Ontario, for more info visit the event page.

In the News

Oregon Outdoor School releases informational flyers in 8 languages, including braille.
For more information or to request copies, please contact Rita.Bauer@oregonstate.edu or visit the Outdoor School website: https://extension.oregonstate.edu/outdoor-school

Looking Forward,  Looking Past

These photos and captions are part of our Emerging Journalists, Community Stories fellowship project, which is funded in large part by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the Pulitzer Prizes. Emilly Prado is one of three journalists who are working on stories as part of this project. This excerpt is from Prado’s story about undocumented and mixed-status families living in Oregon.

Trailer parks face rising rents. This one’s residents found a way out

Not all parks are suited for coop conversions, says Kate MacTavish, a professor of human development and family sciences at Oregon State University. Oregon is one of several states that give residents the right to buy their communities, which creates an opening for ROC USA and its affiliates to work.

Latino Enrollment Shrank Where Police Worked With Federal Immigration Authorities

Thousands of students were uprooted from schools over the last decade in communities where local police partnered with ICE on immigration enforcement, a Stanford study found.

Drag culture provides a chance to speak out

Rainbow Continuum put on the Fall Drag Show at the LaSells Stewart Center. Drag is the adoption of clothing and roles of another gender for the purposes of play, entertainment or eroticism.

Native American Heritage Month: A celebration of resilience

The rich and diverse cultures, traditions and history of Native Americans are reflected in the many UO offerings for Native American Heritage Month.

What are you reading?

Please share an interesting book, blog, or article you’ve read lately. What’s one insight you gleaned?

Extension in the news

We ‘crunched at once’
Klamath Falls Herald and News
“We hope this event sparked conversation for youth and their families about the important role farmers have in providing healthy food for our schools,” said organizer Patty Case, associate professor at OSU Extension Family and Community Health.

Class Of 2025: More Money + More Days = More Impact At Outdoor School
OPB
Oregon State University’s extension service, which manages the Outdoor School program statewide, said schools have applied for money to cover more than 42,000 students. That’s up from about 30,000 students a year ago.

Oregon’s Pinot profusion
Good Fruit Grower
“We need more research, but people have been convinced that they can increase yields without lowering quality,” said Patty Skinkis, OSU associate professor and viticulture extension specialist. “It’s all in thinking about the capacity of a particular vineyard site.”

In this week’s issue:

Communication and connection opportunities

Is there anything about which you are interested, curious, or concerned? Here are some ways to share and ask:

  • Online form to submit questions (Think of this like a virtual comment box.)
  • OSU Extension Slack workspace or informal communication and collaboration
  • Read ConnEXTions weekly, and contribute!
  • O&E blog with First Monday videos (Engage via the comment section!)
  • Outreach & Engagement Quarterly Conversations (Next: November 16, 2018)

OSU Women’s Giving Circle now accepting grant proposals

OSU Women’s Giving Circle is accepting proposals for grants to be awarded in May 2019. The applications are due by Monday, January 14 at 9 a.m. To apply for a grant, please visit www.osufoundation.org/wgc_grant. Questions contact Molly Moriarty Russell at 541-737-4044 or Molly.MoriartyRussell@osufoundation.org.

Extension Web Update

New improvements to events, search, and navigation are shared in this week’s web upgrade blog post. Also, check out a new video and instructional guide on how to display and organize content that appears on the Extension website’s topic menu pages. If you have any other needs or questions, please feel free to contact the web support team.

Diversity Highlights

Please contact analu.fonseca@oregonstate.edu with any questions or comments or if you have suggestions for events or news stories to include in Diversity Highlights.

Events & Resources

MUNBINIKAN? Stories From Mali & U.S.: Stories from a workshop series led by Malian Baba Wague Diakite, artist and founder of Ko-Falen Cultural. November 3 from 11:00am to 12:30pm in Tillamook, for more information visit the event page.

Feed The Movement, Workout for Hunger: Workout for hunger is just that, a workout to build awareness of childhood hunger. This event will feature four different types of workouts: Cardio Dance, High Fitness, Pound and Energy Explosion.  November  from 5:30pm to 8:00pm in Salem, for more information visit the event page.

Confederated Tribes of Siletz: 41st Annual Restoration Pow-wow: The Confederate Tribes of Siletz Indians of Oregon Inivtes you to celebrate with them at their 41st Annual Restoration Pow-wow held at the Chinook Winds Casino Resort. November 17 from 6:00pm to 9:00 pm in Lincoln City, for more info visit the event page.

In the News

OSU supports transgender community members

Recently, the New York Times has reported that a U.S. Department of Health and Human Services memo proposes restricting the definition of gender as a “biological, immutable condition determined by genitalia at birth.” This is very concerning. In addition, yesterday the U.S. Department of Justice argued before the U.S. Supreme Court that businesses could discriminate against workers based on their gender identity without violating federal law.

OSU celebrates Queer History Month

Queer History Month is nationally recognized in the month of October, and the OSU community will mark this month with a series of events devoted to growth and celebration.

OHSU Transgender Health Program strongly refutes discriminatory statements by national leaders

The OHSU Transgender Health Program, a program of the Partnership Project, stands in solidarity with transgender communities in opposition to any suggestion that gender is an unchangeable binary construct.

Not just a feel-good step: Businesses are increasingly hiring people with disabilities, and it’s helping the bottom line

When Glynis Harvey and Mark Cagley opened Hidden Manna Cafe four years ago, the couple did not set out to hire people with disabilities. But then a social service agency asked: Might the Matteson restaurant employ a woman with cerebral palsy? How about a man with mild blindness? A customer asked for an application for her sister, who has an intellectual disability.

What are you reading?

Please share an interesting book, blog, or article you’ve read lately. What’s one insight you gleaned?

Extension in the news

Onion quality ‘excellent’ as harvest crosses finish line
Capital Press
Recent rain and frost likely did not reduce onion quality or yield, said Oregon State University Extension Malheur County Crop Agent Stuart Reitz.
OSU Extension’s poultry specialist sees 31 years of change
Capital Press
When James Hermes came to Oregon State University’s poultry department 31 years ago, big company buyouts, cage-free egg production and stringent antibiotic restrictions were not issues. Today, as enters his last full academic year as Oregon State University Extension’s poultry specialist, Hermes is dealing with all three.

Local partnership sends surplus potatoes to food banks
Capital Press
In the past, the spuds would have gone to waste, tilled over after they served their purpose as a test plot at the Hermiston Agricultural Research & Extension Center. But four years ago the experiment station decided to start partnering with local producers and the nonprofit Farmers Ending Hunger to put them to good use in food boxes for families in need.

Findley says sage grouse impact local decisions
The Argus Observer
Sergio Arispe, Oregon State University Extension Agent, said he has been working on a project to help develop mapping of ecosystems and sage grouse habitat which will allow people to develop rangeland management plans and objectives.

In this week’s issue:

Lincoln County practices tsunami evacuation

As part of the Oregon great shake out on Thursday Lincoln County Extension personnel not only dropped and covered for 60 seconds but then also practiced their tsunami evacuation route. They grabbed their go bags provided by the Red Cross and marched up the hill to complete the drill. A good example for the coastal communities to be ready to grab and go quickly.

Extension Web Update

This ambitious website project may just be getting underway in the broader timeline of the digital strategy goals, but a lot of effort has already been invested. Thank you to those leading the way and working behind the scenes through the iterative process. All of Extension faculty and staff that have the opportunity to help shape it further. This week’s web upgrade blog post looks at how to get onboard, be informed, and be recognized as part of what Extension offers going forward.

Diversity Highlights

Please contact analu.fonseca@oregonstate.edu with any questions or comments or if you have suggestions for events or news stories to include in Diversity Highlights.

Readings:

Using a Translational Process to Apply Latino Youth Development Research Findings in Practice

Translating research into practice is a cornerstone for Extension programs. We developed an intentional and collaborative translational process for converting evidence-based knowledge from Latino youth development literature into Extension practice. https://joe.org/joe/2018october/iw3.php?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=2018october

OSU Juntos – Open Campus as an Honorable Mention

Honorable mentions are programs that have made a significant impact on Latino students at your institution and within your communities. https://www.edexcelencia.org/2018-What-Works-for-Latino-Student-Success-in-Higher-Education

Events & Resources

A Journey To Africa 2018: Join the African Students Association at OSU in the Memorial Union Multipurpose room for a free night of food, games, music, information, and more! Enjoy a night of learning amazing things about the second largest continent in the world, Africa! November 16 from 5:00pm to 7:00 pm in Corvallis, for more info visit the event page.

Day of the Dead Exhibit: Celebrate with the community in Ontario on Oct. 27th, Saturday from 4:30 – 9 PM. We’ll have beautifully created altars by local families, family activities and crafts, folkloric dancing, mariachis, a DJ, and a baile that will be held outside in the garden. For more info visit the event page.

Día de los muertos: A great time and learning experience for all ages, and pan de muerto and hot chocolate will be provided. October 29 starting at 6:00 pm in Albany. For more info, visit the event page.

AKAP Korean Culture Night: Join AKAP for a fun and engaging evening with catered food from Kim Jong Grillin’ food truck (special menu offered), enjoy the performance by the Oregon Korean Performing Arts dancers, raffle drawing for exciting prizes and activities for all ages. October 27 from 5:00pm to 9:00pm in Portland, for more information visit the event page.

In the News

Black feminist speaker series began at the UO Oct. 19

The Department of Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies is hosting a new speaker series, New Directions in Black Feminist Studies, this year at the University of Oregon.

2019 Best Public Elementary Schools in Oregon

When Election Day lands on Nov. 6, Oregon voters will no doubt put education — meaning, public schools funding, the ability of the state to generate top-notch students and overall teacher and institution quality — toward the top of their issues list.

What Latinos look like: Latin American students share their stories

“to celebrate the end of Latin American Heritage month, I decided to shed light on this diversity and speak to UP students from different Latino backgrounds — some born in Latin America, others first or second-generation Latinos in the U.S.”

Building a Diverse Workforce for Next-Generation Analytics and AI

High-performance computing (HPC) has a well-known diversity problem, and groups such as Women in HPC are working to address it.

What are you reading?

Please share an interesting book, blog, or article you’ve read lately. What’s one insight you gleaned?

Extension in the news

Ag director hears farmers’ concerns
The Mail Tribune
She began her day meeting with scientists and project leaders at the Southern Oregon Research & Extension Center, and with state Sen. Alan DeBoer. Bee projects, small farm programs, grapes and cannabis were discussed by the extension staff.

Building strong leaders
Herald and News
The students started the day with Ian McGregor, a livestock extension agent with OSU KBREC … McGregor answered questions about careers and the work being done to improve the agriculture industry, listening and giving advice as students told him some of their career interests, which ranged from engineering, marketing and human resources to insurance, contract farming and real estate.

Flight of aphids clogs Pendleton air
East Oregonian
Thompson assists the irrigated agriculture entomology program at the Oregon State University Extension Service in Hermiston. He said the bugs in Pendleton are a type of woolly aphid that takes to the air each fall.

In this week’s issue:

Short Term Fellowships with AOC

Oregon Extension educators are invited to consider a short-term fellowship AOC Fellow Priority Projects Oregon Extension educators are invited to consider a short-term fellowship in cooperation with the Association of Oregon Counties (AOC). This pilot program AOC Fellow Pilot place an Extension professional within the AOC County Solutions office to work on important community issues. The term of a fellowship is flexible based upon the issue and availability of qualified individuals. Extension leadership will work with anyone interested to define the best course, including study leave, sabbatical or short-term  transfer of assignment. Please consider this unique opportunity to learn more about our AOC partner and contribute to an important issue If interested, email Scott Reed and “cc” Jackie Russell and your supervisor with “AOC Fellow” in the subject line, and information about which priority project interests you, why, any conditions associated with your availability by November 1 end of day.

Deadline reminder: OSU Extension Professional Development Fund

Next Application Deadline — November 1, 2018
The next quarterly deadline for Extension Professional Development Funds is November 1st. Applications that will be considered must be submitted BEFORE the deadline and BEFORE the professional development opportunity.

Communication and connection opportunities

Is there anything about which you are interested, curious, or concerned? Here are some ways to share and ask:

  • Online form to submit questions (Think of this like a virtual comment box.)
  • OSU Extension Slack workspace or informal communication and collaboration
  • Read ConnEXTions weekly, and contribute!
  • O&E blog with First Monday videos (Engage via the comment section!)
  • Outreach & Engagement Quarterly Conversations (Next: November 16, 2018)

National Epsilon Sigma Phi Conference

Several Oregon ESP Members attended the National Epsilon Sigma Phi Conference in Manhatten, KS, October 1-4 to receive the following national awards:
Excellence in Early Career Service: Katie Ahern
Excellence in Mid-Career Service: Jenny Rudolph
Continue Excellence: Patricia Dawson

Administrative Leadership: Sam Angima
Visionary Leadership: Willie Riggs
Excellence in Diversity Multicultural Programming: Patricia Dawson.

Bob & Charlee Moore of Bob’s Red Mill were presented the National Friend of Extension Award.

Oregon’s members were featured in several concurrent sessions. Jan Williams, Wendy Hein, Trisha Applebee presented a concurrent session on “Continuing Education for Volunteers Using eXtension”. Sam Angima presented, “Innovative Approaches to Programming Under Reduced State and Federal Funding”. “Building Capacity with a Wellness Committee to Enhance Health Outcomes” was presented by Katie Ahern. And Mike Knutz and Kelli Watcherson presented “Building Rapport with Elected Officials”.

Extension Web Update

This week’s web upgrade blog post provides answers to guide you in knowing whether or not research content should go on the Extension website and next steps based on that decision. It also provides a Box link to backed-up archive content and a recorded webinar for combined stations.

Diversity Highlights

Please contact analu.fonseca@oregonstate.edu with any questions or comments or if you have suggestions for events or news stories to include in Diversity Highlights.

Events & Resources

3rd Annual History Dinner: Join the Tenmile Lakes Association for a rich, historical presentation of Native American Life on Coos Waterways at this year’s 3rd Annual History Dinner! October 17 from 5:00 pm to 8:00pm in Lakeside, for more info visit the event page.

Culture and Conversation – Is History Repeating Itself? Portland State University School of Social Work is bringing you another installment of our Culture and Conversation Series. This event, Culture and Conversation: Is History Repeating Itself? Facilitating injustice during internment, will be held in ARSC 6th, rooms 620/630 on October 19 from 5:30pm to 7:30pm, for more information visit the event page.

Pakistani Night 2018: Pakistan Student Association presents the first Pakistani Night at Oregon State University starring the sensational Qawwals: “Fanna-Fi-Allah” October 21 from 6:30 t0 10:00 in Corvallis, for more info visit the event page.

Día de Muertos Celebration: Face Painting, Aztec Dancers live performance, kids crafts and activities, live music, food and drink in Newberg. November 2 from 5:00 pm to 8:00pm, for more information, visit the event page.

In the News

Corvallis Multicultural Literacy Center to open in new home 

OSU paid to move the center to its new quarters. The university also remodeled the building to help it fit the center’s programs. Counting parking permits and parking credits, the university spent more than $200,000 to relocate the center, which will continue to be charged $1 per month in rent.

Oregon Schools Face Long, Uphill Road To More Diverse Teaching Force

If you’re inclined to grade Oregon schools for making progress, these numbers might be encouraging: Public schools are adding non-white and multilingual teachers almost four times as fast as they’re hiring monolingual, white teachers, according to numbers in the recent Oregon Educator Equity Report.

Longstanding Equity Issues At Clark College Alienate Staff, Students

School records and dozens of interviews with staff and students show a culture at Clark College that alienates people of color, even as top school officials say the campus is becoming more inclusive.

Pride celebration commemorates diversity and inclusion

The LGBT community and supporters celebrated diversity and inclusion at the 2018 Rogue Valley Pride Celebration today, hosted by the Lotus Rising Project. Honoring this year’s theme of “Rising With Pride,” people of all sexual orientations joined together in a parade through downtown Ashland.

What are you reading?

Please share an interesting book, blog, or article you’ve read lately. What’s one insight you gleaned?

Extension in the news

Cannon Beach Has A Rabbit Problem
OPB
Eradication or hutching are both reasonable solutions, said Dana Sanchez, a wildlife specialist with the Oregon State University Extension Service. The rabbits may seem like pets to some neighbors, she said, but they are considered feral.

The Search Is On For Every Bee Species In Oregon
OPB
To fulfill that mandate, Kincaid’s department teamed up with the Oregon State University Extension Service and the Oregon Department of Forestry in 2017 to create the Oregon Bee Project.

Study shows value of fungicides for hazelnuts
Western Farmer-Stockman
“Although we have a lot of new hazelnut acres (almost 40,000) of EFB-resistant cultivars, the previous old, susceptible orchards (30,000 acres) are still producing as these young ones grow up,” says Jay Pscheidt, an OSU professor, OSU Extension Service plant pathology specialist and the lead author of the study.

In this week’s issue:

Marijuana policy reminder

Regarding the issue about marijuana questions and policy, faculty, staff, and volunteers should continue to refer to OSU policies regarding marijuana.

All media inquiries should continue be referred to Jay Noller, who is OSU’s point of contact with questions about marijuana and/or industrial hemp production in Oregon.

Although Extension isn’t allowed to directly answer questions about marijuana, we can discuss it indirectly. For instance, if a grower asks what the best pesticide is, we can tell them of pesticides used on similar crops or refer them to the Oregon Department of Agriculture.

ODA, Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC) and the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) regulate other aspects of the marijuana industry. It is OK to refer appropriate questions to these agencies as applicable.

Here are some questions we cannot answer but rather refer them to ODA or OLCC:

  • Propagation
  • How to plant and care for marijuana plants (seed, growing medium, start a nursery, weed control, germination rates, fertilizer rates, harvesting, yield)
  • Testing soils for growing marijuana
  • Hemp/marijuana growing regulations
  • Nutrient requirements, cultivars, plant physiology
  • Compounds found in marijuana
  • Size, space, slope aspect, water requirements
  • Donating gifts/funds to support research
  • Collaboration with other scientists and/or marijuana growers on projects that are not related to marijuana?
  • Analytical labs to test for residues
  • Developing edible products
  • Testing edible product for water activity, pH or microbes
  • Testing THC-free product for water activity for adding to cannabis later
  • Working on hemp or cannabidiol(s) (CBDs)
  • IPM plan for marijuana pests (e.g., monitoring, plant spacing, indicator susceptible plants, and pruning for aeration).

Also, remember that we can’t accept gifts or money from known growers of marijuana even for projects that are not related to marijuana.

In Memorium

Ray McNeilan, OSU Professor of Horticulture and head of the Extension Master Gardener Program from 1978 to 1996, has passed away. It is impossible to overstate the impact that Ray has had on Oregon’s Master Gardener Program, and on home gardeners across Oregon. He has taught generations of Master Gardeners, was a gracious colleague to fellow horticulturists, and author of several books and countless Extension fact sheets. Upon his retirement, he continued to volunteer his time and expertise to the Master Gardener Program and to the Oregon Master Gardener Association. In honor of his contributions, the Oregon Master Gardener Association funds a scholarship for an OSU Horticulture student, in Dr. McNeilan’s name. His smile was huge, as was his heart. Together with his wife Jan (who was also an OSU Extension Professional, and the Coordinator of OSU’s Master Gardener Program from 2003 to 2007), the McNeilans helped to establish the Statewide Master Gardener Endowment Fund at OSU, which has been integral to keeping the program strong, to this day. A giant in the world of horticulture, he was humble, generous, and always had a huge smile. His legacy will live on in the generations of Master Gardeners he has trained, the students who study horticulture at OSU via the Ray McNeilan scholarship, and the many colleagues he has supported and encouraged.

A celebration of life is planned for a later date, to be announced.

Election reminder

With the approach of the November elections, the information below provides guidance for public employees in their official capacity relating to election and political matters.

Public employees may not engage in certain political activity while on the job during working hours, under ORS 260.432. The statute prohibits public employees from promoting or opposing the adoption of a ballot measure, or a candidate for public office, while on the job during working hours. It also prohibits any person from requiring or attempting to require other public employees to give money, service or anything of value to promote or oppose a ballot measure or a candidate.

The statute does not mean that you give up your individual rights to engage in political activity as a result of your public employment. However, it is important to be clear when you are speaking in your private capacity. The Secretary of State notes that the use of a working title tends to indicate that an employee is acting in the employee’s official capacity. It would be prudent for you to avoid using your OSU title if you promote or oppose candidates or ballot measures. If there is any question about the capacity in which you are speaking or acting, it would also be prudent for you to expressly state that you are speaking and acting in your private capacity and not as an OSU employee.

The Oregon Secretary of State has published valuable guidance on this law, titled “Restrictions on Political Campaigning by Public Employees, ORS 260.432.”  The guidance can be found at:  http://sos.oregon.gov/elections/Documents/restrictions.pdf.

The penalties for non-compliance with this statute are potentially severe. The Secretary of State may impose a civil penalty of up to $1000 for each violation, and the district attorney or a taxpayer may seek recovery of any improper expenditure of public funds in connection with promotion or opposition of a candidate or ballot measure.

If you have any questions about this matter, please feel free to contact the Oregon State University Office of Human Resources at:  human.resources@oregonstate.edu.

Below are some resources to help you professionally and effectively communicate with legislators. Information available on OSU Government Relations State Advocacy site:

150 Events in full swing

The OSU150 Land Grant Festival, from Oct. 1 to 17 at Oregon State’s Corvallis campus, is under way with two dozen free events including art exhibits, the wave lab, and a lecture about the future of energy. Of special interest is The Promise and Peril of Artificial Intelligence and Robotics on October 23.You can pick and choose what portions of the symposium you want to attend. However, please, do not delay as registrations are coming in briskly.

This free, daylong Futures Focus Symposium at the LaSells Stewart Center is expected to attract more than 1,000 attendees to consider the potential benefits, risks, ethics and uncertainties of the emerging technologies of artificial intelligence and robotics. Invited national and OSU experts will share their insights into the potential for AI and robotics to transform agriculture, health care, natural resource management, transportation, arts and entertainment, as well as consider possible impacts on jobs, the economy, our communities, laws and privacy.

Extension Web Update

This week’s web upgrade blog reveals a “New Look to Topic Pages Coming Soon”. Get a sneak peek at the new visual designs that will roll out this month. Topic pages on the Extension website will be curated by topic committees made up of representatives from the various content teams that contribute content to the topic. These topic stewards will feature fresh and relevant content to meet changing seasons and audience’s interests.

Diversity Highlights

Please contact analu.fonseca@oregonstate.edu with any questions or comments or if you have suggestions for events or news stories to include in Diversity Highlights.

Events & Resources

Rogue Valley Pride 2018 “Rising with Pride!”: Ashland hosts space for diversity and inclusiveness in the 2018 Parade! We will create a colorful atmosphere of fun, and more importantly, celebrate our LGBTQ+ community in Southern Oregon! This year’s theme is “Rising with Pride.” October 13 from 11:00 am to 3:00 pm in Ashland, for more info visit the event page.

Persistent Health Disparities: The Laurel Case Lecture and Visiting Professorship presents Denise Rodgers, M.D., vice chancellor of Interprofessional Programs and director of Urban Health and Wellness Institute, Rutgers University. October 17 from 11:30 to 1:30 in Portland, for more info visit the event page.

Hispanic Heritage Day at the Oregon State Capitol: To conclude National Hispanic Heritage Month the Oregon State Capitol Foundation is proud to sponsor this event through the Capitol History Gateway Program. Enjoy music, dancing, art and exhibits during this free, family-friendly event that is open to the public. October 20 from 10:00 am to 2:00 pm in Salem, for more info visit the event page.

3rd Annual DV in Indigenous, Black & Communities of Color Event: Featuring keynote speaker Vanessa Timmons, and culturally specific workshops, this multifaceted event will center the conversation around DV in Indigenous, Black, and communities of color. October 24 from 4:00 pm and 9:00 pm in Portland, if you want more info visit the event page.

In the News

We Have Work To Do

We Have Work To Do is a university-wide campaign that will be led by the Office of Institutional Diversity during the 2018-19 academic year.

After colleges promised to increase it, hiring of black faculty declined

At Oregon State University, where the 2016 federal figures analyzed by Hechinger recorded 1 percent of tenure-track instructors as being black, school leaders are working with the nonprofit Southern Regional Education Board to find black professors from southern universities, said Charlene Alexander, the university’s vice president and chief diversity officer.

Unmaking “Hispanic”: Teaching the Creation of Hispanic Identity

“Hispanic” heritage includes a diverse range of cultures, nationalities, histories and identities. This TT teaching and learning specialist offers recommendations for teaching students the complex histories behind Hispanic Heritage Month.

What are you reading?

Please share an interesting book, blog, or article you’ve read lately. What’s one insight you gleaned?

Extension in the news

Minnesota Residents Call Police On Rowdy Drunk Birds
NPR
Oregon State University’s Extension Service notes that by October, the birds that have consumed the fruit “may be tipsy, inadvertent victims of alcohol consumption.”

Tucking in hazelnut orchards for the winter
Capital Press
“Fall of 2016 it started raining and never really stopped — a big wake-up call,” Oregon State University Orchard Crops Specialist Nik Wiman said. “The mud clogs up the harvesters and you end up with really dirty loads with cleaning fees that can exceed the nuts’ value. Moisture increases kernel defects, and moldy kernels are a big problem in the industry.”

Pendleton’s dry spell lingers
East Oregonian
Don Wysocki, a soil scientist for Oregon State University Extension Service, said wheat farmers have been forced to move back their planting dates while they wait for rains to arrive.