In this week’s issue:

Marijuana policy reminder

Regarding the issue about marijuana questions and policy, faculty, staff, and volunteers should continue to refer to OSU policies regarding marijuana.

All media inquiries should continue be referred to Jay Noller, who is OSU’s point of contact with questions about marijuana and/or industrial hemp production in Oregon.

Although Extension isn’t allowed to directly answer questions about marijuana, we can discuss it indirectly. For instance, if a grower asks what the best pesticide is, we can tell them of pesticides used on similar crops or refer them to the Oregon Department of Agriculture.

ODA, Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC) and the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) regulate other aspects of the marijuana industry. It is OK to refer appropriate questions to these agencies as applicable.

Here are some questions we cannot answer but rather refer them to ODA or OLCC:

  • Propagation
  • How to plant and care for marijuana plants (seed, growing medium, start a nursery, weed control, germination rates, fertilizer rates, harvesting, yield)
  • Testing soils for growing marijuana
  • Hemp/marijuana growing regulations
  • Nutrient requirements, cultivars, plant physiology
  • Compounds found in marijuana
  • Size, space, slope aspect, water requirements
  • Donating gifts/funds to support research
  • Collaboration with other scientists and/or marijuana growers on projects that are not related to marijuana?
  • Analytical labs to test for residues
  • Developing edible products
  • Testing edible product for water activity, pH or microbes
  • Testing THC-free product for water activity for adding to cannabis later
  • Working on hemp or cannabidiol(s) (CBDs)
  • IPM plan for marijuana pests (e.g., monitoring, plant spacing, indicator susceptible plants, and pruning for aeration).

Also, remember that we can’t accept gifts or money from known growers of marijuana even for projects that are not related to marijuana.

In Memorium

Ray McNeilan, OSU Professor of Horticulture and head of the Extension Master Gardener Program from 1978 to 1996, has passed away. It is impossible to overstate the impact that Ray has had on Oregon’s Master Gardener Program, and on home gardeners across Oregon. He has taught generations of Master Gardeners, was a gracious colleague to fellow horticulturists, and author of several books and countless Extension fact sheets. Upon his retirement, he continued to volunteer his time and expertise to the Master Gardener Program and to the Oregon Master Gardener Association. In honor of his contributions, the Oregon Master Gardener Association funds a scholarship for an OSU Horticulture student, in Dr. McNeilan’s name. His smile was huge, as was his heart. Together with his wife Jan (who was also an OSU Extension Professional, and the Coordinator of OSU’s Master Gardener Program from 2003 to 2007), the McNeilans helped to establish the Statewide Master Gardener Endowment Fund at OSU, which has been integral to keeping the program strong, to this day. A giant in the world of horticulture, he was humble, generous, and always had a huge smile. His legacy will live on in the generations of Master Gardeners he has trained, the students who study horticulture at OSU via the Ray McNeilan scholarship, and the many colleagues he has supported and encouraged.

A celebration of life is planned for a later date, to be announced.

Election reminder

With the approach of the November elections, the information below provides guidance for public employees in their official capacity relating to election and political matters.

Public employees may not engage in certain political activity while on the job during working hours, under ORS 260.432. The statute prohibits public employees from promoting or opposing the adoption of a ballot measure, or a candidate for public office, while on the job during working hours. It also prohibits any person from requiring or attempting to require other public employees to give money, service or anything of value to promote or oppose a ballot measure or a candidate.

The statute does not mean that you give up your individual rights to engage in political activity as a result of your public employment. However, it is important to be clear when you are speaking in your private capacity. The Secretary of State notes that the use of a working title tends to indicate that an employee is acting in the employee’s official capacity. It would be prudent for you to avoid using your OSU title if you promote or oppose candidates or ballot measures. If there is any question about the capacity in which you are speaking or acting, it would also be prudent for you to expressly state that you are speaking and acting in your private capacity and not as an OSU employee.

The Oregon Secretary of State has published valuable guidance on this law, titled “Restrictions on Political Campaigning by Public Employees, ORS 260.432.”  The guidance can be found at:  http://sos.oregon.gov/elections/Documents/restrictions.pdf.

The penalties for non-compliance with this statute are potentially severe. The Secretary of State may impose a civil penalty of up to $1000 for each violation, and the district attorney or a taxpayer may seek recovery of any improper expenditure of public funds in connection with promotion or opposition of a candidate or ballot measure.

If you have any questions about this matter, please feel free to contact the Oregon State University Office of Human Resources at:  human.resources@oregonstate.edu.

Below are some resources to help you professionally and effectively communicate with legislators. Information available on OSU Government Relations State Advocacy site:

150 Events in full swing

The OSU150 Land Grant Festival, from Oct. 1 to 17 at Oregon State’s Corvallis campus, is under way with two dozen free events including art exhibits, the wave lab, and a lecture about the future of energy. Of special interest is The Promise and Peril of Artificial Intelligence and Robotics on October 23.You can pick and choose what portions of the symposium you want to attend. However, please, do not delay as registrations are coming in briskly.

This free, daylong Futures Focus Symposium at the LaSells Stewart Center is expected to attract more than 1,000 attendees to consider the potential benefits, risks, ethics and uncertainties of the emerging technologies of artificial intelligence and robotics. Invited national and OSU experts will share their insights into the potential for AI and robotics to transform agriculture, health care, natural resource management, transportation, arts and entertainment, as well as consider possible impacts on jobs, the economy, our communities, laws and privacy.

Extension Web Update

This week’s web upgrade blog reveals a “New Look to Topic Pages Coming Soon”. Get a sneak peek at the new visual designs that will roll out this month. Topic pages on the Extension website will be curated by topic committees made up of representatives from the various content teams that contribute content to the topic. These topic stewards will feature fresh and relevant content to meet changing seasons and audience’s interests.

Diversity Highlights

Please contact analu.fonseca@oregonstate.edu with any questions or comments or if you have suggestions for events or news stories to include in Diversity Highlights.

Events & Resources

Rogue Valley Pride 2018 “Rising with Pride!”: Ashland hosts space for diversity and inclusiveness in the 2018 Parade! We will create a colorful atmosphere of fun, and more importantly, celebrate our LGBTQ+ community in Southern Oregon! This year’s theme is “Rising with Pride.” October 13 from 11:00 am to 3:00 pm in Ashland, for more info visit the event page.

Persistent Health Disparities: The Laurel Case Lecture and Visiting Professorship presents Denise Rodgers, M.D., vice chancellor of Interprofessional Programs and director of Urban Health and Wellness Institute, Rutgers University. October 17 from 11:30 to 1:30 in Portland, for more info visit the event page.

Hispanic Heritage Day at the Oregon State Capitol: To conclude National Hispanic Heritage Month the Oregon State Capitol Foundation is proud to sponsor this event through the Capitol History Gateway Program. Enjoy music, dancing, art and exhibits during this free, family-friendly event that is open to the public. October 20 from 10:00 am to 2:00 pm in Salem, for more info visit the event page.

3rd Annual DV in Indigenous, Black & Communities of Color Event: Featuring keynote speaker Vanessa Timmons, and culturally specific workshops, this multifaceted event will center the conversation around DV in Indigenous, Black, and communities of color. October 24 from 4:00 pm and 9:00 pm in Portland, if you want more info visit the event page.

In the News

We Have Work To Do

We Have Work To Do is a university-wide campaign that will be led by the Office of Institutional Diversity during the 2018-19 academic year.

After colleges promised to increase it, hiring of black faculty declined

At Oregon State University, where the 2016 federal figures analyzed by Hechinger recorded 1 percent of tenure-track instructors as being black, school leaders are working with the nonprofit Southern Regional Education Board to find black professors from southern universities, said Charlene Alexander, the university’s vice president and chief diversity officer.

Unmaking “Hispanic”: Teaching the Creation of Hispanic Identity

“Hispanic” heritage includes a diverse range of cultures, nationalities, histories and identities. This TT teaching and learning specialist offers recommendations for teaching students the complex histories behind Hispanic Heritage Month.

What are you reading?

Please share an interesting book, blog, or article you’ve read lately. What’s one insight you gleaned?

Extension in the news

Minnesota Residents Call Police On Rowdy Drunk Birds
NPR
Oregon State University’s Extension Service notes that by October, the birds that have consumed the fruit “may be tipsy, inadvertent victims of alcohol consumption.”

Tucking in hazelnut orchards for the winter
Capital Press
“Fall of 2016 it started raining and never really stopped — a big wake-up call,” Oregon State University Orchard Crops Specialist Nik Wiman said. “The mud clogs up the harvesters and you end up with really dirty loads with cleaning fees that can exceed the nuts’ value. Moisture increases kernel defects, and moldy kernels are a big problem in the industry.”

Pendleton’s dry spell lingers
East Oregonian
Don Wysocki, a soil scientist for Oregon State University Extension Service, said wheat farmers have been forced to move back their planting dates while they wait for rains to arrive.

In this week’s issue:

Communication and connection opportunities

Is there anything about which you are interested, curious, or concerned? Here are some ways to share and ask:

  • Online form to submit questions (Think of this like a virtual comment box.)
  • OSU Extension Slack workspace or informal communication and collaboration
  • Read ConnEXTions weekly, and contribute!
  • O&E blog with First Monday videos (Engage via the comment section!)
  • Outreach & Engagement Quarterly Conversations (Next: November 16, 2018)

Diversity Webinar

An exciting webinar is being offered Tuesday, October 23 at 10 AM. It is:   “California 4-H Embracing Diversity & Fostering Inclusion – Not an easy task!” California 4-H leads the largest 4-H Latino Youth initiative in the nation. The initiative started in 2015 when the California 4-H team set high total enrollment expectations and achieve parity for Latino, Black and Asian youth.  In 2016, we started a pilot program in seven counties, focused in the Latino community and hired bilingual and bicultural program representatives in an effort to introduce 4-H to the Latino community, our initial goal was getting to know the community and offered new and innovative 4-H delivery modes, like afterschool programs and day camps. After two years, California 4-H has increase total enrollment by 38.7%, the participation of the Latino youth in California 4-H by 89.3% and the number of counties which achieved parity by 70%. During our presentation we will share our challenges and opportunities during our journey in an effort to motivate the audience to embrace diversity and foster inclusion in their 4-H programs.

Update: OSU Extension Professional Development Fund

Next Application Deadline — November 1, 2018
The next quarterly deadline for Extension Professional Development Funds is November 1st. Applications that will be considered must be submitted BEFORE the deadline and BEFORE the professional development opportunity.

“Growing the Fund”
Extension faculty and staff may help “GROW the Fund” at any time during the year. Keep the following in mind:

  • The principal of the OSU Extension Professional Development Fund is an endowment.
  • The earnings from the endowment feeds into the current-use-fund.
  • Each quarter, the amount in the current-use-fund pays for the professional development requests selected for funding.
  • The fund supports on average, about 100-160 different professional development opportunities a year.

The two ways individuals may currently contribute throughout the year are:

  • Through payroll deduction (deductions could range from $5.00 a month to any larger amount)
  • Through individual contributions (payable by check or credit card)
  • Either of these types of contributions may be processed on-line through the OSU Foundation
  • Contributions may be made to the following fund:

6220-820450 OSU Extension Professional Development Fund (Endowment Fund)

Extension Web Update

Extension faculty and staff can stay on top of web updates and share your input through events this month. EESC is gearing up for web trainings, and giving web status and strategy reports to different groups throughout October. Read this week’s web upgrade blog post for who will be involved and the upcoming dates, times, and places.

Diversity Highlights

Please contact analu.fonseca@oregonstate.edu with any questions or comments or if you have suggestions for events or news stories to include in Diversity Highlights.

Events & Resources

Diversity and Inclusion—What, Why, and ROI: Creating A LGBTQ+ Friendly Environment for Staff, Clients, and Students— The Carlson College of Veterinary Medicine will be hosting Mike Chaddock from Michigan State University on Tuesday, Oct. 9, from 5:30 to 7 p.m. in Magruder Hall M 102. This presentation will include basic information on diversity and inclusion and the business case for diversity and inclusion, and provide take-home ideas and tips on how to create a LGBTQ+ friendly environment. This is a free lecture open to students, staff and faculty. For questions or accommodations contact Sara.k.smith@oregonstate.edu or 541-737-6779.

How to Identify Culturally Diverse and LGBTQ+ Friendly Educational and Employment Opportunities AND How to Make the Environment LGBTQ+ Friendly”: Hosted by Carlson College of Veterinary Medicine & Banfield Pet Hospital in Corvallis October 8 at 12:00 pm in the MagruderHall Room 2012.

Diversity, Inclusion, and Equity—What and Why. Creating a LGBTQ+ Friendly Environment for Staff and Clients”
Hosted by Carlson College of Veterinary Medicine & Banfield Pet Hospital in Corvallis October 8 at 5:30 pm in the Magruder Hall Room 2012.

Mental Health Outcomes and Stressors in LGBTQ+ DVM Workforce and the Classroom
Hosted by Carlson College of Veterinary Medicine & Banfield Pet Hospital in Corvallis October 9 at 12:00 pm in the Magruder Hall Room 2012.

Trauma Informed Care Training: Serving Unhoused People and Sustaining Our Natural Areas: There is a need to cultivate sensitivity and connect with other resource providers to develop flexible and adaptive approaches that support both unhoused people and natural areas. Join this conversation at a workshop on Oct. 10 at the CH2M Hill Alumni. Cost: $10 (scholarships available by request). Contact Elsa.Curtis@oregonstate.edu or 541-737-1346 for scholarship questions or accommodations requests. Register now: bit.ly/unhoused2018

(In)Visible Series: Living in Albany: A series of events meant to improve community relationships in Albany. This series is intended to improve the collective understanding of what intersectionality is, what actions Albany residents can take in their community, and what changes they want to see in how they interact with each other in their daily lives.  Oct. 14, Nov. 11, Dec. 9, 2-4 p.m., Fellowship Hall, First Christian Church 432 S.W. Ferry St, Albany. This event was funded through a Health Equity grant written by OSU Extension Linn County.

In the News

Inspiring Future Leaders

When you think of scientists, what comes to mind? Lab coats and microscopes? Beakers and goggles? These images are how science is often portrayed through media, but for many youth—especially in underserved communities—it might be the only impression they have.

LatinX Heritage Month: A festival of culture, history and tradition

From art exhibits to film screenings to operas to a celebration of life and death, this year’s UO LatinX Heritage Month honors the diverse LatinX community.

What are you reading?

Please share an interesting book, blog, or article you’ve read lately. What’s one insight you gleaned?

Extension in the news

Class in the woods: Klamath County sixth-graders participate in forestry tour
Herald and News
Daniel Leavell is an assistant forestry professor with the Oregon State University Klamath Basin Research and Extension Center, which organized the event. He said the event provides students with knowledge about the forests they use for camping, hunting and fishing. “We use products from the forest all the time,” he said.

In this week’s issue:

    • Communication and connection opportunities

      Is there anything about which you are interested, curious, or concerned? Here are some ways to share and ask:

      • Online form to submit questions (Think of this like a virtual comment box.)
      • OSU Extension Slack workspace or informal communication and collaboration
      • Read ConnEXTions weekly, and contribute!
      • O&E blog with First Monday videos (Engage via the comment section!)
      • Outreach & Engagement Quarterly Conversations (Next: November 16, 2018)

      Revised OSU Model Releases for photos, etc.

      University Relations and Marketing made a couple of updates to OSU’s Model Release Forms. Beginning now, please use the new forms located with the OSU Brand materials. Instructions and link to forms are at: https://communications.oregonstate.edu/brand-guide/visual-identity/photography/contracts-and-model-releases

      Extension Web Update

      With the changing of seasons, this can be a good time to review, update, and create content that web audiences may be interested in this time of year. In the process, take a moment to assess not only if the writing is accurate but readable. This week’s website upgrade blog post looks at how “articles” (rather than downloadable documents) are the most widely read type of content on the Extension website, and how simple formatting can make articles easier to read online.

      Diversity Highlights

      Please contact analu.fonseca@oregonstate.edu with any questions or comments or if you have suggestions for events or news stories to include in Diversity Highlights.

      Special Annoucement

      OSU launches We Have Work To Do campaign: This student focused, year-long campaign celebrates the strides OSU has made to create a more diverse and equitable university, while recognizing that there is still much work to be done. For more information, visit the website: https://diversity.oregonstate.edu/we-have-work-to-do

      Events & Resources

      Trauma Informed Care Training: Serving Unhoused People and Sustaining Our Natural Areas: There is a need to cultivate sensitivity and connect with other resource providers to develop flexible and adaptive approaches that support both unhoused people and natural areas. Join this conversation at a workshop on Oct. 10 at the CH2M Hill Alumni. Cost: $10 (scholarships available by request). Contact Elsa.Curtis@oregonstate.edu or 541-737-1346 for scholarship questions or accommodations requests. Register now: bit.ly/unhoused2018

      3 Doors: Diversity, Equity and Inclusion: What must the science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) community do to diversify who succeeds in our disciplines and related careers? Find out September 28 from 10:30 to 11:30 in Portland, for more information visit the event page.

      Queer History Month BBQ: A social get together for the LGBTQIA+ community at OSU and around Corvallis for good food and a good time. October 4 from 4:00 om to 6:00 pm in Corvallis, for more information visit the event page.

      2nd Annual My Hair, My Health PDX!: My Hair My Health PDX! is an award winning, one-day community celebration adapted from San Bernadino Department of Public Health’s program designed for African-American women. October 6 from 1:30 to 5:00 in Portland, for more information visit the event page.

      In the News

      Lesbian, gay and bisexual teens at higher risk of substance abuse, study finds 

      According to a new study published in Drug and Alcohol Dependence, researchers from Oregon State University found that lesbian, gay, and bisexual youths are at a higher risk of substance use compared to their heterosexual peers.

      First-generation students construct their own path

      Oregon State University is home to almost 32,000 students on its Corvallis campus, some who are the first in their family to attend college. First-generation student and President of Oregon State University Ed Ray is an example of what success can look like after a higher education.

      Oregon State University honored for commitment to diversity

      Oregon State University has received the 2018 Higher Education Excellence in Diversity (HEED) Award from INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine, the oldest and largest diversity-focused publication in higher education.

      What are you reading?

      Please share an interesting book, blog, or article you’ve read lately. What’s one insight you gleaned?

      Extension in the news?

      What’s the difference between green, orange and red peppers?
      mnn.com
      Oregon State University Extension Service explains that “all pepper fruits are ripened ovaries containing seeds formed after pollination.”

In this week’s issue:

Communication and connection opportunities

Is there anything about which you are interested, curious, or concerned? Here are some ways to share and ask:

  • Online form to submit questions (Think of this like a virtual comment box.)
  • OSU Extension Slack workspace or informal communication and collaboration
  • Read ConnEXTions weekly, and contribute!
  • O&E blog with First Monday videos (Engage via the comment section!)
  • Outreach & Engagement Quarterly Conversations (Next: November 16, 2018)

Land Grant Festival commemorates Oregon State’s 150th anniversary

The OSU150 Land Grant Festival, from Oct. 1 to 17 at Oregon State’s Corvallis campus, features nearly two dozen free events including art exhibits, tours of wine, beer and cheese making facilities and a lecture about the future of energy.

Extension Web Update

Extension reaches people in many different ways and on many different topics, and this can feel complex when trying to present all of this on the website. In this week’s web upgrade blog post, we look at “Clarifying Programs, Projects, and Topics on the Websiteto provide guidance on the existing ways content is organized and explain the new addition of a “project” content type.

Diversity Highlights

Please contact analu.fonseca@oregonstate.edu with any questions or comments or if you have suggestions for events or news stories to include in Diversity Highlights.

Events & Resources

Pride Connect: Join the Pride Center during Welcome Week 2018 for a social event for all LGBTQIA+ members of the OSU and Corvallis community. September 19 from 2:00 pm to 4:00pm in Corvallis, for more info check the event page. 

Autumn Moon Festival: Celebrate the Autumn Moon Festival, one of the four most important holidays on the Chinese calendar, at Lan Su Chinese Garden with extended hours until 9 p.m. on Saturday, September 22. For more information visit the event page.

8th Annual Warm Springs Tribal Celebration: On Saturday, September 22nd, the Warm Springs Tribes will celebrate the history of their ancestors during the eighth annual Warm Springs Tribal Celebration at Mt. Hood Skibowl. For more information visit the event page.

3 Doors: Diversity, Equity and Inclusion: What must the science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) community do to diversify who succeeds in our disciplines and related careers? John Matsui, Ph.D., assistant dean, Biological Sciences, director and co-founder, Biology Scholars Program, University of California, Berkeley, will share his insights and recommendations.  September 28 in Porland from 10:30 am to 11:30 am, for more information visit the event page.

2ND Annual My Hair, My Health PDX!: My Hair My Health PDX! is an award winning, one-day community celebration designed for African-American women. This event will speak to your mind, body, and soul! Come and experience workshops, dancing, vendors, food tasting, and other resources that encourage healthy hair, eating, and active living! October 6 from 1:30 pm to 5:00 pm in Portland, for more information visit the event page.

Rice Krispies Make Love More Accessible With Braille Snack Notes

For many parents, putting a note in their kids’ lunch is a way to connect with them, share a joke, inspire them to do well, or just to let the little ones know they’re loved. But what about the over 63,000 school-aged visually impaired kids that can’t read a note in their lunch box?

Lesbian Oral History Project to become part of UO collections

The history of Eugene’s lesbian community from the 1960s through the 1990s will be kept alive through video interviews and archival documents of more than 140 women taking part in the UO’s Lesbian Oral History project.

Combatting social isolation

No one should ever feel isolated. This belief motivates Jonathan Garcia, PhD, to combat social isolation among Latino lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning (LGBTQ) youth living in the U.S.

The impact of IMPACT

Oregon State alumni share many of the same experiences, and for thousands of them, a defining experience is IMPACT.

What are you reading?

Please share an interesting book, blog, or article you’ve read lately. What’s one insight you gleaned?

Extension in the news

Women of the Woodlands
The Corvallis Advocate
“The goal is for women to come together and learn not only from whatever educational opportunity we’re offering at that time, but also to network and engage with one another and to share experiences between each other,” says Tiffany Hopkins, the coordinator for both WOWNet and the Master Woodland Manager Program for Oregon State University’s College of Forestry’s Forestry and Natural Resources Extension Program. “

Mallory-Smith reflects on past, sees a future of challenges
Capital Press
In a sweeping discourse at the OSU Extension Seed Crop and Cereal Production Meeting in Salem, Ore., Sept. 12, Carol Mallory-Smith reflected on her career and addressed what growers might expect in the future.

Grand Ronde Food Bank hosts resiliency event
Smoke Signals
On Wednesday, Sept. 5, the Grand Ronde Food Bank– iskam mfkHmfk haws– joined in as one of several live-stream sites for the “Communities, Food, Resilience” event, sponsored by Oregon State University Extension Service in celebration of its 150th anniversary.

 

In this week’s issue:

Angela Sandino is the new Extension Metro Regional Director

Angela Sandino is the new Metro Regional Director.  She will begin her new duties on September 17, 2018.  Mike Bondi and Wiley Thompson will continue to assist with the transition of leadership in the region.

Communication and connection opportunities

Is there anything about which you are interested, curious, or concerned? Here are some ways to share and ask:

  • Online form to submit questions (Think of this like a virtual comment box.)
  • OSU Extension Slack workspace or informal communication and collaboration
  • Read ConnEXTions weekly, and contribute!
  • O&E blog with First Monday videos (Engage via the comment section!)
  • Outreach & Engagement Quarterly Conversations (Next: November 16, 2018)

Oregon State to host robotics and artificial intelligence symposium

Oregon State University will culminate the 15-month celebration of its 150th anniversary with a day long symposium on how artificial intelligence and robotics may change society, jobs and the economy.

The Promise and the Peril of Artificial Intelligence and Robotics,” takes place on Oct. 23 at the LaSells Stewart Center and the CH2M Hill Alumni Center.

Registration is open for the free, daylong symposium, which will attract industry, higher education faculty and leaders, policy makers and is open to the public.

Extension Web Update

In the planning of the website upgrade project, there were certain criteria that guided this bold change. For this week’s blog post, we are Remembering What Guided us to this Point and how the advice from back then can help us to stay focused on the strategy moving forward.

Diversity Highlights

Please contact analu.fonseca@oregonstate.edu with any questions or comments or if you have suggestions for events or news stories to include in Diversity Highlights.

Events & Resources

Trauma Informed Care Training: Serving Unhoused People and Sustaining Our Natural Areas: There is a need to cultivate sensitivity and connect with other resource providers to develop flexible and adaptive approaches that support both unhoused people and natural areas. Join this conversation at a workshop on Oct. 10 at the CH2M Hill Alumni. Cost: $10 (scholarships available by request). Contact Elsa.Curtis@oregonstate.edu or 541-737-1346 for scholarship questions or accommodations requests. Register now: bit.ly/unhoused2018

Fall Term SJEI Workshop: The Social Justice Education Initiative from Faculty Affairs has a full schedule of Tier One and Tier Two workshops, both open now for registration at http://oregonstate.edu/training/course_list.php?cat_id=46. Join your colleagues and peers to begin, or continue, your social justice journey in this well-reviewed program. Contact SJEI Director Jane Waite for further information: jane.waite@oregonstate.edu

We the People? Belonging & the US Constitution: What does the Constitution have to say about citizenship, immigration, and questions of inclusion and exclusion? How have those concepts and their interpretations changed over time? September 17 from 2:00pm to 3:00pm in Corvallis, for more info visit the event page.

Aging our Way: 2018 Gay and Grey Expo: The country’s largest gathering for LGBT older adults and allies, registration is required. September 22 from 9:00 am to 3:30 pm in Portland, for more info visit the event page.

25th Polish Festival: The Polish festival is an event for families and singles, adults and children, for food connoisseurs, music lovers, concert goers, dance enthusiasts. September 22-23 in Portland, for more information visit the event page.

In the News

Faculty and Staff: Share your SNAP Story

Beavers know how to work hard – how to get out there and dig in to accomplish big things. But a growling stomach is distracting and bound to slow down even the best students.

Low-Income Students Get Penalized For Having To Work Their Way Through College

When Seth Frotman, the U.S. official who investigated predatory student loan lending practices at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, quit last week, his resignation letter, became hot reading.

Decolonizing the classroom: Is there space for Indigenous knowledge in academia?

“Education is what got us into this mess … but education is the key to reconciliation,” said Senator Murray Sinclair, who led the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

These Gorgeous Photographs Show Indigenous Americans Without the Stereotypes

Three years ago, Matika Wilbur set out on an ambitious undertaking: a vast road trip across America to photograph members of all 562 of America’s federally-recognized tribes.

Where are blacks, women? Living history museums rethink past

A Massachusetts living history museum that depicts life in the early 19th century is looking to overhaul the way it presents the past in an effort to stay relevant to a 21st century audience.

What are you reading?

Please share an interesting book, blog, or article you’ve read lately. What’s one insight you gleaned?

Extension in the news

This year, caterpillars in tents intense
St. Helens Chronicle
“They don’t look attractive, but they are harmless,” said Chip Bubl of the Oregon State University Extension Office in St. Helens. “They are one of two varieties we see in this area. The other is the western tree caterpillar, which is usually active in the spring, between June and April and also builds a tent.”

Large number of dying conifers attributed to drought, heat
KGW
Glenn Ahrens is a Forester with Oregon State University Extension. He’s been studying trees for more than three decades.

Getting started a tall order for beginning farmers
Capital Press
“Farming is not a “1, 2, 3, here is what you need to know,” said Amy Garrett, also of OSU Extension Small Farms.

Using drones for wildfire suppression
USDA radio network
Victor Villegas explains how drones are helping with the wildfire fight.

In this week’s issue:

OSU Extension Professional Development Fund

Next Application Deadline — November 1, 2018
The next quarterly deadline for Extension Professional Development Funds is November 1st. Applications that will be considered must be submitted BEFORE the deadline and BEFORE the professional development opportunity.

Communication and connection opportunities

Is there anything about which you are interested, curious, or concerned? Here are some ways to share and ask:

  • Online form to submit questions (Think of this like a virtual comment box.)
  • OSU Extension Slack workspace or informal communication and collaboration
  • Read ConnEXTions weekly, and contribute!
  • O&E blog with First Monday videos (Engage via the comment section!)
  • Outreach & Engagement Quarterly Conversations (Next: November 16, 2018)

Extension Web Update

Starting in September the EESC web team will be ending the Friday office hours due to low use, but will continue to have the Web Support service desk available to answer questions. Individualized meetings and trainings will also be happening this fall. Stay tuned for details.

Diversity Highlights

Please contact analu.fonseca@oregonstate.edu with any questions or comments or if you have suggestions for events or news stories to include in Diversity Highlights.

Readings

Gender and Racial Disparities in a Youth Urban Agriculture Workshop Urban youth participation in agricultural activities has been linked to positive educational outcomes. This article explores the gender and racial differences in perceived knowledge gain and intended behavior change among youths participating in a youth urban agriculture workshop in 2015.

Latinos Living Well—A Diabetes Education Program for Rural-Residing Latinos Diabetes is a health issue for many Latinos. Extension can help provide diabetes self-management education for rural-residing Latinos. In a pilot study, we evaluated the Extension-delivered diabetes program Latinos Living Well (LLW), as provided to 76 rural-residing Latino adults in a midwestern state.

RELAX to Relajarse: A Framework for Culturally Adapting Educational Programming in Extension Family life and Extension family and consumer science educators are encouraged to adapt existing curricula to effectively use with ethnically diverse audiences. Scholars have described different methods for culturally adapting programming; however, few have documented the process by which Extension educators may tackle this endeavor. The purpose of this article is to provide a framework and step-by-step example for how one Extension program was translated and culturally adapted for U.S. Latino participants. Lessons learned and recommendations are provided.

Strategies for 4-H Program Planning and Recruitment Relative to African American Male Youths

Extension educators often seek new strategies for engaging minority youths in 4-H programs, especially young Black males. These strategies require programming developed in response to the context of this population. We offer insights into the social context of Black males and offer suggestions that will help educators develop identity and integrative site-based programs for this population.

Events & Resources

Trauma Informed Care Training: Serving Unhoused People & Sustaining Our Natural Areas: There is a demonstrable need to cultivate sensitivity and connect with other resource providers to develop flexible and adaptive approaches that support both unhoused people and natural areas. Join this conversation at a workshop on Oct. 10 at the CH2M Hill Alumni. Cost: $10 (scholarships available by request). Contact Elsa.Curtis@oregonstate.edu or 541-737-1346 for scholarship questions or accommodations requests. Register now: bit.ly/unhoused2018 

2018 Basic Rights Statewide Leadership Summit: As a hub for our statewide LGBTQ community, our 3rd annual summit is the place to be to build your personal skills, make connections, and join the movement for LGBTQ justice across Oregon. September 8th from 10:00am to 5:00pm in Eugene, for more information visit the event page.

Latino Fest: The Latino Community Association (LCA) invites the community to the Latino Fest on September 15th, 2018 at Madras’s Sahalee Park from 10am-6pm. For more information visit the event page.

Aging our Way: 2018 Gay and Grey Expo: The country’s largest gathering for LGBT older adults and allies. September 22nd from 9:00am to 3:30pm in Portland, for more information visit the event page. 

In the News

Area high schools get glimpse of tribal ways

Dozens of area high school students got a peek at life from the view of local American Indian tribes in an effort to bridge cultural divides

Strong Women: OSU Extension program provides strength in numbers
Strong Women and its counterpart, Strong Bones, are programs of the Oregon State University Extension Office.

Ginew Releases a Stunning Lookbook Shot on the Umatilla Indian Reservation
Ginew’s story sounds like the beginning of a superhero tale. Married duo Erik Brodt and Amanda Bruegl spend their days helping sick patients—as a family medicine doctor and women’s oncology doctor, respectively. But on nights and weekends they design and run the country’s only Native-owned, premium denim collection.

Everyday Heroes: Salem teen spearheads effort to create homeless youth shelter
We meet Raul Marquez, who as a senior at McKay High School in Salem convinced the board of the United Way of the Mid-Willamette Valley to provide a grant for $100,000 to create a homeless youth shelter.

Daunting but dreamt-of: New Portland school aims to change the narrative for children of color

Butler has spent the past year in preparation for the revival of Harriet Tubman, the middle school that black Portlanders created in the 1980s through protests but the district closed in 2012 citing low enrollment.

What are you reading?

Book: Boys in the Boat (2013) by Daniel James Brown

Gives a gut wrenching journey through the brutal conditions people lived through during the Great Depression.  Very uplifting in the end.  An inspiration for all. Scott Duggan

Extension in the news

Sept. 1 is Chip Bubl Day, county proclaims
St. Helens Chronicle
Chip Bubl has served as Columbia County’s OSU extension agent for 40 years and is an OSU associate professor of horticulture; and whereas, during his tenure, Chip Bubl has contributed immensely to the education…

Fall Into the Fall Garden
The Source Weekly
“Some of the main factors that contribute to these difficulties include temperature, precipitation, soil types, elevation, USDA hardiness zones and microclimates,” wrote Amy Jo Detweiler, an associate professor in home and commercial horticulture at Oregon State University, in an article about gardening in Central Oregon.

In this week’s issue:

Communication and connection opportunities

Is there anything about which you are interested, curious, or concerned? Here are some ways to share and ask:

  • Online form to submit questions (Think of this like a virtual comment box.)
  • OSU Extension Slack workspace or informal communication and collaboration
  • Read ConnEXTions weekly, and contribute!
  • O&E blog with First Monday videos (Engage via the comment section!)
  • Outreach & Engagement Quarterly Conversations (Next: November 16, 2018)

Peter Bloome Memorial Service

The memorial service for Peter Bloome will be Saturday, September 1 at 2:30 PM. The service will be at St. Mary’s Church, 501 NW 25th Street, Corvallis. The family wishes to express that anyone is welcome to attend but they don’t want anyone to feel obligated. They also want to say thanks for the many years of meaning and support that OSU extension has provided to their dad.

New statewide map now available

The new statewide map has been updated and is now ready to use. The updated map is available from the photo archive or the Bridges to Prosperity site.

Extension Web Update

With any big website transition, the amount of content to sort through is a big task, leaving people to ask “Who is going to enter all this content?” This week’s blog post for the Extension web upgrade project looks at who has taken on the responsibilities of entering content, and ways to reduce the effort through taking a closer look at the content being considered for inclusion.

Diversity Highlights

Please contact analu.fonseca@oregonstate.edu with any questions or comments or if you have suggestions for events or news stories to include in Diversity Highlights.

Events & Resources

Trauma Informed Care Training: Serving Unhoused People & Sustaining Our Natural Areas: There is a demonstrable need to cultivate sensitivity and connect with other resource providers to develop flexible and adaptive approaches that support both unhoused people and natural areas. Join this conversation at a workshop on Oct. 10 at the CH2M Hill Alumni. Cost: $10 (scholarships available by request). Contact Elsa.Curtis@oregonstate.edu or 541-737-1346 for scholarship questions or accommodations requests. Register now: bit.ly/unhoused2018

Images and Voices of the Queer Diaspora: An exhibition about queer displacement what is it like to be gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, gender nonconforming—and, in most cases, a person of color in the West. September, 2nd from 12:00 pm to  8:00 pm in Portland, for more info visit the event page.

Everyday Leaders Recognizing Leadership Beyond Power and Authority

Lois Ruskai Melina will lead a conversation exploring questions such as, how are leadership, power, and authority different? What do every day acts of leadership look like? August, 30 from 3:30pm to 4:30pm in La Grande, for more info visit the event page.

Serbian Fest 2018

12th Annual Serbian Festival on September 8th & 9th. This is a celebration of food, wine, dance and culture of the Serbian Orthodox people. For more info visit the event page.

Multicultural Day at the Capitol

This is the first Multicultural Day at the Capitol that celebrates the contributions of all cultures to the state of Oregon. Learn more about the diversity within our state at this four-hour family-friendly event, complete with activities, exhibits, performances. September 8 from 10:00am to 2:00pm in Salem, for more info visit the event page.

In the News

Strengthening native roots with higher education

Accepting comfort was not enough of a challenge for Gustavo Ramos Nuñez, whose decision to enroll in the Spanish bachelor’s degree program online through Oregon State Ecampus arose from honoring his Peruvian roots and a desire for self-improvement.

National Park Service Awards $1.5 Million in Grants for Preservation of Japanese American Confinement Sites

The National Park Service today announced more than $1.5 million in Japanese American Confinement Sites grants. The money will fund preservation, restoration, and education projects related to the detainment of Japanese Americans by the U.S. government during World War II.

Nature through a cultural lens

A class of roughly 50 Native American students gathered at the Tryon Creek State Natural Area last week for a day of hiking, outdoor exploration and learning.

Record $3.02 Million in Grants Awarded To 137 Oregon Cultural Organizations

As a testament to Oregonians’ steadfast and growing commitment to supporting culture, the Oregon Cultural Trust will award a record $3.02 million in grants to 137 cultural nonprofits in fiscal year 2019, a 3 percent increase over 2018 and the first time grants have exceeded $3 million. The increase is the direct result of another record year of fundraising and a 55 percent uptick in new donors.

Japanese musician recreates YInMn blue to help the children of Fukushima

It is fitting then that YInMn blue—the pigment discovered in 2009 by Oregon State University chemist Mas Subramanian—has become a part of new beginnings in northeastern Japan that was rocked by the 2011 earthquake and tsunami.

Theater’s other diversity problem: Me

Whether you call it diversity, inclusion, representation or equity, the quest to make more room for women and people of color has been the debate of the decade in the theater world.

What are you reading?

Please share an interesting book, blog, or article you’ve read lately. What’s one insight you gleaned?

Extension in the news

Oregon agencies push for more prescribed burns
KTVZ
“The one-hour threshold does not align with national standards for air quality,” Nicole Strong of the Oregon State University Extension Service said. “It’s putting an undue burden and restriction on the amount of prescribed burning and forest restoration, wildfire mitigation that we can do in the area.”

Cooperative Extension adapts to a less agricultural America (Associated Press)
Urban and suburban communities have their own health needs, says Wiley Thompson, a regional director for Oregon State University Extension.

Lamb auction raises $23,200 for Echo girl with brain tumor
Hermiston Herald
After Maddy Thomas, an 11-year-old 4-H student from Echo, showed him at the Umatilla County Fair his sale brought in $23,200 — totaling about $162 per pound at an auction where lambs were averaging $7 per pound.

In this week’s issue:

Communication and connection opportunities

Is there anything about which you are interested, curious, or concerned? Here are some ways to share and ask:

  • Online form to submit questions (Think of this like a virtual comment box.)
  • OSU Extension Slack workspace or informal communication and collaboration
  • Read ConnEXTions weekly, and contribute!
  • O&E blog with First Monday videos (Engage via the comment section!)
  • Outreach & Engagement Quarterly Conversations (Next: November 16, 2018)

Quarterly Conversation

The August Quarterly Conversation is now available for viewing. If you would like to take a closer look, the slides are available for download.  Topics of the conversation included a leadership update by Scott Reed and Lindsey Shirley, including a re-introduction of the PACE team, and a presentation about Extension’s Rural Communities Explorer by Vince Adams.

In Memoriam

Charles M. Fischer, Extension Poultry Specialist Emeritus, passed away on Saturday August 11, 2018 at the age of 96.  Charlie Began at Oregon State in the mid 1950’s as Extension Marketing Specialist for Poultry and moved to the Department of Poultry Science in 1971 as Extension Poultry Specialist, retiring in 1985.  Charlie was instrumental in the establishment of the Oregon Fryer Commission and the Oregon Broiler Growers Association in the late 1950’s, and the development of the Oregon Broiler Growers BBQ salt which is still sold by the industry today.  In the early 1990’s the Oregon Fryer Commission established an endowed scholarship in Charlie’s name to support undergraduate students in Animal Science interested in poultry. Here is Charlie’s obituary.

Extension Web Update

Since the web launch, visitors have viewed more pages (increased 67%) compared to before the launch and new visitors are attracted by the educational content on the various topics. This week’s blog post looks at the top visited topics and also how to request changes to the topic menu. Returning visitors spend more time looking at ways to get involved with programs and county office events, so EESC is available to talk about how subpages can assist with what these visitors may be looking to find.

Diversity Highlights

Please contact analu.fonseca@oregonstate.edu with any questions or comments or if you have suggestions for events or news stories to include in Diversity Highlights.

Events & Resources

Hood River Latino Festival: Latin entertainment for the whole family. Food, music and a lot of local information. We will have a a special presentation from Mariachi Juvenil de Colotlan along with local artist. August 22nd in Hood River from 3:00 pm to 9:00pm, for more info visit event page.

Conversation Project: Everyday Leaders – Recognizing Leadership Beyond Power and Authority: The notion of “leadership” often conjures up individuals with titles reflecting positions of power and authority—those who control resources and make important decisions that affect large groups of people. Many of our ideas about leadership are also influenced by race, gender, age, and other identities. August 30th from 3:30 pm tp 4:30 pm in La Grande, for more info visit the event page.

The Arab Festival: Join the Arab American Cultural Center of Oregon as they celebrate their Arab heritage with live music featuring Raid Alasmar and other musicians from the Arab world, dabka, a Souq (Bazaar), Middle Eastern cuisine, henna, games, dance, poetry, networking opportunities. September 1st from 10:00 am to 7:00 pm in Portland, for more information visit the event page.

In the News

Superintendents of color bring rich experience to schools
There are only a handful of school superintendents of color in Oregon and roughly half of them head school districts in East Multnomah County, one of the most diverse areas in the state.

Bilingual program becomes Oregon City district magnet school
What began as a small program embedded in a traditional school for the Jennings Lodge neighborhood will this year become a magnet program serving elementary-age students across the Oregon City School District.

Dove Spector and the Northwest Native American Center of Excellence
Dove Spector is a senior research assistant with the Northwest Native American Center of Excellence. Her role is to support tribal engagement and help Native American youth envision a future in advanced education and beyond.

Oregon ranks first for homeless youth

Oregon ranks first in the nation for the rate of homeless children and youth and 10th in the percentage of foster care placements, according to a new report by WalletHub.

Survey: People think Native Americans don’t exist/aren’t discriminated against
Where are Native Americans? For many Americans, tribes are relegated to history books. A recent survey found 40 percent of respondents didn’t think Native Americans still exist.

Surprise Gift: Free Tuition for All N.Y.U. Medical Students

The New York University School of Medicine announced on Thursday that it would cover the tuition of all its students, regardless of merit or need, citing concerns about the “overwhelming financial debt” facing graduates.

What are you reading?

Please share an interesting book, blog, or article you’ve read lately. What’s one insight you gleaned?

Extension in the news

Oregon City Farmers Market offers tours, recipe demos
Clackamas Review
The Oregon State University Extension Service, Clackamas County and the Oregon City Farmers Market have solved that dilemma by teaming up to offer market tours and food demonstrations on the second Saturday of the month through October.

East Oregonian
Angie Treadwell of the Oregon State University extension program and SNAP-ed coordinator promotes healthy living, but she said life is all about balance.

In this week’s issue:

Communities, Food, Resilience Event

REGISTER NOW TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE! On September 5, join leaders, researchers, colleagues and community members as we kick off an important conversation about community food resilience and food equity at the Portland Art Museum, or at any one of the 13 livestream locations. The Communities, Food, Resilience event takes place 2:30 to 5:15 p.m. with a reception following at the Oregon Historical Society from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Cost: Free. Register today!

Communication and connection opportunities

Is there anything about which you are interested, curious, or concerned? Here are some ways to share and ask:

  • Online form to submit questions (Think of this like a virtual comment box.)
  • OSU Extension Slack workspace or informal communication and collaboration
  • Read ConnEXTions weekly, and contribute!
  • O&E blog with First Monday videos (Engage via the comment section!)
  • Outreach & Engagement Quarterly Conversations (Next: August 17, 2018)

Tiffany Gillis wins F & A All Star Award

Tiffany Gillis, our Finance and Accounting Manager in the University Administrative Business Center, was recently honored as the recipient of the Division of Finance and Administration’s All Star Award. This is the highest award across a large organization that includes Budget and Fiscal Planning, Business Affairs, Human Resources, OSU Shared Services (Business Centers), Public Safety, Risk Management, and University Facilities, Infrastructure and Operations. As Scott Reed indicated in his letter supporting the nomination:
 
Tiffany is a valued colleague to Extension Service and Division administrators. I cannot imagine a more deserving nominee for this award. Tiffany Gillis represents the best qualities in an employee, and goes well beyond expectations. She does all of this with a smile and attitude that convinces those around her to excel.
 
Congratulations Tiffany! We are all very proud of you.

Extension Web Update

Have you ever received a call with someone asking “Where do I find ____ on the website?” Since the Extension website looks different than in the past, our volunteers, partners, and the public may need guidance to find where information they use is now located online. This week’s web upgrade blog post looks at how faculty and staff can give a quick tour as needed to help others to navigate the new Extension site.

Diversity Highlights

Please contact analu.fonseca@oregonstate.edu with any questions or comments or if you have suggestions for events or news stories to include in Diversity Highlights.

Special Announcements

What is the latest news on DACA? 

(1) DACA renewals continue to be accepted, (2) new DACA applications are not currently being accepted, and (3) in the near term, pending rulings could quickly change the landscape for DACA in either direction.

  • DC District Court. On August 3, Judge Bates ruled in the NAACP and Princeton cases that the entire DACA program must be restored and all qualified persons must be permitted to file new DACA applications and renewals.  Judge Bates stayed his order until August 23 to provide the government the opportunity to appeal and seek a stay. This means the order is not effective until August 23, at which time the government may be required to accept new DACA applications, in addition to DACA renewals, unless the government appeals the order.
  • Ninth Circuit. The Ninth Circuit has not yet issued its decision in the five related DACA cases, Regents of University of California and four others, that the government appealed and for which oral arguments took place on May 15, 2018.  The preliminary injunction is still in place in these cases, requiring the government to process DACA renewal applications.
  • Second Circuit. The preliminary injunction requiring the government to process DACA renewal applications is also currently in place in the New York DACA cases. Batalla Vidal and New York v. Trump are on appeal. No hearing has yet been scheduled.
  • Southern District Court in Texas. Texas and six other states have sought to terminate the entire DACA program, and that case is currently before Judge Hanen in the Southern District Court in Texas.  A hearing on the government’s request for a preliminary injunction to halt DACA was scheduled for August 8. Hanen did not issue an immediate ruling Wednesday.

With the uncertainty surrounding DACA, we encourage you to please remind all undocumented students and employees with DACA of on-campus resources available them:

  • ASOSU Student Legal Services provides no-cost attorney consultations directly to any OSU student, regardless of immigration status and where the student is located. These attorneys are not OSU employees and have a direct attorney-client relationship and privilege/confidentiality with OSU students. Students may visit ASOSU Student Legal Services on the third floor of the Student Experience Center or call 541-737-4165 to make an appointment. If students have questions about their DACA status or renewal, please encourage them to make an appointment with ASOSU Student Legal Services as soon as possible.
  • The Educational Opportunities Program (EOP) is available to provide advising and support to DACA and undocumented students. Students may contact Janet Nishihara  or Courtney Garcia  for more information.
  • Any employee with DACA may contact Jennifer Short  in Human Resources with questions related to employment, or the Office of Institutional Diversity (diversity@oregonstate.edu) with general questions.

Events & Resources

Conversations About Dementia: When someone is showing signs of dementia, it’s time to talk. Our Dementia Conversations class is designed to help you talk with your family about some challenging and often uncomfortable topics around Alzheimer’s and dementia. August 15th from 3:00 pm to 4:00 pm in Salem, for more information visit the event page.

2018 Corvallis Pride Pageant: Haus of Dharma invites you join them for the first annual Corvallis Pride Pageant! Hosted by Miss Dharma Prada MacPherson & Lucielle S. Balls. Three tittles will be awarded Miss Corvallis Pride 2018, Mr. Corvallis Pride 2018, and Mx. Corvallis Pride 2018! August 17th at 10:00 pm in Corvallis, for more information vist the event page.

JADE International Night Market 2018: Portland Community College Southeast Campus ainvites the public to enjoy authentic international cuisine, cultural performances, and celebrate the vibrant community that resides in the Jade District neighborhood and in East Portland.  For more information check out the event page.

Fiesta en el Parque: Fiesta en el Parque is a free community-wide event celebrating Latino culture and diversity in the Tualatin Hills Park & Recreation District. August 19th from 2:00 to 6:00pm in Beaverton, for more information visit the event page.

In the News

OSU changing building names to promote inclusivity 

After a two-year process, Oregon State University President Ed Ray announced Monday that he has chosen new monikers for three university buildings whose previous namesakes have ties to historical racist positions or beliefs. (see also KEZI, Register-GuardKXL)

What are you reading?

Please share an interesting book, blog, or article you’ve read lately. What’s one insight you gleaned?

Extension in the news

Oregon’s Outdoor School
KUMA
Chris Elliott, OSU Extension Office in Corvallis and Mark Mulvihill, Intermountain ESD Superintendent discuss Outdoor School with host Butch Thurman.
Topics include how Outdoor School is funded, Measure 99, adding State funded staffing to the mix, impact of the program and best practices for student success.

Yellowjackets ruining your picnic? Here’s what the buzz is all about
KATU
Western Oregon residents are seeing more yellowjackets than usual in their yards and gardens this year, according to Gail Langellotto, an Oregon Sate University Extension entomologist.

Pesticide ruling impacts local ag producers
Ontario Argus Observer
Oregon State University Extension Agent Stuart Reitz confirmed in an email that chlorpyrifos is commonly used in the area and one of the products it appears in is Lorsban.

In this week’s issue:

Annual Conference: Send us your Proposals!

Extension Annual Conference: Proposals and Session Information Due August 27
It’s time to submit your proposals for Extension Annual Conference (December 3-6, 2018). The website has been updated with proposal information.

Elevate Extension Keynote Talks – NEW! We’re going to hear amazing stories and ideas from our own ranks this year. We are looking for 5-8 people to present seven minute talks. The topic and content must involve one or more of these themes and be of interest to a broad Extension audience:
• Innovation in Extension Programs (either through new efforts or by making programs/processes better, more efficient, or wider-reaching)
• Working together to solve “wicked” problems
• Building a culture of diversity, equity, and inclusion
• An inspirational case study about the transformative power of Extension

Additionally, we would be interested in seeing proposals on the following specific ideas: civil discourse, public health and well being, OSU strategic initiatives, convening communities, extension leadership to build community, the future of Extension services, societal trends, and storytelling.
Apply for keynote talks here!

Peer Reviewed Workshops and Posters – This worked so well last year, we’re doing it again! OSUEA will review the proposals. The Request for Proposals includes descriptions of each type of presentation:
Workshops: Teach a new skill or share a program
Summits: Convene a session to bring out new ideas and best practices (see World Café for a suggested format)
Refereed Posters: Share your display about a new program or research findings
Poster to Share With Peers: Show off your favorite educational or promotional display
– Apply for workshops and posters here!

For everything else that needs to be scheduled – Planning a meeting? Admin sponsored session? HR training? Applications are subject to approval and schedule constraints. Use the Invited Application.

COARC name change

The name of the Central Oregon Agricultural Research Center (COARC) in Madras has been updated to the Central Oregon Agriculture Research and Extension Center (COAREC), effective immediately.

This change reflects the strong Extension work that faculty and staff assigned to the Madras location are involved in. The name change was approved through Oregon State’s unit name change process and has the support of local stakeholders.

Carol Tollefson continues her role as director and all faculty and staff assignments and work locations will remain the same.

Over the coming weeks, Carol will facilitate the logistical aspects of this name change, including updating signage, logos, and other materials as needed.

In Memoriam

Wayne D. Mosher, long time Extension specialist from Douglas County has passed away. He specialized in forage management and animal nutrition. During his career he traveled the world sharing his expertise and retired from OSU as a Professor Emeritus. He co-authored several papers, worked on many research projects, and started the OSU Forage/Livestock Research Program Endowment.

To honor his wishes there will not be a service.  In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Honor Flight of Oregon: honorflightoforegon.org, Providence Benedictine Hospice of Mt Angel or the OSU Forage/Livestock Research Program Endowment.

Extension Web Update

Websites work because the people behind it are focused on better ways to making it function. This doesn’t only include technical pieces, but also the people who make the content happen. In this week’s web upgrade blog post How to Guide your Content Team Forward, EESC links to a new instructional guide and shares advice from content teams that have completed entering their priority content into the new Extension website.

Diversity Highlights

Please contact analu.fonseca@oregonstate.edu with any questions or comments or if you have suggestions for events or news stories to include in Diversity Highlights.

Events & Resources

2nd Annual Pan African Festival: The festival will host live music, dance, food and entertainment. Along with talks and discussion around health education, education and career awareness, financial literacy, and relevant other opportunities for people to get involved and take action to solve problems in their community. August 11th in Portland form 12:00pm to 8:30pm, for more info visit the event page.

Conversation Project: Where Are You From? Exploring What Makes Us Oregonians: Considering that Oregon has a history of racial exclusion, these changes prompt questions about Oregonian identity and values. How do we build communities that welcome people of all backgrounds? September 6th 12:00 pm, for more info visit the event page.

In the News

Camp at OSU combines mariachi music and science 

This week, 30 eighth- through 12th-grade students from Portland, Hillsboro and Forest Grove are participating in the third annual Mariachi STEAM Camp at Oregon State University. (STEAM stands for science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics.)

Naming project aims to remind visitors that Marys Peak is still sacred to tribes 

Settlers and their descendants have historically ignored — even disrespected — these sacred spaces, said Oregon State University professor Natchee Barnd. He hopes the project inspires visitors to go beyond understanding the past — to ask what else can be done in the future.

Diversifying Lake Oswego School District’s staff ‘a matter of urgency’

Increasing equity, diversity and inclusion continues to be a primary focus as the Lake Oswego School District approaches a new school year.

PSU offers Oregon’s first major in Indigenous Nations Studies

Portland State University is offering the state’s first major in Indigenous Nations and Native American Studies.

What are you reading?

Book: The Blood of Emmett Till (2017) by Timothy Tyson

Emmett Till was a 14 year old African-American youth from Chicago. In the summer of 1955 he went to visit his relatives in Money, Mississippi. There is a strong connection between African-American families from this part of Mississippi and the South side of Chicago. The industrialization of the north (creating a pull) and Jim Crow Law (creating a push) influenced migration from Mississippi to Chicago after the Civil War. While visiting that summer, Emmett was accused of flirting with a white store clerk named Carolyn Bryant. Later that night he was pulled from his bed in the by two white men, the clerk’s husband and brother. Emmett was brutally murdered and dumped in the Tallahatchie River. His mother requested his body be brought back to Chicago for an open-casket funeral. The funeral was attended by thousands, was well-covered in the media, and sparked a new energy in the civil rights movement for a young generation of African Americans. Spoiler alert – both white men were acquitted.

Best quote in the book “Nothing that boy did could ever justify what happened to him” – Carolyn Bryant.

August 28th marks 63 years since is brutal murder. Wiley Thompson

Extension in the news

More farms, ranches embracing agritourism
Capital Press
Mary Stewart, an agritourism specialist for the Oregon State University Extension, along with other experts, is trying to get USDA to adopt a wider view of agritourism.